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  • 1.
    Fooladgar, Ehsan
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Tóth, Pal
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center. Institute of Physical Metallurgy, Hungary.
    Duwig, Christophe
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Characterization of flameless combustion in a model gas turbine combustor using a novel post-processing tool2019In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 204, p. 356-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flameless combustion is a very promising technology for the future gas turbines. It is clean and stable—without large oscillations, noise and flashback. To facilitate the adoption of this technology in gas turbines, advanced design tools are needed. In this paper, a recently developed unsupervised post-processing tool is used to analyze the large amount of high-dimensional data produced in a series of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of a model gas turbine operating in flameless mode. Simulations are performed using Finite Rate Chemistry (FRC) combustion modeling and a detailed description of chemistry. The automatic post-processing reveals important features of the combustion process that are not easily recognizable by other methods, making it a complementary step for the already established FRC–LES approach, and a potential design tool for advanced combustion systems.

  • 2.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Gebart, Rikard
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Bostrom, D.
    Nordin, Anders
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Ohman, M.
    High-temperature aerosol formation in wood pellets flames: Spatially resolved measurements2006In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 147, no 4, p. 278-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation and evolution of high-temperature aerosols during fixed bed combustion of wood pellets in a realistic combustion environment were investigated through spatially resolved experiments. The purpose of this work was to investigate the various stages of aerosol formation from the hot flame zone to the flue gas channel. The investigation is important both for elucidation of the formation mechanisms and as a basis for development and validation of particle formation models that can be used for design optimization. Experiments were conducted in an 8-kW-updraft fired-wood-pellets combustor. Particle samples were withdrawn from the centerline of the combustor through 10 sampling ports by a rapid dilution sampling probe. The corresponding temperatures at the sampling positions were in the range 200-1450 °C. The particle sample was size-segregated in a low-pressure impactor, allowing physical and chemical resolution of the fine particles. The chemical composition of the particles was investigated by SEM/EDS and XRD analysis. Furthermore, the experimental results were compared to theoretical models for aerosol formation processes. The experimental data show that the particle size distribution has two peaks, both of which are below an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5). The mode diameters of the fine and coarse modes in the PM2.5 region were ∼0.1 and ∼ 0.8   μm, respectively. The shape of the particle size distribution function continuously changes with position in the reactor due to several mechanisms. Early, in the flame zone, both the fine mode and the coarse mode in the PM2.5 region were dominated by particles from incomplete combustion, indicated by a significant amount of carbon in the particles. The particle concentrations of both the fine and the coarse mode decrease rapidly in the hot oxygen-rich flame due to oxidation of the carbon-rich particles. After the hot flame, the fine mode concentration and particle diameter increase gradually when the temperature of the flue gas drops. The main contribution to this comes from condensation on preexisting particles in the gas of alkali sulfates, alkali chlorides, and Zn species formed from constituents vaporized in the fuel bed. The alkali sulfates were found to condense at a temperature of ∼ 950 ° C and alkali chlorides condensed later at ∼ 600 ° C. This agrees well with results of chemical equilibrium calculation of the gas-to-particle conversion temperature. After the hot flame the coarse mode concentration decreased very little when the flue gas was cooled. In addition to carbon, the coarse mode consists of refractory metals and also considerable amounts of alkali. © 2006 The Combustion Institute.

  • 3.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Öhrman, Olov .G.W
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Carlsson, Per
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
    Stjernberg, J.
    Characterisation of submicron particles produced during oxygen blown entrained flow gasification of biomass2014In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 161, no 7, p. 1923-1934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper submicron particles sampled after the quench during 200kW, 2bar(a) pressurised, oxygen blown gasification of three biomass fuels, pure stem wood of pine and spruce, bark from spruce and a bark mixture, have been characterised with respect to particle size distribution with a low pressure cascade impactor. The particles were also characterised for morphology and elemental composition by a combination of scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy/selected area electron diffraction pattern (HRTEM/EDS/SAED) techniques. The resulting particle concentration in the syngas after the quench varied between 46 and 289mg/Nm3 consisting of both carbon and easily volatile ash forming element significantly depending on the fuel ash content. Several different types of particles could be identified from classic soot particles to pure metallic zinc particles depending on the individual particle relation of carbon and ash forming elements. The results also indicate that ash forming elements and especially zinc interacts in the soot formation process creating a particle with shape and microstructure significantly different from a classical soot particle. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  • 4.
    Winikka, Henrik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Toth, Pal
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center. University of Miskolc, Hungary.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Molinder, Roger
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Sandström, Linda
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Lighty, JoAnn S.
    University of Utah, USA.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, ETC Energy Technology Center.
    Particle formation during pressurized entrained flow gasification of wood powder: Effects of process conditions on chemical composition, nanostructure, and reactivity2018In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 189, p. 1339-1351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of operating condition on particle formation during pressurized, oxygen blown gasification of wood powder with an ash content of 0.4 wt% was investigated. The investigation was performed with a pilot scale gasifier operated at 7 bar(a). Two loads, 400 and 600 kW were tested, with the oxygen equivalence ratio (λ) varied between 0.25 and 0.50. Particle concentration and mass size distribution was analyzed with a low pressure cascade impactor and the collected particles were characterized for morphology, elemental composition, nanostructure, and reactivity using scanning electron microscopy/high resolution transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. In order to quantify the nanostructure of the particles and identify prevalent sub-structures, a novel image analysis framework was used. It was found that the process temperature, affected both by λ and the load of the gasifier, had a significant influence on the particle formation processes. At low temperature (1060 °C), the formed soot particles seemed to be resistant to the oxidation process; however, when the oxidation process started at 1119 °C, the internal burning of the more reactive particle core began. A further increase in temperature (> 1313 °C) lead to the oxidation of the less reactive particle shell. When the shell finally collapsed due to severe oxidation, the original soot particle shape and nanostructure also disappeared and the resulting particle could not be considered as a soot anymore. Instead, the particle shape and nanostructure at the highest temperatures (> 1430 °C) were a function of the inorganic content and of the inorganic elements the individual particle consisted of. All of these effects together lead to the soot particles in the real gasifier environment having less and less ordered nanostructure and higher and higher reactivity as the temperature increased; i.e., they followed the opposite trend of what is observed during laboratory-scale studies with fuels not containing any ash-forming elements and where the temperature was not controlled by λ.

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