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  • 1.
    Campodoni, Elisabetta
    et al.
    Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics-National Research Council (ISTEC-CNR), Italy.
    Heggset, Ellinor B
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, PFI.
    Rashad, Ahmad
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gloria B.
    Universidad de Granada, Spain.
    Mustafa, Kamal
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, PFI. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Tampieri, Anna
    Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics-National Research Council (ISTEC-CNR), Italy.
    Sandri, Monica
    Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics-National Research Council (ISTEC-CNR), Italy.
    Polymeric 3D scaffolds for tissue regeneration: Evaluation of biopolymer nanocomposite reinforced with cellulose nanofibrils2019In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 94, p. 867-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biopolymers such as gelatin (Gel) and cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) have many of the essential requirements for being used as scaffolding materials in tissue regeneration; biocompatibility, surface chemistry, ability to generate homogeneous hydrogels and 3D structures with suitable pore size and interconnection, which allows cell colonization and proliferation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the mechanical behaviour of the Gel matrix can be improved by means of functionalization with cellulose nanofibrils and proper cross-linking treatments. Blending processes were developed to achieve a polymer nanocomposite incorporating the best features of both biopolymers: biomimicry of the Gel and structural reinforcement by the CNF. The designed 3D structures underline interconnected porosity achieved by freeze-drying process, improved mechanical properties and chemical stability that are tailored by CNF addition and different cross-linking approaches. In vitro evaluations reveal the preservation of the biocompatibility of Gel and its good interaction with cells by promoting cell colonization and proliferation. The results support the addition of cellulose nanofibrils to improve the mechanical behaviour of 3D porous structures suitable as scaffolding for tissue regeneration.

  • 2.
    Cieślik, M.
    et al.
    Jagiellonian University, Poland.
    Kot, M.
    AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland.
    Reczyński, W.
    AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland.
    Engvall, Klas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB.
    Rakowski, W.
    AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland.
    Kotarba, A.
    Jagiellonian University, Poland.
    Parylene coatings on stainless steel 316L surface for medical applications: Mechanical and protective properties2012In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 31-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical and protective properties of parylene N and C coatings (2-20 μm) on stainless steel 316L implant materials were investigated. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron and confocal microscopes, microindentation and scratch tests, whereas their protective properties were evaluated in terms of quenching metal ion release from stainless steel to simulated body fluid (Hanks solution). The obtained results revealed that for parylene C coatings, the critical load for initial cracks is 3-5 times higher and the total metal ions release is reduced 3 times more efficiently compared to parylene N. It was thus concluded that parylene C exhibits superior mechanical and protective properties for application as a micrometer coating material for stainless steel implants. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Rashad, Ahmad
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Suliman, Salwa
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Mustafa, Manal
    Oral Health Centre of Expertise in Western Norway, Norway.
    Pedersen, Torbjörn
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Campodoni, Elisabetta
    National Research Council of Italy, Italy.
    Sandri, Monica
    National Research Council of Italy, Italy.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, PFI. NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Mustafa, Kamal
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Inflammatory responses and tissue reactions to wood-Based nanocellulose scaffolds2019In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 97, p. 208-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two wood-derived cellulose nanofibril (CNF) porous scaffolds were prepared by TEMPO-oxidation and carboxymethylation. The effects of these scaffolds on the production of inflammatory cytokines by human macrophage-like cells (U937) was profiled in vitro after 1 and 3 days and in subcutaneous tissues of rats after 4 and 30 days, using PCR and Multiplex arrays. Tissue culture plates (TCP) and gelatin scaffolds served as controls in vitro and in vivo respectively. After 3 days in vitro, there was no significant difference between the effects of CNF scaffolds and TCP on the production of chemokines/growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines. At day 4 in vivo there was significantly higher gene expression of the anti-inflammatory IL-1Ra in the CNF scaffolds than the gelatin scaffold. Production of IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, MIP-1α CXCL-1 and M-CSF was significantly less than in the gelatin, demonstrating an early mild inflammatory response. At day 30, both CNF scaffolds significantly stimulated the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Unlike gelatin, neither CNF scaffold had degraded 180 days post-implantation. The slow degradation of CNF scaffolds resulted in a foreign body reaction, with high production of IL-1β, IL-2, TNF-α, IFN-ϒ, MCP-1, MIP-1α, M-CSF, VEGF cytokines and expression of MMP-9 gene. The surface chemistry of the CNF scaffolds elicited a modest effect on cytokine production and did not shift the inflammatory profile in vitro or in vivo. The decisive role in development of the foreign body reaction was the slow degradation of the CNF scaffolds.

  • 4.
    Stenhamre, H.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Thorvaldsson, Anna
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Enochson, L.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Walkenström, Pernilla
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Lindahl, A.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Brittberg, M.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Gatenholm, P.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Nanosized fibers' effect on adult human articular chondrocytes behavior2013In: Materials science & engineering. C, biomimetic materials, sensors and systems, ISSN 0928-4931, E-ISSN 1873-0191, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 1539-1545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue engineering with chondrogenic cell based therapies is an expanding field with the intention of treating cartilage defects. It has been suggested that scaffolds used in cartilage tissue engineering influence cellular behavior and thus the long-term clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to assess whether chondrocyte attachment, proliferation and post-expansion re-differentiation could be influenced by the size of the fibers presented to the cells in a scaffold. Polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds with different fiber morphologies were produced, i.e. microfiber (MS) scaffolds as well as nanofiber-coated microfiber scaffold (NMS). Adult human articular chondrocytes were cultured in the scaffolds in vitro up to 28 days, and the resulting constructs were assessed histologically, immunohistochemically, and biochemically. Attachment of cells and serum proteins to the scaffolds was affected by the architecture. The results point toward nano-patterning onto the microfibers influencing proliferation of the chondrocytes, and the overall 3D environment having a greater influence on the re-differentiation. In the efforts of finding the optimal scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering, studies as the current contribute to the knowledge of how to affect and control chondrocytes behavior. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All Rights Reserved.

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