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  • 1. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Koskinen, J
    Varjus, S
    Gerbig, Y
    Haefke, H
    Georgiou, S
    Zhmud, B
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Microlubrication effect by laser-textured steel surfaces2007In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 262, p. 369-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The beneficial effect on lubrication achieved through microtexturing by laser ablation was investigated. The investigation was based on two independent experimental approaches with oil-lubricated smooth and laser-textured steel surfaces in oscillating sliding contact with a steel ball. Two types of laser-textured patterns of microcavities were studied. It was found that, in comparison with smooth steel surfaces, the laser texturing significantly reduces friction and wear. The most significant improvement in the tribological performance was achieved with an oil of high viscosity combined with a texture comprising a low density of deep microcavities.

  • 2.
    Hoseini, Mohammed
    Hållfasthet (BMh).
    Tribological Investigation of Coatings for Artificial Joints2008In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 264, no 11-12, p. 958–966-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Lyphout, Christophe
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Bolelli, Giovanni
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Smazalova, Eva
    University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic.
    Sato, Kazuto
    Fujimi Incorp, Japan.
    Yamada, Junya
    Fujimi Incorp, Japan.
    Houdkova, Sarka
    University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic.
    Lusvarghi, Luca
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Manfredini, Tiziano
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Influence of hardmetal feedstock powder on the sliding wear and impact resistance of High Velocity Air-Fuel (HVAF)sprayed coatings2019In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 430-431, p. 340-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work aimed to clarify how the characteristics of WC-CoCr hardmetal feedstock powders, namely the grain size of the WC carbides and of the binder and the compressive strength of the sintered aggregates, affect the dry sliding wear and impact resistance of coatings deposited by High Velocity Air-Fuel (HVAF)spraying. Ball-on-Disc tests, which mimic a sliding wear process in the presence of hard asperities as it may occur e.g. in hydraulic seal joints or papermaking components, resulted in mild wear through near-surface microscale plastic flow, the exact nature of which was significantly affected by WC size. Finite element simulations of a single-asperity sliding process indeed showed that large WC grains concentrate contact stresses, thus undergoing very localised deformation. It is experimentally seen that repeated deformation of the carbide grains resulted in their cracking and pull-out. Uniformly distributed, fine carbides allowed the matrix to take on some stress, thus undergoing more homogeneous plastic flow. Block-on-Ring tests elicited adhesive wear as it may happen e.g. in metal-to-metal contacts (e.g. petrochemical valves). This could be effectively restrained by low matrix mean free path. Cyclic impact resistance of coarse-grained coatings was better than that of fine-grained ones, because of better large-scale cohesive strength.

  • 4. Stepien, M.
    et al.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Saarinen, J.J.
    Teisalo, H.
    Tuominen, M.
    Wear resistance of nanoparticle coatings on paperboard2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 307Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Zhu, Y
    et al.
    Olofsson, U
    Persson, Karin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Investigation of factors influencing wheel-rail adhesion using a mini-traction machine2012In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 292-293, p. 218-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adhesion in the wheel-rail contact is a key factor determining stable running conditions and safety during train driving and braking. This paper presents an experiment performed in a mini-traction machine to simulate the problems of low adhesion in the wheel-rail contact. Tests were conducted under dry conditions and using water or oil as lubricants to study the influence of surface roughness on the adhesion coefficient. The results indicate that the adhesion coefficient can be reduced to as low as 0.02 for smooth surfaces lubricated with water. For rougher contact surfaces, the water-lubricated tests indicate a higher adhesion coefficient than do oil-lubricated ones, but also a clear dependence on water temperature. The oil-lubricated tests indicate a very slight dependence of the adhesion coefficient on variation in rolling speed, temperature, and surface roughness.

  • 6.
    Ånmark, Niclas
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Björk, Thomas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB.
    Ganea, Anna
    Sandvik Coromant, Sweden.
    Ölund, Patrik
    Ovako, Sweden.
    Hogmark, Sture
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karasev, Andrey
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Pär Göran
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    The effect of inclusion composition on tool wear in hard part turning using PCBN cutting tools2015In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 334-335, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work reports on hard part turning of carburizing steels using a PCBN cutting tool in fine machining. Emphasis is on the link between composition of the inclusions in work material and wear mechanisms of the cutting tool. A Ca-treated machinability improved 20NiCrMo steel was included together with three other carburizing steels with different inclusion characteristics. Machining tests were conducted to examine cutting tool life and its balance between excessive flank wear and crater wear. The wear mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) and a secondary electron (SE) detector.The longest tool life was obtained when cutting the Ca-treated steel. The improved machinability is linked to the deposition of complex (Mn,Ca)S and (Ca,Al)(O,S) protective slag layers that form on the rake face of the cutting tool during machining. Cutting in this steel also resulted in a typical ridge formation in the tool edge crater. Transfer of workpiece material to the rake face crater is characteristic in hard part turning of steel with high cleanliness. This is suggested to be related to the lack of the sulfides that lubricate conventional machinability treated steels, and that the crater wear of low-sulfur steel is more pronounced than for steels with higher sulfur content.

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