Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brobbey, Kofi
    et al.
    Abo Akademi, Finland.
    Haapanen, Janne
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Tuominen, Mikko
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Mäkelä, Jyrki
    Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
    Gunell, Marianne
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Eerola, Erkki
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Saarinen, Jarkko
    University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Toivakka, Martti
    Abo Akademi, Finland.
    High-speed production of antibacterial fabrics using liquid flame spray2019In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) are known as one of the major problems of the modern healthcare system, which result in additional cost and mortality. It has also been shown that pathogenic bacteria are mostly transferred via surfaces in healthcare settings. Therefore, antibacterial surfaces, which include fabrics and textiles, can be used in a healthcare environment to reduce the transfer of pathogenic bacteria, hence reducing HAIs. Silver nanoparticles have been shown to have broad spectrum antibacterial properties, and therefore they have been incorporated into fabrics to provide antibacterial functionality. Liquid flame spray (LFS) nanoparticle synthesis allows nanoparticles to be produced and deposited on surfaces at speeds up to and beyond 300 m/min. Herein, LFS is used to deposit silver nanoparticles onto two fabrics that are commonly used in the hospital environment with the aim of producing antibacterial fabrics. A thin plasma coating on top of the fabrics after silver deposition is used to improve nanoparticle adhesion. Fabrics coated with silver nanoparticles demonstrated antibacterial properties against Escherichia coli. Nanoparticle imaging and surface chemical characterization are performed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highlights of this research are as follows: • high-speed synthesis and deposition of silver nanoparticles on fabrics; • plasma coating onto fabrics with silver nanoparticles; • antibacterial fabrics for potential use in healthcare environments. © The Author(s) 2019.

  • 2.
    Dural-Erem, Aysin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Wessman, Per
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Husmark, Ulrika
    SCA Hygiene Products AB, Sweden.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Biocontrol of solid surfaces in hospitals using microbial-based wipes2019In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 216-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hospital-acquired infections have become a major challenge which threaten the hospitalized patients’ safety. The presence of nosocomial pathogens is generally reported in connection with solid surfaces near patient environments. These surfaces become significant sources of transmission and lead most often to the contamination and cross-contamination of nosocomial pathogens to the patients and staff. This paper investigates strategies to apply beneficial bacteria on viscose-based nonwoven wipes and the viability of these beneficial bacteria on the wipes along with characterization of the physical properties of the wipes. Major findings include that it is possible to produce dry wipes which contain an adequate number of beneficial bacteria or spores. After these wipes are wetted, they can release a certain number of bacteria from the wetted wipes. These released beneficial bacteria can inhibit pathogens by growing and colonizing on the wiped surfaces.

  • 3.
    Malm, V.
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Strååt, Martin
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Walkenström, Pernilla
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Effects of surface structure and substrate color on color differences in textile coatings containing effect pigments2014In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Textiles with dynamically color-changing effects depending on the observation angle were achieved by applying a coating paste containing multicolor effect pigments using a knife-over-table coating method. Black and white textile substrates with different structure characteristics depending on yarn type (multifilament and spun) and thread count (high and low) were studied and compared to a paper test chart as a smooth reference. The influence of surface structures on effect pigment coatings were investigated and compared with TiO2 coatings. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the substrate surface roughness increased when constructed of multifilament yarns with high thread count, spun yarns with higher thread counts and spun yarns with lower thread counts. Multi-angle spectrophotometer measurements of effect pigment-coated samples showed that the color differences in form of the CIE L*a*b*-coordinates varied to great extents, depending on detection angles, surface roughness and color of the substrates, compared to TiO2-pigment coatings with insignificant color-changing effects. The parallel alignment of effect pigment platelets was more easily achieved on the test chart. As a result, the color-changing effect was less intense on coated textiles. The effect were approximately reduced by half when coated on a substrate constructed of spun yarns compared to one made of multifilament yarns. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  • 4.
    Malm, Veronica
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Walkenström, Pernilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Influence of rheology modifiers and coating parameters on the color-changing effects of textile coatings with multi-layered mica pigments2015In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 85, no 9, p. 936-948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to optimize the color-changing effects of textile knife-coatings containing multi-layered mica pigments (effect pigments; EPs), the properties and structure of the coating formulation/layer during and after application were investigated. Three pigment coating formulations were prepared by first mixing the EP dispersion into a water-based polyurethane binder. Different types of rheology modifiers (RMs), liquid dispersion of sodium polyacrylates (LDPSAP), hydrophobically alkali swellable emulsions (HASEs) and hydrophobically modified ethoxylated polyurethane, were then added to the dispersion. The rheological behavior of the coating formulations was characterized in terms of the shear rate dependence of the viscosity. The formulations were applied onto the same type of textile substrate using a knife-coating technique. The choice of RM as well as variations in gap height and coating speed increased the solids deposit. The increased amount of coating deposits (thicker coating layers) corresponded to more and better dispersed EPs within the coated layer as well as more horizontally oriented platelets as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Multi-angle spectrophotometer measurements showed that the CIE L*a*b* color coordinates varied strongly depending on detection angle. The variations of the absolute values of L* and a* were more pronounced between –15° and 15° detection angles, corresponding to angles with the greatest visual color changes. The slowly coated samples with higher solids deposit were measured to be lighter and of higher chroma compared to samples coated at a higher speed. Generally, the color-changing effects were governed by the choice of RM and coating parameters in terms of variations of the amount of coating deposited onto the samples.

  • 5.
    Wedin, Helena
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Lopes, Marta
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Sixta, Herbert
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Hummel, Michael
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Evaluation of post-consumer cellulosic textile waste for chemical recycling based on cellulose degree of polymerization and molar mass distribution2019In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of which end-of-life cellulosic textiles can be used for chemical recycling according to their composition, wear life and laundering—domestic versus service sector. For that purpose, end-of-life textiles were generated through laboratorial laundering of virgin fabrics under domestic and industrial conditions, and the cellulose content and its intrinsic viscosity and molar mass distribution were measured in all samples after two, 10, 20, and 50 laundering cycles. Results presented herein also address the knowledge gap concerning polymer properties of end-of-life man-made cellulosic fabrics—viscose and Lyocell. The results show that post-consumer textiles from the home consumer sector, using domestic laundering, can be assumed to have a similar, or only slightly lower, degree of polymerization than the virgin textiles (−15%). Post-consumer textiles from the service sector, using industrial laundering, can be assumed to have a substantially lower degree of polymerization. An approximate decrease of up to 80% of the original degree of polymerization can be expected when they are worn out. A higher relative decrease for cotton than man-made cellulosic textiles is expected. Furthermore, in these laboratorial laundering trials, no evidence evolved that the cellulose content in blended polyester fabrics would be significantly affected by domestic or industrial laundering. With respect to molar mass distribution, domestic post-consumer cotton waste seems to be the most suitable feedstock for chemical textile recycling using Lyocell-type processes, although a pre-treatment step might be required to remove contaminants and lower the intrinsic viscosity to 400–500 ml/g. © The Author(s) 2019.

  • 6.
    Åkerfeldt, M.
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Strååt, Martin
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Walkenström, Pernilla
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Electrically conductive textile coating with a PEDOT-PSS dispersion and a polyurethane binder2013In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 618-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrically conductive textile coatings have been prepared by the addition of a dispersion of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT-PSS) and ethylene glycol to a polyurethane-based coating formulation. The formulations were designed to have similar viscosities, measured with a rheometer using a cone-and-plate set-up. The formulations were applied to woven poly(ethylene) terephthalate substrates using a direct coating method. The concentration PEDOT-PSS in the finished coatings varied between 0.7 and 6.2 wt%, the coating deposit between 19 and 155 g/m2 and the drying procedure between 4 hours at 20°C and 10 minutes at 150°C. Surface resistivity was measured with a ring probe and surface topology was addressed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The PEDOT-PSS concentration had a large effect on the resistivity, which dropped by five orders of magnitude with an increased concentration. The steepest decrease occurred between 1 and 3 wt% PEDOT-PSS, indicating a percolation threshold. An increased coating deposit resulted in a resistivity drop by a factor 10, but no significant effect on the resistivity of the samples could be ascertained by variation of the drying conditions when samples had been subjected to subsequent annealing. © The Author(s) 2013.

  • 7.
    Åkerfeldt, M.
    et al.
    University of Borås.
    Strååt, Martin
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Walkenström, Pernilla
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Influence of coating parameters on textile and electrical properties of a poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate)/polyurethane-coated textile2013In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 83, no 20, p. 2164-2176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile coatings with electrical conductivity were obtained by the addition of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and ethylene glycol (EG) to a polyurethane (PU)-based coating formulation. Variations of the coating formulation, the coating amount and the drying conditions, as well as the absence of an annealing step, were investigated. The coated fabrics were evaluated for tear strength and bending rigidity as well as surface resistivity and appearance before and after Martindale abrasion. A high proportion of PEDOT:PSS dispersion in the formulation and the presence of EG provided low surface resistivity. This composition resulted in softer samples with higher tear strength than those containing more PU-binder. All coatings proved to withstand abrasion to a similar extent. The surface resistivity increased gradually with the abrasion, about one half order of magnitude, except for those coatings that had been subjected to a faster drying process, where the surface resistivity increased somewhat faster. © The Author(s) 2013.

  • 8.
    Åkerfeldt, Maria
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lund, Anja
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Walkenström, Pernilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Textile sensing glove with piezoelectric PVDF fibers and printed electrodes of PEDOT:PSS2015In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 85, no 17, p. 1789-1799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of an entirely polymer-based motion sensing glove with possible applications, for example, in physical rehabilitation is described. The importance of comfort for the wearer and the possibility to clean the glove in normal laundering processes were important aspects in the development. The glove is all textile and manufactured using materials and methods suitable for standard textile industry processes. For the first time, melt-spun piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers with conductive cores were machine embroidered onto a textile glove to function as a sensor element. Electrodes and electrical interconnections were constituted by a screen printed conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) formulation. The screen printing of the interconnections was shown to be a reliable method for reproducible material deposition, resulting in an average surface resistivity value of 57 Ω/square. A repeated strain of 10% only influenced the resistance of the interconnections initially and to a very limited extent. The influence of washing on the electrical resistance of the printed interconnections was also studied; after 15 wash cycles the average surface resistivity was still below 500 Ω/square, which was deemed sufficient for the polymeric sensor system to remain functional during long-term use. Sensor data from the glove was also successfully used as input to a microcontroller running a robot gripper, in order to demonstrate its potential applications.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7