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  • 1.
    Alriksson, Björn
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Processum.
    Hörnberg, Andreas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Gudnason, Asgeir Eirikur
    Saebyli Ehf, Iceland.
    Knobloch, Stephen
    Matis, Iceland.
    Arnason, Jon
    Matis, Iceland.
    Johannsson, Ragnar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Fish feed from wood2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, p. 843-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased demand of fish in combination with overexploitation of the fish stocks of the oceans has led to an increased production of fish through aquaculture. Today, fishmeal is the main protein source in fish feed for most aquaculture species. However, fishmeal is soon expected to fall short of demand as its production is associated with environmental problems. This shortage must therefore be met by sustainable alternative protein sources. Protein-rich microorganisms (i.e. Single cell protein) is an interesting option as a fishmeal substitute in fish feed which, in addition, can be produced as an important co-product in wood-based biorefineries. In the current study, four different microorganisms were cultivated on five different residual streams from Swedish wood-based biorefineries. Screening experiments were carried out in shake flasks, optimization experiments in benchtop bioreactors, and scale-up experiments were performed in a 50-litre pilot bioreactor. In addition, a demo-scale experiment was carried out in the Swedish Biorefinery Demo Plant. Microbial biomass from the scale-up experiments was collected and used for production of different fish feed formulations which, in turn, were used in feeding trials of the freshwater fish Tilapia. Fishes fed with feed, in which part of the fishmeal had been substituted with Single cell protein, showed similar or better growth than fishes fed with a fishmeal-based control feed.

  • 2. Chacha, N.
    et al.
    Toven, K
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Mtui, G
    Katima, J
    Mrema, G
    Steam Pretreatment of Pine (Pinus patula) wood residue for the production of reducing sugars2011In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 45, p. 495-501Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Danielsson, Sverker
    RISE, Innventia.
    Sorption and desorption of black liquor xylan onto cellulose fibers2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 819-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of xylan as a polymer in different new materials is large and not yet utilized. The availability in kraft pulp mills is large as the polymeric xylan dissolved in process liquors corresponds to up to 160 kg/adt and is today burnt to recover energy. A pre-requisite for using black liquor xylan in high-value products is to purify it from inorganic material and lignin in a technically effective and economical feasible way. This study combines two known properties of xylan: its affinity to cellulose and its solubility in alkali. The aim is to design an efficient separation process to produce black liquor xylan of high purity. A very pure xylan was reached with as low lignin contents as 1%. The hydroxide ion concentration was varied in the sorption step and it was found that an increase in hydroxide ion concentration resulted in a decreased amount of isolated xylan, decreased degree of substitution of uronic acids, but no effect on the lignin content and ash content was seen.

  • 4.
    Deshpande, Raghe
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019). Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Sundvall, Lars
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019).
    Grundberg, H.
    Domsjö Fabriker, Sweden.
    Germgård, U.
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Initial phase of sodium bisulphite pulping of spruce. Part I2016In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sodium bisulphite cooking study has been performed on spruce chips with the aim of monitoring the impregnation and the initial phase of such a cook performed at pH 4.5. Both pulp and liquor analyses have been carried out and the experiments have been done with a laboratory-prepared cooking acid, in comparison with a mill cooking acid. The pulping experiments have been performed down to a total pulp yield of 60%. The objective was to verify and extend the current knowledge of bisulphite pulping with a focus on the initial phase of the cook. With the help of a kinetic model that has been developed in the project, the pulp composition during the cook with respect to cellulose, lignin, glucomannan and xylan can now be predicted. The side reactions with respect to thiosulphate formation were also analyzed in this study.

  • 5.
    Ek, Monica
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Chirat, Christine
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Fogelström, Linda
    Grenoble INP-Pagora, France.
    Iversen, Tommy
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Li, Dongfang
    RISE, Innventia.
    Malmström, Eva E.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Norström, Emelie
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sixta, Herbert
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Testova, Lidia
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Wawro, Dariusz
    IBWCh Institute of Biopolymer and Chemical Fibres, Poland.
    Wobama - Wood based materials and fuels2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 773-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    WOBAMA - Wood Based Materials and Fuels is a biorefinery oriented scientific research project supported by Wood Wisdom-Net Research Programme and ERA-NET Bioenergy. In this project, the wood based raw materials were converted to a range of value added products through unconventional techniques. So far, many demonstrators have been prepared, such as the dissolving pulps with high cellulose content, the regenerated cellulose films with high tenacity, the hydrophobic materials based on cellulose and birch bark suberin, as well as the adhesives based on polysaccharides.

  • 6.
    Gulbrandsen, Torea A.
    et al.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Johnsen, Ingvild A.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Opedal, Mihaela Tanase
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Toven, Kai
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Øyaas, Karin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Pranovich, Andrey V.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Mikkola, Jyri Pekka T.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hoff, Bård H.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Extracting hemicelluloses from softwood and bagasse as oligosaccharides using pure water and microwave heating2015In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 117-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to identify conditions for hemicelluloses extraction in oligomeric form. Using microwave assisted hot water extraction (HWE), the effects of both retention time and temperature on hemicelluloses yields, as well as the degree of polymerization (DP) as analyzed by SEC-MALLS, were investigated using both softwood (sawmill shavings) and sugarcane bagasse. The results are discussed in the light of the unavoidable yield-DP compromise resulting from the application of batch mode operations. Nevertheless, significant differences between the two raw materials could be observed, as expected. For softwood shavings, data interpolation indicated that about 50% of the hemicelluloses could be obtained as oligomers at an average DP of 30 when extracted at 183 °C for 5 minutes. For bagasse, longer extraction times seemed optimal. After hot water extraction at 183 °C for 12 minutes, about 62% of the bagasse hemicelluloses were extracted as oligomers at an average DP of about 100.

  • 7.
    Jansson, Mikael
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berglin, Niklas
    RISE, Innventia.
    Olm, Leelo
    RISE, Innventia.
    Second generation ethanol through alkaline fractionation of pine and aspen wood2010In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 44, no 1-3, p. 47-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pre-treatment studies on pine and aspen wood with alkaline fractionation were performed, the experimental results obtained being used as input for assessing the conversion of an existing pulp mill to ethanol and lignin production. By the LignoBoost process, the extracted lignin could be used in the lime kiln to replace fuel oil, while the lignin not needed in the lime kiln could be sold as a by-product. In addition to fuel applications, lignin could be used in a wide range of bio-based product applications, which would increase the value of the extracted lignin and increase the total revenues. A WinGEMS model was used to calculate mass and energy balances, and the results were used for an economic evaluation of the concept. The assessment indicated that the proposed alkaline concept would have reasonable production costs from both pine and aspen wood, comparable with the bioethanol produced from grain in Northern Europe today, i.e. about 0.45 ε/L ethanol (∌5 SEK/L). The production rate of a typical mill producing 1000 tonnes of pulp per day before conversion would be in the order of 140 000 m 3 of ethanol per year, as depending on the raw wood material. The corresponding lignin production would range from 25 000 to 63 000 tonnes per year. The use of alkaline delignification to produce a substrate with low lignin content for the enzymatic hydrolysis builds entirely on known and well-proven technology, yet it needs to be further developed. The process chain from enzymatic hydrolysis to ethanol is very similar to that used today for grain ethanol. Altogether, the technical risk should therefore be low.

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  • 8.
    Karlström, Katarina
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Sjögren, Birger
    RISE, Innventia.
    Vorwerg, Waltraud
    Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP, Germany.
    Volkert, Bert
    Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP, Germany.
    Sulphur-free cooking for value added cellulose2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 781-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study sulphur- and chlorine-free processes to produce pulps for triacetylation and preparation of films for LCD screen application was one of the aims in the EU project AFORE. It was shown possible to produce pulp suitable for triacetylation from Eucalyptus globulus chips with pre-hydrolysis soda cooking and a single oxygen delignification step. Pre-hydrolysis with water at elevated temperatures extracts wood components, mainly hemicelluloses and the wood matrix is opened to facilitate alkaline pulping. After a severe pre-hydrolysis extracting some 25% of the wood raw material, a subsequent soda cook reduces the lignin content to about 1%. The oxygen delignification step produces a pulp with low lignin content, kappa no 1.4, and low hemicelluloses content, < 2 wt% xylose. The resulting cellulose had high molar mass and produced highly transparent triacetate solutions. It was also possible to produce a transparent cellulose triacetate film by solution casting with good physical properties without using plasticizer. The process also results in a sulphur-free black-liquor suitable for lignin separation by the LignoBoost process. The resulting lignin is of high purity with low hemicelluloses content.

  • 9.
    Ziesig, Rufus
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Tomani, Per E.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Theliander, Hans
    RISE, Innventia. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Production of a pure lignin product part 2: Separation of lignin from membrane filtration permeates of black liquor2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 805-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future high value lignin-based products, such as carbon fibers, require a lignin raw material with a high purity level. Lignin with low inorganic content can be separated from kraft black liquor by the LignoBoost process. This laboratory scale study focuses on the effect of micro- and ultrafiltration of black liquor on the content of impurities in the LignoBoost lignin. Two black liquors, obtained from pulping of eucalyptus and softwood, were used in this study. The black liquors were micro- and ultrafiltered and thereafter lignin was separated from these permeates according to the LignoBoost process. It was found that micro- and ultrafiltration significantly reduced the amounts of carbohydrate residuals in the separated lignin. Eucalyptus lignin separated from permeates contained similar amounts of Al, Mn, Mg, Fe and Si, but significantly less Ca than the reference sample separated from unfiltered black liquor, resulting in 50% lower ash content. Softwood lignin separated from permeates contained lower amounts of Al, Mn, Mg, Fe, Ca and Si than the reference. In both cases, the Na and K content were unaffected by the introduction of micro- and ultrafiltration.

1 - 9 of 9
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