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  • 1.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Lingnert, Hans
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Kinetic studies of oxygen dependence during initial lipid oxidation in rapeseed oil1999In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 262-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipid oxidation was studied in rapeseed oil, stored at 35 or 50°C in 0.03, 0.3, 1.0 or 1.8% oxygen for 42 days. Peroxide value (PV), oxygen consumption, tocopherol consumption and production of volatile compounds were analyzed to follow the oxidation. At 50°C, lipid oxidation measured as oxygen consumption or PV was only slightly influenced by oxygen concentration ?1%. Below 0.5% the influence was strongly enhanced. The production of volatiles showed different relationships to oxygen concentration and some compounds were produced in larger amounts at lower O2, than at higher O2 concentrations.

  • 2.
    Eliasson, Lovisa
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Libander, Patrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Lövenklev, Maria
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Isaksson, Sven
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Infrared Decontamination of Oregano: Effects on Bacillus cereus Spores, Water Activity, Color, and Volatile Compounds2014In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 79, no 12, p. E2447-E2455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infrared (IR) heating, a novel technology for decontaminating oregano, was evaluated by investigating the reduction of inoculated Bacillus cereus spores and the effect on water activity (aw), color, and headspace volatile compounds after exposure to IR treatment. Conditioned oregano (aw 0.88) was IR-treated in a closed heating unit at 90 and 100 °C for holding times of 2 and 10 min, respectively. The most successful reduction in B. cereus spore numbers (5.6 log units) was achieved after a holding time of 10 min at 90 °C, while treatment at 100 °C for the same time resulted in a lower reduction efficiency (4.7 log units). The lower reduction at 100 °C was probably due to a reduced aw (aw 0.76) during IR treatment or possibly to the alteration or loss of volatile compounds possessing antimicrobial properties. The green color of oregano was only slightly affected, while the composition of volatile compounds was clearly altered by IR heating. However, two of the key aroma compounds, carvacrol and thymol, were only slightly affected, compared to the effect on the other studied compounds, indicating that the typical oregano aroma can likely be preserved. In conclusion, IR heating shows potential for the successful decontamination of oregano without severe alteration of its color or the key aroma compounds, carvacrol and thymol. Practical Application: This study investigated the potential of infrared heating as a technology for decontaminating oregano. The study outcome contributes to the development of new decontamination solutions to improve the sensory and microbial quality of herbs and spices.

  • 3.
    Guiamba, Isabel R. F.
    et al.
    Eduardo Mondlane University, Moçambique; Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Svanberg, Ulf
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience, Processing. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Effect of Infrared Blanching on Enzyme Activity and Retention of β-Carotene and Vitamin C in Dried Mango2015In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 80, no 6, p. E1235-E1242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this work were to evaluate infrared (IR) dry blanching in comparison with conventional water blanching prior to hot air drying of mango to inactivate polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) enzymes, and to study its effect on color change and retention of vitamin C and β‐carotene. Mango cylinders were blanched under similar temperature–time conditions either by IR heating or by immersion in a water bath during 2 min at 90 °C (high‐temperature‐short‐time—HTST) or for 10 min at 65 °C (low‐temperature‐long‐time—LTLT). After blanching mango was hot air dried at 70 °C. PPO was completely inactivated during the blanching treatments, but AAO had a moderate remaining activity after LTLT treatment (∼30%) and a low remaining activity after HTST treatment (9% to 15%). A higher retention of vitamin C was observed in mango subjected to IR dry blanching, 88.3 ± 1.0% (HTST) and 69.2 ± 2.9% (LTLT), compared with water blanching, 61.4 ± 5.3% (HTST) and 50.7 ± 9.6% (LTLT). All‐trans‐β‐carotene retention was significantly higher in water blanched dried mango, 93.2 ± 5.2% (LTLT) and 91.4 ± 5.1% (HTST), compared with IR dry blanched, 73.6 ± 3.6% (LTLT) and 76.9 ± 2.9% (HTST). Increased levels of 13‐cis‐β‐carotene isomer were detected only in IR dry blanched mango, and the corresponding dried mango also had a slightly darker color. IR blanching of mango prior to drying can improve the retention of vitamin C, but not the retention of carotenoids, which showed to be more dependent on the temperature than the blanching process. A reduction of drying time was observed in LTLT IR‐blanching mango.

  • 4. Ingemansson, T.
    et al.
    Petersson, A.
    Kaufmann, P.
    Lipid hydrolysis and oxidation related to astaxanthin content in light and dark muscle of frozen stored rainbow trout (oncorbynchus mykiss)1993In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 513-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Astaxanthin decreased significantly during frozen storage in both light and dark muscle of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Astaxanthin sunolementation did not affect lipid hydrolysis and oxidation during frozen storage of fish muscle. Dkposiiion of astaxanthin was higher in dark muscle than in light muscle. Astaxanthin decreased in both supplemented and nonsupplemented fish. The sum of transastaxanthin and its cis-isomers decreased during frozen storage, indicating mechanisms other than trans-cis isomerization were causes.? -Tocopherol decreased to the same extent in both light and dark muscle for both diets.

  • 5. Johansson, F.
    et al.
    Leufven, A.
    Concentration and interactive effects on the sorption of aroma liquids and vapors into polypropylene1997In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 355-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sorption of hexyl acetate and ethyl butyrate into polypropylene from vapors and 40% ethanol solution was studied. The effect of concentration and interactions with co-sorbants was investigated. The vapors were sorbed in amounts that were related to feed concentrations, without any interactive effects of co-sorbants, in the concentration range (i.e. 0.12-3.4 ?g/mL) and the mixtures investigated Compounds from a dissolved mixture, on the other hand, were generally sorbed in smaller amounts than from a single compound solution. Hexyl acetate was sorbed in larger amounts from a mixture of five compounds at high concentration (i.e. 1000 ?g/mL each) than when it was the sole solute.

  • 6.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
    et al.
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Svelander, C.
    Bialek, L.
    Schumm, S.
    Langton, Maud
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Rheology and Microstructure of Carrot and Tomato Emulsions as a Result of High-Pressure Homogenization Conditions2011In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 76, no 1, p. E130-E140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-pressure homogenization, as a way to further mechanically disrupt plant cells and cell walls compared to conventional blending, has been applied to thermally treated and comminuted carrot and tomato material in the presence of 5% olive oil. Mixes of both vegetables in a 1:1 ratio were also included. Both the effect of homogenization pressure and the effect of multiple process cycles were studied. The different microstructures generated were linked to different rheological properties analyzed by oscillatory and steady state measurements. The results showed that while carrot tissue requires a high shear input to be disrupted into cells and cell fragments, tomato cells were broken across the cell walls already at moderate shear input, and the nature of the tomato particles changed to amorphous aggregates, probably composed of cell contents and cell wall polymers. All the plant stabilized emulsions generated were stable against creaming under centrifugation. While for tomato a low-pressure multiple cycle and a high-pressure single-cycle process led to comparable microstructures and rheological properties, carrot showed different rheological properties after these treatments linked to differences in particle morphology. Mixes of carrot and tomato showed similar rheological properties after homogenizing in a single or in a split-stream process. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Katarina
    et al.
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Ekstrand, Bo
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Frozen storage and thawing methods affect biochemical and sensory attributes of rainbow trout1995In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 627-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rainbow trout were subjected to four thawing treatments after being stored at -18°C and -40°C for 0, 3, 7, 13 and 18 mo. Membrane integrity was estimated as the volume of centrifuged tissue fluid (CTF) and by lysosomal (3-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) activity in CTF. Slow thawing, in air at 5°C, resulted in higher NAG activity in CTF and a larger volume of CTF than fast thawing, at 25°C in water, independent of storage time. After 3 or more months storage, a higher NAG activity in CTF and a larger volume of CTF were found in all - 18°C stored samples compared to that at -40°C. Sensory evaluation confirmed differences between trout stored at - 18°C and at - 40°C for 18 mo.

  • 8.
    Ohlsson, Thomas
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Food waste management by life cycle assessment of the food chain2004In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 69, no 3, p. CRH107-CRH109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past, environmental activities in the food industry used to be focused on meeting the requirements set by authorities on waste and sewage disposal and, more recently, regarding emissions to air. Today environmental issues are considered an essential part of the corporate image in progressive food industries. To avoid sub-optimization, food waste management should involve assessing the environmental impact of the whole food chain. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an ISO-standardized method to assess the environmental impact of a food product. It evaluates the resources used to perform the different activities through the chain of production from raw material to the user step. It also summarizes the emission/waste to air, water, and land from the same activities throughout the chain. These emissions are then related to the major environmental concerns such as eutrophication, acidification, and ecotoxicity, the factors most relevant for the food sector. The food industry uses the LCAs to identify the steps in the food chain that have the largest impact on the environment in order to target the improvement efforts. It is then used to choose among alternatives in the selection of raw materials, packaging material, and other inputs as well as waste management strategies. A large number of food production chains have been assessed by LCAs over the years. This will be exemplified by a comparison of the environmental impact of ecologically grown raw materials to those conventionally grown. Today LCA is often integrated into process and product development, for example, in a project for reduction of water usage and waste valorization in a diversified dairy.

  • 9.
    Ohlsson, Thomas
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Food waste management by life cycle assessment of the food chain2004In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 69, no 3, p. CRH107-CRH109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past, environmental activities in the food industry used to be focused on meeting the requirements set by authorities on waste and sewage disposal and, more recently, regarding emissions to air. Today environmental issues are considered an essential part of the corporate image in progressive food industries. To avoid sub-optimization, food waste management should involve assessing the environmental impact of the whole food chain. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an ISO-standardized method to assess the environmental impact of a food product. It evaluates the resources used to perform the different activities through the chain of production from raw material to the user step. It also summarizes the emission/waste to air, water, and land from the same activities throughout the chain. These emissions are then related to the major environmental concerns such as eutrophication, acidification, and ecotoxicity, the factors most relevant for the food sector. The food industry uses the LCAs to identify the steps in the food chain that have the largest impact on the environment in order to target the improvement efforts. It is then used to choose among alternatives in the selection of raw materials, packaging material, and other inputs as well as waste management strategies. A large number of food production chains have been assessed by LCAs over the years. This will be exemplified by a comparison of the environmental impact of ecologically grown raw materials to those conventionally grown. Today LCA is often integrated into process and product development, for example, in a project for reduction of water usage and waste valorization in a diversified dairy.

  • 10.
    Ohlsson, Thomas
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Overcoming barriers to globalization: A European prospective2004In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 69, no 5, p. R151-R152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ohlsson, Thomas
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Overcoming barriers to globalization: A European prospective2004In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 69, no 5, p. R151-R152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Olsson, E.E.M.
    et al.
    Tragardh, A.C.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Effect of near-infrared radiation and jet impingement heat transfer on crust formation of bread2005In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 70, no 8, p. E484-E491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid heat transfer methods can be used to speed up the baking process and create new product properties. This study investigates the effect of air jet impingement and infrared radiation (alone or in combination) on crust formation of par-baked baguettes during post-baking. The parameters investigated are crust color, crust thickness, total water loss, and heating time. The results show that infrared radiation and jet impingement, as compared with heating in a conventional household oven, increased the rate of color development of the crust and shortened the heating time. The fastest color development was obtained by combining infrared and impingement heating. The water loss rate was increased due to the high heat transfer rate, but the total water loss was reduced because of the shorter heating time. Crust thickness was most dependent on heating time and crust temperature. In general, the crust was thinner for infrared-heated baguettes. © 2005 Institute of Food Technologists.

  • 13. Ryynanen, S.
    et al.
    Ohlsson, Thomas
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Microwave heating uniformity of ready meals as affected by placement, composition, and geometry1996In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 620-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of chemical and physical modifications in a ready meal on microwave heating uniformity was investigated. Experimental materials were four-component chilled ready meals which were heated in a domestic microwave oven. The experiment was set up by using 25 factor design and data were evaluated by analysis of variance. Temperatures during and after microwave heating were measured. Heating uniformity could be mainly modified by arrangement and geometry of components and type of tray. In contrast, chemical modifications had no effect or some combined effects with other factors.

  • 14. Ryynanen, S.
    et al.
    Risman, P.O.
    Ohlsson, Tomas
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Hamburger composition and microwave heating uniformity2004In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 69, no 7, p. M187-M196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of recipe modifications on the microwave heating uniformity and dielectric properties of a hamburger was investigated in a household oven. Factorial design was used in the experimental setup, and data were evaluated by analysis of variance. Temperature was monitored by a fiberoptic device, infrared imaging, and thermocouples. Dielectric data of the hamburger components were measured by a cavity perturbation method. An analytical model for calculating microwave energy balance was developed and compared with experimental data, and numerical modeling was also used in the analysis, and the results were compared. Uneven heating is difficult to improve by recipe modifications only. The differences between the analytical and numerical modeling indicate that the uniformity of heating in relatively small loads is difficult to achieve.

  • 15.
    Svanberg, Lina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Chocolate Swelling during Storage Caused by Fat or Moisture Migration2012In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 77, no 11, p. E328-E334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantification of swelling in dark chocolate subjected to fat or moisture migration was conducted using a new method based on confocal chromatic displacement sensor. The nondestructive method allowed for the height profile of dark chocolate samples to be scanned with a sensitivity of ± 2.8 ?m. By performing multiple scans on each sample prior to and after being subjected to fat or moisture migration, the induced swelling could be quantified. Applying the new method on confectionery systems revealed that fat and moisture migration generate different swelling behavior/kinetics in dark chocolate during storage. Moisture migration resulted in a rapid swelling once a water activity of 0.8 was reached in the chocolate, probably by interaction and absorption of moisture by the particulate solids. Fat migration also affected the swelling behavior in chocolate, possibly by inducing phase transitions in the continuous cocoa butter phase. Migrating fat also proved to induce a more pronounced swelling than the same amount of absorbed moisture which further consolidated that the observed swelling caused by fat or moisture migration is a result of significant different mechanisms. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  • 16.
    Tibäck, Evelina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Svelander, C.A.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Altskär, Annika
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Alminger, M.A.G.
    Langton, Maud
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Mechanical and thermal pretreatments of crushed tomatoes: Effects on consistency and in vitro accessibility of lycopene2009In: Journal of Food Science, ISSN 0022-1147, E-ISSN 1750-3841, Vol. 74, no 7, p. E386-E395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of mechanical and thermal treatments on the consistency and in vitro lycopene accessibility of crushed tomatoes were evaluated. Different crushing intensities and a subsequent heat treatment carried out as a heat shock (95 °C for 8 min) or a boiling step (100 °C for 20 min) were examined. Additional homogenization was compared with milder crushing regarding the effect on lycopene content and in vitro accessibility. Textural properties, polygalacturonase and pectinmethylesterase activity, pectin degree of methoxylation, lycopene content, and in vitro lycopene accessibility were evaluated. Microstructure was studied using both light and transmission electron microscopy. Crushing and subsequent heating affected the pectin degree of methoxylation and the consistency of the crushed tomatoes. The mechanical and thermal treatments did not affect the lycopene content to any great extent; however, in vitro accessibility seemed to improve with extensive crushing followed by heating. Crushing or homogenization in itself was not enough to increase in vitro lycopene accessibility. © 2009 Institute of Food Technologists®.

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