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  • 1.
    Abitbol, Tiffany
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Alvarez-Asencio, Ruben
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Fall, Andreas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Nanocellulose-Based Hybrid Materials for UV Blocking and Mechanically Robust Barriers2020In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 2245-2254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose (NC)-based hybrid coatings and films containing CeO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) to impart UV screening and hardness properties, respectively, were prepared by solvent casting. The NC film-forming component (75 wt % of the overall solids) was composed entirely of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) or of CNCs combined with cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). Zeta potential measurements indicated that the four NP types (CNC, CNF, CeO2, and SiO2) were stably dispersed in water and negatively charged at pH values between 6 and 9. The combination of NPs within this pH range ensured uniform formulations and homogeneous coatings and films, which blocked UV light, the extent of which depended on film thickness and CeO2 NP content, while maintaining good transparency in the visible spectrum (∼80%). The addition of a low amount of CNFs (1%) reduced the film hardness, but this effect was compensated by the addition of SiO2 NPs. Chiral nematic self-assembly was observed in the mixed NC film; however, this ordering was disrupted by the addition of the oxide NPs. The roughness of the hybrid coatings was reduced by the inclusion of oxide NPs into the NC matrix perhaps because the spherical oxide NPs were able to pack into the spaces between cellulose fibrils. We envision these hybrid coatings and films in barrier applications, photovoltaics, cosmetic formulations, such as sunscreens, and for the care and maintenance of wood and glass surfaces, or other surfaces that require a smooth, hard, and transparent finish and protection from UV damage.

  • 2.
    Cahill, Patrick
    et al.
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Grant, Thomas
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Rennison, David
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Champeau, Olivier
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Boundy, Michael
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Passfield, Emillie
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Brimble, Margaret
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Svenson, Johan
    Cawthron Institute, New Zealand.
    Nature-Inspired Peptide Antifouling Biocide: Coating Compatibility, Field Validation, and Environmental Stability2023In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 2415-2425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports the development of a class of eco-friendly antifouling biocides based on a cyclic dipeptide scaffold, 2,5-diketopiperazine (2,5-DKP). The lead compound cyclo(N-Bip-l-Arg-N-Bip-l-Arg) (1) was synthesized in gram amounts and used to assess the compatibility with an ablation/hydration coating, efficacy against biofouling, and biodegradation. Leaching of 1 from the coating into seawater was assessed via a rotating drum method, revealing relatively stable and predictable leaching rates under dynamic shear stress conditions (36.1 ± 19.7 to 25.2 ± 9.1 ng-1 cm-2 day-1) but low or no leaching under static conditions. The coatings were further analyzed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), with 1 seen to localize at the surface of the coating in a surfactant-like fashion. When coatings were deployed in the ocean, detectable reductions in biofouling development were measured for up to 11 weeks. After this time, biofouling overwhelmed the performance of the coating, consistent with leaching kinetics. Biodegradation of 1 in seawater was assessed using theoretical oxygen demand and analytical quantification. Masking effects were observed at higher concentrations of 1 due to antimicrobial properties, but half-lives were calculated ranging from 13.4 to 16.2 days. The results can rationally inform future development toward commercial antifouling products. 

  • 3.
    Herzberg, Moshe
    et al.
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Eliahu, Sarai
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Bodin, Lovisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Agrenius, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Zlotkin, Amir
    DisperseBio Ltd, Israel.
    Svenson, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Efficient prevention of marine biofilm formation employing a surface-grafted repellent marine peptide2021In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 3360-3373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creation of surfaces resistant to the formation of microbial biofilms via biomimicry has been heralded as a promising strategy to protect a range of different materials ranging from boat hulls to medical devices and surgical instruments. In our current study, we describe the successful transfer of a highly effective natural marine biofilm inhibitor to the 2D surface format. A series of cyclic peptides inspired by the natural equinatoxin II protein produced by Beadlet anemone (Actinia equine) have been evaluated for their ability to inhibit the formation of a mixed marine microbial consortium on polyamide reverse osmosis membranes. In solution, the peptides are shown to effectively inhibit settlement and biofilm formation in a nontoxic manner down to 1 nM concentrations. In addition, our study also illustrates how the peptides can be applied to disperse already established biofilms. Attachment of a hydrophobic palmitic acid tail generates a peptide suited for strong noncovalent surface interactions and allows the generation of stable noncovalent coatings. These adsorbed peptides remain attached to the surface at significant shear stress and also remain active, effectively preventing the biofilm formation over 24 h. Finally, the covalent attachment of the peptides to an acrylate surface was also evaluated and the prepared coatings display a remarkable ability to prevent surface colonization at surface loadings of 55 ng/cm2 over 48 h. The ability to retain the nontoxic antibiofilm activity, documented in solution, in the covalent 2D-format is unprecedented, and this natural peptide motif displays high potential in several material application areas.

  • 4.
    Knutsen, Maja
    et al.
    Oxy Solutions, Norway.
    Agrenius, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Ugland, Hege
    Petronis, Sarunas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Haglerod, Camilla
    Oxy Solutions, Norway.
    Håkansson, Joakim
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Oxygenated Nanocellulose - A Material Platform for Antibacterial Wound Dressing Devices2021In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 7554-7562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both carboxylated cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and dissolved oxygen (DO) have been reported to possess antibacterial properties. However, the combination for use as wound dressings against biofilm infections in chronic wounds is less known. The present study reports the development of oxygenated CNF dispersions that exhibit strong antibacterial effect. Carboxylated CNF dispersions with different oxidation levels were oxygenated by the OXY BIO System and tested for antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The results reveal that the higher oxidation level of the CNFs, the better antibacterial effect. Scanning electron microscopy of bacterial biofilms revealed that a potential mechanism of action of the CNFs is the formation of a network surrounding and entrapping the bacteria. This effect is further potentiated by the oxygenation process. A CNF sample (concentration 0.6 wt %) that was oxygenated to a DO level of 46.4 mg/L demonstrated a strong antibacterial effect against S. aureus in vivo using a mouse model of surgical site infection. The oxygenated CNF dispersion reduced the bacterial survival by 71%, after 24 h treatment. The potent antibacterial effect indicates that oxygenated nanocellulose is a promising material for antibacterial wound dressings. © 2021 The Authors.

  • 5.
    Nordli, Henriette
    et al.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Pukstad, Brita
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Trondheim University Hospital, Norway.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, PFI.
    Rokstad, Anne
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; dCentre of Molecular Inflammation Research, Norway; St. Olavs University Hospital, Norway.
    Ultrapure Wood Nanocellulose - Assessments of Coagulation and Initial Inflammation Potential2019In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1107-1118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a lepirudin-based human whole blood model, we evaluated the initial inflammatory and coagulation responses of dense and porous ultrapure (<50 endotoxin units/grams) cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), of carboxylated grade. The CNF was compared to the wound dressing AquaCel because it is a potential wound-healing material. The porous CNF aerogels induced the strongest coagulation potential measured as prothrombin factor 1.2 (PTF1.2). AquaCel induced the strongest complement response by terminal complement complex (TCC) and surface C3c. All materials activated leukocytes CD11b, while the levels of only 3 of 27 cytokines were significantly changed, limited to (i) an elevation of the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL) by the CNF aerogel, (ii) a reduction of eosinophil chemotactic proteins (eotaxin/CCL11) by the CNF aerogel, and (iii) a reduction of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) by all CNF materials. In conclusion, the CNF materials and AquaCel differently activate coagulation, complement, and cytokines, improving the selection possibilities in various treatment situations of wound healing.

  • 6.
    Rashad, Ahmad
    et al.
    University of Bergen, norway.
    Grøndahl, Martha
    NTNU, Norway.
    Heggset, Ellinor B
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Mustafa, Kamal
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design. NTNU, Norway.
    Responses of Rat Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Nanocellulose with Different Functional Groups2023In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 987-998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are multiscale hydrophilic biocompatible polysaccharide materials derived from wood and plants. TEMPO-mediated oxidation of CNFs (TO-CNF) turns some of the primary hydroxyl groups to carboxylate and aldehyde groups. Unlike carboxylic functional groups, there is little or no information about the biological role of the aldehyde groups on the surface of wood-based CNFs. In this work, we replaced the aldehyde groups in the TO-CNF samples with carboxyl groups by another oxidation treatment (TO-O-CNF) or with primary alcohols with terminal hydroxyl groups by a reduction reaction (TO-R-CNF). Rat mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow were seeded on polystyrene tissue culture plates (TCP) coated with CNFs with and without aldehyde groups. TCP and TCP coated with bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) were used as control groups. Protein adsorption measurements demonstrated that more proteins were adsorbed from cell culture media on all CNF surfaces compared to BNC. Live/dead and lactate dehydrogenase assays confirmed that all nanocellulose biomaterials supported excellent cell viability. Interestingly, TO-R-CNF samples, which have no aldehyde groups, showed better cell spreading than BNC and comparable results to TCP. Unlike TO-O-CNF surfaces, which have no aldehyde groups either, TO-R-CNF stimulated cells, in osteogenic medium, to have higher alkaline phosphatase activity and to form more biomineralization than TCP and TO-CNF groups. These findings indicate that the presence of aldehyde groups (280 ± 14 μmol/g) on the surface of TEMPO-oxidized CNFs might have little or no effect on attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. © 2023 The Authors.

  • 7.
    Tasiopoulos, Christos
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Petronis, Sarunas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Sahlin, Herman
    Neoss Ltd, Sweden.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Surface Functionalization of PTFE Membranes Intended for Guided Bone Regeneration Using Recombinant Spider Silk2020In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 577-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alveolar bone loss is usually treated with guided bone regeneration, a dental procedure which utilizes a tissue-separation membrane. The barrier membrane prevents pathogens and epithelial cells to invade the bone augmentation site, thereby permitting osteoblasts to deposit minerals and build up bone. This study aims at adding bioactive properties to otherwise inert PTFE membranes in order to enhance cell adherence and promote proliferation. A prewetting by ethanol and stepwise hydration protocol was herein employed to overcome high surface tension of PTFE membranes and allow for a recombinant spider silk protein, functionalized with a cell-binding motif from fibronectin (FN-silk), to self-assemble into a nanofibrillar coating. HaCaT and U-2 OS cells were seeded onto soft and hard tissue sides, respectively, of membranes coated with FN-silk. The cells could firmly adhere as early as 1 h post seeding, as well as markedly grow in numbers when kept in culture for 7 days. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy images revealed that adherent cells could form a confluent monolayer and develop essential cell-cell contacts during 1 week of culture. Hence, functionalized PTFE membranes have a potential of better integration at the implantation site, with reduced risk of membrane displacement as well as exposure to oral pathogens.

1 - 7 of 7
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