Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Niemelä-Anttonen, Henna
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Koivuluoto, Heli
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Tuominen, Mikko
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Teisala, Hannu
    Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Germany.
    Juuti, Paxton
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Haapanen, Janne
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Harra, Juha
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Stenroos, Christian
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Lahti, Johanna
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Kuusipalo, Jurkka
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Mäkelä, Jyrki M.
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Vuoristo, Petri
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Icephobicity of Slippery Liquid Infused Porous Surfaces under Multiple Freeze–Thaw and Ice Accretion–Detachment Cycles2018In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 5, no 20, article id 1800828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface engineering can be used to prevent ice accumulation and adhesion in environments that deal with icing problems. One recent engineering approach, slippery liquid infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), comprises a smooth and slippery lubricating surface, where lubricant is trapped within the pores of a solid material to repel various substances, such as water and ice. However, it remains unclear whether the slippery surfaces retain their icephobic characteristics under the impact of supercooled water droplets or repeated freezing and melting cycles. Here, the icephobic properties of SLIPS are evaluated under multiple droplet freeze–thaw and ice accretion–detachment cycles and compared to hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces. The experiments are designed to mimic real environmental conditions, thus, the icephobicity is investigated in icing wind tunnel, where ice accretion occurs through the impact of supercooled water droplets. The adhesion of ice remained extremely low, <10 kPa, which is four times lower than ice adhesion onto smooth fluoropolymer surfaces, even after repeated ice accretion–detachment cycles. Moreover, cyclic droplet freeze–thaw experiments provide insight into the effects of temperature cycling on SLIPS wettability, showing stable wetting performance. The results suggest liquid infused porous surfaces as a potential solution to icephobicity under challenging and variating environmental conditions.

  • 2.
    Xin, Zhiging
    et al.
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Yan, Meijia
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Gu, Lingya
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Liu, Jianghao
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Liu, Ruping
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Li, Luhai
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Fang, Yi
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Mo, Lixin
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Li, Yaling
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Shen, Yang
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Guolin, Xinzheng
    BIGC Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, China.
    Li, Mingzhu
    Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, China.
    Yang, Li
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Papermaking and Packaging.
    Scalable Fabrication of Conductive Lines by Patterned Wettability-Assisted Bar-Coating for Low Cost Paper-Based Circuits2019In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 6, no 10, article id 1802047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterning technology on the paper based on wettability difference for paper-based devices has attracted significant attention for its low cost, easy degradability, and high flexibility. Here, conductive lines are rapidly prepared by patterned wettability-assisted bar-coating for low cost paper-based circuits. It is found that 7 s plasma treatment time for acquiring wettability difference is optimal, which resulted in not only effective splitting of the liquid film but also highly consistent line width with mask. Moreover, low retention force of hydrophobic surface is imperative for self-confinement of the ink into hydrophilic areas, especially for ink with high solid content. The sheet resistance of patterns can reach 5 Ω ◻ −1 after 980 nm laser sintering when using 50 wt% solid content ink with 110 cP viscosity. The geometries of line patterns, i.e., line width and spacing, can be readily tuned by varying the designed size of mask patterns. As-prepared conductive patterns show good conductivity even after 500 bending cycles at 2 mm bending radius. It is believed that this study will provide deeper understanding of wettability difference-assisted patterning process and represents a general strategy for selective wetting, especially for high viscosity ink.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7