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  • 1.
    Boyer, Robert
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Hunka, Agnieszka
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Linder, Marcus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Whalen, Katherine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Habibi, Shiva
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Mobility and Systems.
    Product Labels for the Circular Economy: Are Customers Willing to Pay for Circular?2021In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 27, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While existing research has probed consumer responses to products of different recirculation pathways (recycling, reuse, refurbishment, etc), little work has examined consumer responses to an explicit “circular economy” product label or how willingness to pay is influenced by a continuum of circularity levels. This paper reports on the results of an online survey experiment that tests whether customers are willing to pay more for products with a theoretical multi-level Circular Economy score. Conjoint analysis was used on 800 respondents in the United Kingdom to test their willingness to pay for mobile phones and robot vacuum cleaners at different levels of circularity alongside other product attribute combinations. Results indicate that the average customer almost always prefers a more “circular” product when compared to products with otherwise identical attributes, and that customers are consistently willing to pay more for products with low or moderate levels of circular content. However, analysis suggests that willingness to pay more for products disappears, and in some cases declines, as the proportion of recirculated content increases. Results offer evidence that applying a numerical circular economy label at low levels of recirculated content could be a profitable strategy for producers of mobile phones and robot vacuum cleaners. Such a strategy is less certain for heavily refurbished products, fully reused products, or other product types. © 2020 The Authors

  • 2.
    Chen, Xiaoxia
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Johansson, Björn
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Despeisse, Melanie
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Enabling the twin transitions: Digital technologies support environmental sustainability through lean principles2023In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 38, p. 13-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies seek innovative approaches to achieve successful Green and Digital transitions, where adopting lean production is one alternative. However, further investigation is required to formulate the strategy with practical inputs and identify what digital technologies could be applied with which lean principles for environmental benefits. Therefore, this study first conducted a case study in three companies to collect practice-based data. A complementary literature review was then carried out, investigating the existing frameworks and complementing practices of digitalized lean implementations and the resulting environmental impact. Consequently, the Internet of Things and related connection-level technologies were identified as the key facilitators in lean implementations, specifically in visualization, communication, and poka-yoke, leading to environmental benefits. Furthermore, a framework of DIgitalization Supports Environmental sustainability through Lean principles (DISEL) was proposed to help manufacturing companies identify the opportunities of digitalizing lean principles for Environmental sustainability, thus enabling the twin transitions and being resilient. © 2023 The Authors

  • 3.
    Harfeldt-Berg, Lovisa
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Resources. Lund University, Sweden.
    Harfeldt-Berg, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Connecting organizational context to environmental sustainability initiatives and industrial symbiosis: Empirical results and case analysis2023In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 40, p. 210-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial symbiosis can move us closer to a circular economy and enable efficient and sustainable use of resources. Its potential has however been far from realized, and to increase our understanding of why that is, we investigate drivers, barriers, and outcomes associated with both broadly defined environmental sustainability initiatives and industrial symbiosis from an organizational context perspective. A mixed-methods approach is used, combining statistical analysis of survey material with an embedded case study at an industrial symbiosis network in Sotenäs, Sweden. The position of the customer order decoupling point (CODP), a critical aspect of supply chains that separates forecast-based operations from those tied to specific orders, enables comparisons between organizations with primarily forecast-driven operations from those with primarily order-driven operations. We find that the CODP plays an important role in organizations' commitments to sustainability initiatives in general, as organizations with different CODP positions experience different levels of benefits from such initiatives. We did not find that the CODP position had the same impact for industrial symbiosis initiatives. Our results indicate that both industrial symbiosis, a very specific type of sustainability initiative and collaboration, and environmental sustainability initiatives in a broad sense, are associated with multiple, positive business outcomes. However, case study participants also described that their industrial symbiosis participation was time consuming and associated with an added administrative burden. This could be a reason why such collaborations are not more prevalent, despite the potential of bringing about several positive business outcomes. Finally, our findings indicate that industrial symbiosis may bring business-related benefits to firms regardless of their CODP position, but then in order to understand why such networks are not more prevalent, we recommend that future research investigates ways of quantifying and distributing burdens and rewards associated with industrial symbiosis collaboration. © 2023 The Authors

  • 4.
    Harris, S.
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Martin, M.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Diener, Derek
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, System Transition and Service Innovation.
    Circularity for circularity's sake?: Scoping review of assessment methods for environmental performance in the circular economy.2021In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 26, p. 172-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Circular Economy (CE) concept is receiving increasing global attention and has captivated many disciplines, from sustainability through to business and economics. There is currently a strong drive by companies, academics and governments alike to implement the CE. Numerous “circularity indicators” have emerged that measure material flow or recirculated value of a system (e.g. product or nation). However, if its implementation is to improve environmental performance of society, the action must be based on scientific evidence and quantification or it may risk driving “circularity for circularity's sake”. This paper, therefore, aims to review the recent circular economy literature that focuses on assessing the environmental implications of circularity of products and services. To do this we divide the system levels into micro (product level), meso (industrial estate/symbiosis) and macro (national or city level). A scoping literature review explores the assessment methods and indicators at each level. The results suggest that few studies compare circularity indicators with environmental performance or link the circularity indicators between society levels (e.g. the micro and macro-levels). However, adequate tools exist at each level (e.g. life cycle assessment (LCA) at the micro-level and multi-regional input-output (MRIO) analysis at the macro-level) to provide the ability to adequately assess and track the CE performance if placed within a suitable framework. The challenge to connect the micro and macro-levels remains. This would help understand the link between changes at the micro-level at the macro-level, and the environmental consequences. At the meso-level, industrial symbiosis continues to grow in potential, but there is a need for further research on the assessment of its contribution to environmental improvement. In addition, there is limited understanding of the use phase. For example, national monitoring programmes do not have indicators on stocks of materials or the extent of the circular economy processes (such as the reuse economy, maintenance and spare parts) which already contribute to the CE. The societal needs/functions framework offers a promising meso-level link to bridge the micro and macro-levels for assessment, monitoring and setting thresholds. © 2020 The Authors

  • 5.
    Shanmugam, Kavitha
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Bryngelsson, Susanne
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Östergren, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Climate Impact of Plant-based Meat Analogues: A Review of Life Cycle Assessments2023In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 36, p. 328-337Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition towards more plant-based diets is identified as an important measure for limiting dietary climate impact. Plant-based meat analogues (PBMAs) have been proposed as a viable lower carbon alternative to meat, and its market is rapidly growing globally. However, knowledge about the climate impact of PBMAs in relation to other foods is currently limited due to the challenge of comparing life cycle assessments (LCAs) using different methods. The aim of this study was to review the climate impact of PBMAs based on LCAs published up to 2021. Original LCA data were recalculated to harmonize differences in method choices among studies and presented as the climate impact of final products at factory gate. The median climate impact of PBMAs was estimated at 1.7 kg CO2 eq./kg of product with a more than fourfold variation in impact (0.5–2.4 kg CO2 eq./kg product). Climate impact per protein content of the final product varied from 0.4 to 1.2 kg CO2 eq./100 g protein with a median impact of 0.8 kg CO2 eq./100 g protein. Cultivation of raw materials and manufacturing were identified to be responsible for a large proportion of GHG emissions up to factory gate. However, the assessment of climate impact in the production chain was challenged by the level of detail of data provided. A transparent reporting strategy regarding the specific stages in the supply chain, method choices and product information is recommended to facilitate identification of hot spots to target for improved climate performance of future PBMAs and to enable accurate comparisons between studies. It could further be concluded that current scientific knowledge on the climate impact of PBMAs is based on a limited number of LCAs that often rely on a combination of secondary data and collected data at production scale or from pilot-scale production facilities. Future LCAs of PBMAs would benefit from additional assessments of commercial production using region- and site-specific data. © 2023 The Authors

  • 6.
    van Hal, Ollie
    et al.
    Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    van Zanten, Hannah H.E.
    Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Schrama, Johan W.
    Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    Kuiper, Kiki
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    de Boer, Imke J.M.
    Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    The role of fisheries and fish farming in a circular food system in the European Union2023In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 43, p. 113-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies that demonstrated animals can contribute to resource efficient food supply, by upcycling low-opportunity-cost feed (LCF), into valuable animal-source food, focussed solely on livestock (ruminants, pigs and poultry). Aquatic animals, however, also make valuable contributions to food supply, especially as they are our main natural source of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) ω-3 fatty acids. Our aim, therefore, was to assess the contribution of capture fisheries and fish farming (salmon and tilapia) to human nutrient supply in EU-28 (before Brexit), when feeding no biomass from arable land or waterbodies but only LCF to livestock and farmed fish. To this aim, we deployed an optimisation model allocating available LCF in the EU under various scenarios, to that combination of fish and livestock that maximises human digestible protein supply, while meeting human requirements of vitamin B12 and EPA + DHA. We found that capture fisheries could fulfil maximally around 40 % of daily per capita EPA + DHA requirements in EU28. This contribution would already require rebuilding fish stocks and prioritising edible fish for human consumption. To meet our EPA + DHA requirements we, thus, need to additionally farm fatty fish (salmon). Our results show that, when feeding only LCF, these fatty fish depend on by-products from fisheries to meet their own EPA + DHA requirements and on livestock slaughter by-products to meet their high protein requirements. Feeding livestock by-products to farmed fish, however, is not common practice due to concerns about consumer acceptance. We also demonstrate that upcycling LCF into valuable human food requires a proper balance of different farmed fish and livestock systems, tailored to the available LCF and desired nutrient supply to the human population. Overall, our results provide insights into the role of aquatic animals across land and water to human nutrient supply and give a direction for strategic sustainability development of both capture fisheries and fish farming. 

  • 7.
    Woodhouse, Anna
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Davis, Jennifer
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Pénicaud, Caroline
    University of Paris-Saclay, France.
    Östergren, Karin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Sustainability checklist in support of the design of food processing2018In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 16, p. 110-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To source food ingredients produced by best practice, reducing food loss in the processing line and implementation of new technologies are some examples of changes in the management in the food and drink sector that may offer advantages from a sustainability perspective. There are several tools and methods for evaluating sustainability for a food processing technology but often specific methodological knowledge is essential and many companies may not be able to carry out such a study due to time constraints and lack of data. The aim of this paper is to provide a tool with the format of a qualitative sustainability checklist, based on existing Life Cycle Assessment theory. The checklist is devoted to the design and adaptation of processing in the food industry to clarify the potential hot spots in new process design and is focused on environmental sustainability, although other aspects were conferred as well to demonstrate its potential. To identify the potential of this kind of checklist, it was tested by four food companies. The participant feedback was in general positive. The companies highlighted the benefits of creating awareness of sustainability issues within the company and providing a good overview without data collection. From a scientific point of view, the approach can help to overcome several challenges in sustainability assessment in the agri-food sector, especially some modeling issues and spatio-temporal resolution. © 2018 The Authors

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