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  • 1.
    Alriksson, Björn
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Processum.
    Hörnberg, Andreas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Processum.
    Fish feed from wood2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 843-848Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Alriksson, Björn
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Processum.
    Hörnberg, Andreas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Gudnason, Asgeir Eirikur
    Saebyli Ehf, Iceland.
    Knobloch, Stephen
    Matis, Iceland.
    Arnason, Jon
    Matis, Iceland.
    Johannsson, Ragnar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Fish feed from wood2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, p. 843-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased demand of fish in combination with overexploitation of the fish stocks of the oceans has led to an increased production of fish through aquaculture. Today, fishmeal is the main protein source in fish feed for most aquaculture species. However, fishmeal is soon expected to fall short of demand as its production is associated with environmental problems. This shortage must therefore be met by sustainable alternative protein sources. Protein-rich microorganisms (i.e. Single cell protein) is an interesting option as a fishmeal substitute in fish feed which, in addition, can be produced as an important co-product in wood-based biorefineries. In the current study, four different microorganisms were cultivated on five different residual streams from Swedish wood-based biorefineries. Screening experiments were carried out in shake flasks, optimization experiments in benchtop bioreactors, and scale-up experiments were performed in a 50-litre pilot bioreactor. In addition, a demo-scale experiment was carried out in the Swedish Biorefinery Demo Plant. Microbial biomass from the scale-up experiments was collected and used for production of different fish feed formulations which, in turn, were used in feeding trials of the freshwater fish Tilapia. Fishes fed with feed, in which part of the fishmeal had been substituted with Single cell protein, showed similar or better growth than fishes fed with a fishmeal-based control feed.

  • 3. Chacha, N.
    et al.
    Toven, K
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Mtui, G
    Katima, J
    Mrema, G
    Steam Pretreatment of Pine (Pinus patula) wood residue for the production of reducing sugars2011In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 45, p. 495-501Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Danielsson, S.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Sorption and desorption of black liquor xylan onto cellulose fibers2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 819-823Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Ek, M.
    et al.
    Chirat, C.
    Fogelström, L.
    Iversen, T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Li, D.
    Malmström, E.
    Norström, E.
    Sixta, H.
    Testova, L.
    Wawro, D.
    Wobama - Wood based materials and fuels2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 773-779Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Jansson, Mikael
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berglin, Niklas
    RISE, Innventia.
    Olm, Leelo
    RISE, Innventia.
    Second generation ethanol through alkaline fractionation of pine and aspen wood2010In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 44, no 1-3, p. 47-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pre-treatment studies on pine and aspen wood with alkaline fractionation were performed, the experimental results obtained being used as input for assessing the conversion of an existing pulp mill to ethanol and lignin production. By the LignoBoost process, the extracted lignin could be used in the lime kiln to replace fuel oil, while the lignin not needed in the lime kiln could be sold as a by-product. In addition to fuel applications, lignin could be used in a wide range of bio-based product applications, which would increase the value of the extracted lignin and increase the total revenues. A WinGEMS model was used to calculate mass and energy balances, and the results were used for an economic evaluation of the concept. The assessment indicated that the proposed alkaline concept would have reasonable production costs from both pine and aspen wood, comparable with the bioethanol produced from grain in Northern Europe today, i.e. about 0.45 ε/L ethanol (∌5 SEK/L). The production rate of a typical mill producing 1000 tonnes of pulp per day before conversion would be in the order of 140 000 m 3 of ethanol per year, as depending on the raw wood material. The corresponding lignin production would range from 25 000 to 63 000 tonnes per year. The use of alkaline delignification to produce a substrate with low lignin content for the enzymatic hydrolysis builds entirely on known and well-proven technology, yet it needs to be further developed. The process chain from enzymatic hydrolysis to ethanol is very similar to that used today for grain ethanol. Altogether, the technical risk should therefore be low.

  • 7.
    Karlström, K.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Sjögren, B.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Vorwerg, W.
    Volkert, B.
    Sulphur-free cooking for value added cellulose2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 781-786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ziesig, R.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Tomani, P.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Theliander, H.
    Production of a pure lignin product part 2: Separation of lignin from membrane filtration permeates of black liquor2014In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 48, no 9-10, p. 805-811Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
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