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  • 1.
    Dev, Apurba
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Horak, Josef
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kaiser, Andreas
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Yuan, Xichen
    UCBL Claude Bernard University Lyon 1, France.
    Perols, Anna
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Björk, Per
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kleimann, Pascal
    UCBL Claude Bernard University Lyon 1, France.
    Linnros, Jan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Electrokinetic effect for molecular recognition: A label-free approach for real-time biosensing2016In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 82, p. 55-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a simple and inexpensive method for label-free detection of biomolecules. The method monitors the changes in streaming current in a fused silica capillary as target biomolecules bind to immobilized receptors on the inner surface of the capillary. To validate the concept, we show detection and time response of different protein-ligand and protein-protein systems: biotin-avidin and biotin-streptavidin, barstar-dibarnase and Z domain-immunoglobulin G (IgG). We show that specific binding of these biomolecules can be reliably monitored using a very simple setup. Using sequential injections of various proteins at a diverse concentration range and as well as diluted human serum we further investigate the capacity of the proposed technique to perform specific target detection from a complex sample. We also investigate the time for the signal to reach equilibrium and its dependence on analyte concentration and demonstrate that the current setup can be used to detect biomolecules at a concentration as low as 100 pM without requiring any advanced device fabrication procedures. Finally, an analytical model based on diffusion theory has been presented to explain the dependence of the saturation time on the analyte concentration and capillary dimensions and how reducing length and inner diameter of the capillary is predicted to give faster detection and in practice also lower limit of detection.

  • 2.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Kuralay, Filiz
    Ordu University, Turkey.
    Jager, Edwin W. H.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Beni, Valerio
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Acreo. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Turner, Anthony P. F.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Electrochemical bacterial detection using poly(3-aminophenylboronic acid)-based imprinted polymer2017In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 93, p. 87-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biosensors can deliver the rapid bacterial detection that is needed in many fields including food safety, clinical diagnostics, biosafety and biosecurity. Whole-cell imprinted polymers have the potential to be applied as recognition elements in biosensors for selective bacterial detection. In this paper, we report on the use of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (3-APBA) for the electrochemical fabrication of a cell-imprinted polymer (CIP). The use of a monomer bearing a boronic acid group, with its ability to specifically interact with cis-diol, allowed the formation of a polymeric network presenting both morphological and chemical recognition abilities. A particularly beneficial feature of the proposed approach is the reversibility of the cis-diol-boronic group complex, which facilitates easy release of the captured bacterial cells and subsequent regeneration of the CIP. Staphylococcus epidermidis was used as the model target bacteria for the CIP and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was explored for the label-free detection of the target bacteria. The modified electrodes showed a linear response over the range of 103–107 cfu/mL. A selectivity study also showed that the CIP could discriminate its target from non-target bacteria having similar shape. The CIPs had high affinity and specificity for bacterial detection and provided a switchable interface for easy removal of bacterial cell.

  • 3. Reimhult, K
    et al.
    Yoshimatsu, K
    Risveden, K
    Chen, S
    Ye, L
    Krozer, A
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Characterization of QCM sensor surfaces coated with molecularly imprinted nanoparticles2008In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 1908-1914Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Siegel, G
    et al.
    Kauschmann, M
    Malmsten, M
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Walter, A
    Buddecke, E
    Anionic biopolymers as blood flow sensors1996In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 11, p. 281-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The finding of flow-dependent vasodilatation rests on the basic observation that with an increase in blood flow the vessels become wider, with a decrease the vascular smooth muscle cells contract. Proteoheparan sulphate could be the sensor macromolecule at the endothelial cell membrane-blood interface, that reacts on the shear stress generated by the flowing blood, and that informs and regulates the vascular smooth muscle cells via a signal transduction chain. This anionic biopolyelectrolyte possesses viscoelastic and specific ion binding properties which allow a change of its configuration in dependence on shear stress and electrostatic charge density. The blood flow sensor undergoes a conformational transition from a random coil to an extended filamentous state with increasing flow, whereby Na+ ions from the blood are bound. Owing to the intramolecular elastic recoil forces of proteoheparan sulphate the slowing of a flow rate causes an entropic coiling the expulsion of Na+ ions and thus an interruption of the signal chain. Under physiological conditions, the conformation and Na+ binding proved to be extremely Ca2+-sensitive while K+ and Mg2+ ions play a minor role for the susceptibility of the sensor. Via counterion migration of the bound Na+ ions along the sensor glycosaminoglycan side chains and following Na+ passage through an unspecific ion channel in the endothelial cell membrane, the signal transduction chain leads to a membrane depolarization with Ca2+ influx into the cells. This stimulates the EDRF/NO production and release from the endothelial cells. The consequence is vasodilatation.

  • 5. Siegel, G
    et al.
    Malmsten, M
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Klüssendorf, D
    Michel, F
    A receptor-based biosensor for lipoprotein docking at the endothelial surface and vascular matrix2001In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 16, p. 895-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteoheparan sulfate can be adsorbed to a methylated silica surface in a monomolecular layer via its transmembrane hydrophobic protein core domain. Due to electrostatic repulsion, its anionic glycosaminoglycan side chains are stretched out into the blood substitute solution, representing a receptor site for specific lipoprotein binding through basic amino acid-rich residues within their apolipoproteins. The binding process was studied by ellipsometric techniques showing that HDL has a high binding affinity to the receptor and a protective effect on interfacial heparan sulfate proteoglycan layers, with respect to LDL and Ca2+ complexation. LDL was found to deposit strongly at the proteoheparan sulfate, particularly in the presence of Ca2+, thus creating the complex formation `proteoglycan¯low density lipoprotein¯calcium'. This ternary complex build-up may be interpreted as arteriosclerotic nanoplaque formation on the molecular level responsible for the arteriosclerotic primary lesion. On the other hand, HDL bound to heparan sulfate proteoglycan protected against LDL docking and completely suppressed calcification of the proteoglycan¯lipoprotein complex. In addition, HDL and aqueous garlic extract were able to reduce the ternary complex deposition and to disintegrate HS-PG/LDL/Ca2+ aggregates. Although much remains unclear regarding the mechanism of lipoprotein depositions at proteoglycan-coated surfaces, it seems clear that the use of such systems offers possibilities for investigating lipoprotein deposition at a `nanoscopic' level under close to physiological conditions. In particular, Ca2+-promoted LDL deposition and the protective effect of HDL, even at high Ca2+ and LDL concentrations, agree well with previous clinical observations regarding risk and beneficial factors for early stages of atherosclerosis. Therefore, we believe that the system can be of some use in investigations, e.g. of the interplay between different lipoproteins in arteriosclerotic plaque formation, as well as in high throughput screening of candidate drugs to atherosclerosis in a biosensor application

  • 6.
    Simon, Daniel T.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Linköping University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Karin C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, David
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Burström, Gustav
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Galter, Dagmar
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    An organic electronic biomimetic neuron enable sauto-regulated neuro modulation2015In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 71, p. 359-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current therapies for neurological disorders are based on traditional medication and electric stimulation. Here, we present an organic electronicbiomimetic neuron, with the capacity to precisely intervene with the underlying malfunctioning signalling pathway using endogenous substances. The fundamental function of neurons, defined as chemical-to-electrical-to-chemical signal transduction, is achieved by connecting enzyme-based amperometric biosensors and organic electronic ion pumps. Selective biosensors transduce chemical signals into an electric current, which regulates electrophoretic delivery of chemical substances without necessitating liquid flow. Biosensors detected neurotransmitters in physiologically relevant ranges of 5–80 µM, showing linear response above 20 µm with approx. 0.1 nA/µM slope. When exceeding defined threshold concentrations, biosensor output signals, connected via custom hardware/software, activated local or distant neurotransmitter delivery from the organic electronic ion pump. Changes of 20 µM glutamate or acetylcholinetriggered diffusive delivery of acetylcholine, which activated cells via receptor-mediated signalling. This was observed in real-time by single-cell ratiometric Ca2+ imaging. The results demonstrate the potential of the organic electronic biomimetic neuron in therapies involving long-range neuronal signalling by mimicking the function of projection neurons. Alternatively, conversion of glutamate-induced descending neuromuscular signals into acetylcholine-mediated muscular activation signals may be obtained, applicable for bridging injured sites and active prosthetics.

  • 7.
    Tian, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Qiu, Zhen
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ma, Jing
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Attomolar Zika virus oligonucleotide detection based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification and AC susceptometry2016In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 86, p. 420-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because of the serological cross-reactivity among the flaviviruses, molecular detection methods, such as reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), play an important role in the recent Zika outbreak. However, due to the limited sensitivity, the detection window of RT-PCR for Zika viremia is only about one week after symptom onset. By combining loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and AC susceptometry, we demonstrate a rapid and homogeneous detection system for the Zika virus oligonucleotide. Streptavidin-magnetic nanoparticles (streptavidin-MNPs) are premixed with LAMP reagents including the analyte and biotinylated primers, and their hydrodynamic volumes are dramatically increased after a successful LAMP reaction. Analyzed by a portable AC susceptometer, the changes of the hydrodynamic volume are probed as Brownian relaxation frequency shifts, which can be used to quantify the Zika virus oligonucleotide. The proposed detection system can recognize 1 aM synthetic Zika virus oligonucleotide in 20% serum with a total assay time of 27 min, which can hopefully widen the detection window for Zika viremia and is therefore promising in worldwide Zika fever control.

  • 8. Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T
    et al.
    Mezger, A
    Herthnek, D
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Svedlindh, P
    Nilsson, M
    Strömme, M
    Detection of Rolling Circle Amplified DNA Molecules using Probe Tagged Magnetic Nanobeads in a portable AC susceptometer2011In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 29, p. 195-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Åisjöen, F
    et al.
    Schneiderman, JF
    Astalan, AP
    Kalabukhov, A
    Johansson, Christer
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Acreo.
    Winkler, D
    A new approach for bioassays based on frequency€“ time-domain measurements of magnetic nanoparticles2010In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 25, p. 1008-13Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
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  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
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