Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gärtner, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Biozoon GmbH, Germany.
    Matullat, Imke
    ttz Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Genuttis, Darleen
    Biozoon GmbH, Germany.
    Engelhardt, Sarah
    Biozoon GmbH, Germany.
    Sveinsdóttir, Kolbrún
    Matís ohf. Icelandic Food and Biotech R&D, Iceland; University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Niimi, Jun
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Rusu, Alexandru
    Biozoon GmbH, Germany.
    Vegan spread applications of alternative protein from torula yeast: product development and consumer perception2023In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 7, article id 1285883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alternative protein sources are gaining attraction in food industry and consumers. Proteins obtained by single-cell organisms, such as torula yeast, are of enormous interest, as they are highly scalable, efficient, and sustainable, and the production costs are comparably low. Nevertheless, proteins obtained from yeasts are still mostly known and studied for feed applications, despite their nutritional, functional, and sensory benefits for various food applications. Testing consumer acceptance of products, especially products containing alternative proteins provides insights into, e.g., market success, consumer perception, and optimization potential. In this study, the development of two vegan spread powders, high in protein and containing torula yeast as an alternative protein source, is introduced. The result of food product development using torula yeast were “Leberwurst”-style (14.7% protein) and a “Balkan”-style (9.7% protein) spreads both meeting the criteria “at least 20% kcal from proteins of total product kcal” and thus claimable as “high-protein.” The application of the alternative protein from torula yeast within the final products was studied by a consumer acceptance test (n = 123) within three different countries (Germany, Iceland, and Sweden). Consumers also rated their trust in food production actors, the food industry in particular, and their willingness to try new foods. Overall, both spreads received acceptance values in the range of “like slightly.” It is noticeable that the consumers liked the spread “Balkan style” more than “Leberwurst”-style. The background variables revealed higher neophobic characteristics of Icelandic consumers compared with Swedish or German consumers. However, German consumers felt transparency, and communication was missing, but Icelandic consumers, in general, had more trust in the overall food value chain. This knowledge allows for the development of strategies that address cultural-specific barriers and capitalize on cultural values that promote openness to culinary innovation. The identification of cultural variations in consumer preferences emphasizes the need for customized approaches to product development and marketing. These findings could have implications for businesses and policymakers in understanding and catering to the preferences and concerns of consumers in these respective countries. Businesses might benefit from emphasizing transparency and improving communication strategies. This could involve providing clear information about the sourcing, production, and other aspects of the food value chain.

  • 2.
    Krause, G.
    et al.
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Germany.
    Le Vay, L.
    Bangor University, UK.
    Buck, B. H.
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Germany; University of Applied Sciences Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Costa-Pierce, B. A.
    Ecological Aquaculture Foundation, USA; Ecological Aquaculture Foundation, Portugal.
    Dewhurst, T.
    Kelson Marine Co, USA.
    Heasman, K. G.
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Nevejan, N.
    Ghent University, Belgium.
    Nielsen, P.
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Nielsen, K. N.
    Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Park, K.
    Kunsan National University, South Korea.
    Schupp, M. F.
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Germany: University of Dundee, UK.
    Thomas, J. -B
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Troell, M.
    Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Webb, J.
    Bangor University, UK.
    Wrange, Anna-Lisa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Strand, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Prospects of Low Trophic Marine Aquaculture Contributing to Food Security in a Net Zero-Carbon World2022In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 6, article id 875509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To limit compromising the integrity of the planet, a shift is needed towards food production with low environmental impacts and low carbon footprint. How to put such transformative change towards sustainable food production whilst ensuring food security into practice remains a challenge and will require transdisciplinary approaches. Combining expertise from natural- and social sciences as well as industry perspectives, an alternative vision for the future in the marine realm is proposed. This vision includes moving towards aquaculture mainly of low trophic marine (LTM) species. Such shift may enable a blue transformation that can support a sustainable blue economy. It includes a whole new perspective and proactive development of policy-making which considers, among others, the context-specific nature of allocation of marine space and societal acceptance of new developments, over and above the decarbonization of food production, vis á vis reducing regulatory barriers for the industry for LTM whilst acknowledging the complexities of upscaling and outscaling. This needs to be supported by transdisciplinary research co-produced with consumers and wider public, as a blue transformation towards accelerating LTM aquaculture opportunities in a net zero-carbon world can only occur by considering the demands of society. Copyright © 2022 Krause, Le Vay, Buck, Costa-Pierce, Dewhurst, Heasman, Nevejan, Nielsen, Nielsen, Park, Schupp, Thomas, Troell, Webb, Wrange, Ziegler and Strand.

  • 3.
    Rivas-Franco, Frederico
    et al.
    Lincoln University, New Zealand; INIA, Uruguay.
    Hampton, John
    Lincoln University, New Zealand.
    Altier, Nora
    INIA, Uruguay.
    Swaminathan, Jayanthi
    Lincoln University, New Zealand.
    Rostás, Michael
    Lincoln University, New Zealand.
    Wessman, Per
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Saville, David
    5Saville Statistical Consulting Limited, New Zealand.
    Jackson, Trevor
    Lincoln Research Center, New Zealand.
    Jackson, Mark
    USDA United States Department of Agriculture, USA.
    Glare, Travis
    Lincoln University, New Zealand.
    Production of Microsclerotia From Entomopathogenic Fungi and Use in Maize Seed Coating as Delivery for Biocontrol Against Fusarium graminearum2020In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 4, article id 606828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The commercial use of the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium spp. in biopesticides has gained more interest since the discovery that several species of this genus are able to colonize roots. In general, commercial products with Metarhizium are formulated based on conidia for insect pest control. The process of mass production, harvesting, and formulation of infective conidia can be detrimental for conidial viability. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Metarhizium spp. are able to produce high concentrations of resistant structures, known as microsclerotia, when grown in liquid media. Microsclerotia are desiccation tolerant, with excellent storage stability, and are capable of producing high quantities of infective conidia after rehydration. The aim of this study was to evaluate microsclerotia production by different isolates of Metarhizium spp. and determine the effect of microsclerotia coated onto maize seeds on plant growth in the presence of soil-borne pathogen Fusarium graminearum. On average, ~1 × 105 microsclerotia/mL were produced by selected isolates of M. anisopliae (A1080 and F672) and Metarhizium robertsii (F447). Microsclerotia were formulated as granules with diatomaceous earth and used for seed coating, after which propagules produced around 5 × 106 CFU/g of seeds. In the presence of the plant pathogen, maize plants grown from untreated seeds had the lowest growth, while plants treated with the Metarhizium microsclerotia had significantly greater growth than the control plants. Hyphae were observed growing on and in root tissues in all the Metarhizium spp. treatments but not in samples from control plants. Metarhizium hyphal penetration points' on roots were observed 1 month after sowing, indicating the fungi were colonizing roots as endophytes. The results obtained indicate that microsclerotia can be coated onto seeds, providing plant protection against soil plant pathogens and a method to establish Metarhizium in the ecto- and endo-rhizosphere of maize roots, allowing the persistence of this biocontrol agent. 

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf