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  • 1. Bernin, D.
    et al.
    Steglich, Thomas
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Roding, M.
    Moldin, A.
    Topgaard, D.
    Langton, M.
    Multi-scale characterization of pasta during cooking using microscopy and real-time magnetic resonance imaging2014In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 66, p. 132-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macroscopic properties of pasta, such as the texture, are formed during cooking by a complex interplay of water and heat with the structuring agents starch and gluten. The impact of the starch-to-gluten ratio on microstructure and water distribution in pasta was analyzed by a multi-scale approach combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and light microscopy. The cooking process and thus the water distribution was monitored non-invasively using 1H MRI in real-time with a temporal resolution of 45s. Our MRI set-up allowed following the water ingress by imaging the reduction of the uncooked core. The water ingress rate was neither dependent on pasta composition nor on the presence of salt in the cooking media (0.7% NaCl). Starch-rich samples showed a more homogeneous water distribution in the gelatinized zone, which was mirrored in a more homogeneous microstructure. In contrast, gluten-rich samples showed both a heterogeneous water distribution and microstructure. Thus, the gluten content affected local water content in the gelatinized zone but not the water ingress.

  • 2.
    Both, E M
    et al.
    Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.
    Nuzzo, Marine
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Millqvist-Fureby, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Surface, Process and Formulation.
    Boom, R M
    Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.
    Schutyser, M A I
    Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands.
    Morphology development during single droplet drying of mixed component formulations and milk2018In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 109, p. 448-454, article id S0963-9969(18)30328-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the influence of selected components and their mixtures on the development of the morphology during drying of single droplets and extend the results to the morphology of whole milk powder particles. Sessile single droplet drying and acoustic levitation methods were employed to study single droplet drying. The influence of carbohydrates (lactose and maltodextrin DE12) and proteins (micellar casein or whey protein) on morphology development is very different, since upon concentration protein systems will jam and undergo a colloidal glass transition, whereas carbohydrate systems will gradually increase in viscosity as a consequence of the concentration. Whey protein gives relatively rigid shells due to jamming of the "hard sphere" proteins, while casein micelles behave as "soft spheres" that can deform after jamming, which gives flexibility to the shell during drying. The influence of the carbohydrates on the final morphology was found much larger than the influence of the proteins. Caseins influenced morphology only in mixtures with lactose at higher concentrations due to its high voluminosity. Similar observations were done for whole milk, where fat appeared to have no influence. With maltodextrin the influence of the casein was again observed in the shape and smoothness of wrinkles. Both sessile and levitated droplet drying methods provide a similar and consistent view on morphology development.

  • 3.
    Dalvi-Isfahan, Mohsen
    et al.
    Isfahan University of Technology, Iran.
    Hamdami, Nasser
    Isfahan University of Technology, Iran.
    Le-Bail, Alain
    CNRS, France; University of Nantes, France.
    Xanthakis, Epameinondas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience.
    The principles of high voltage electric field and its application in food processing: A review2016In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 89, p. 48-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food processing is a major part of the modern global industry and it will certainly be an important sector of the industry in the future. Several processes for different purposes are involved in food processing aiming at the development of new products by combining and/or transforming raw materials, to the extension of food shelf-life, recovery, exploitation and further use of valuable compounds and many others. During the last century several new food processes have arisen and most of the traditional ones have evolved. The future food factory will require innovative approaches food processing which can combine increased sustainability, efficiency and quality. Herein, the objective of this review is to explore the multiple applications of high voltage electric field (HVEF) and its potentials within the food industry. These applications include processes such as drying, refrigeration, freezing, thawing, extending food shelf- life, and extraction of biocompounds. In addition, the principles, mechanism of action and influence of specific parameters have been discussed comprehensively.

  • 4.
    Davis, Jenny
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Baumgartner, D.U.
    Nemecek, T.
    Environmental impact of four meals with different protein sources: Case studies in Spain and Sweden2010In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1874-1884Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hickey, C. D.
    et al.
    Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ireland; University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Diehl, B. W. K.
    Spectral service AG, Germany.
    Nuzzo, Marine
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Millqvist-Feurby, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Wilkinson, M. G.
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Sheehan, J. J.
    Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ireland.
    Influence of buttermilk powder or buttermilk addition on phospholipid content, chemical and bio-chemical composition and bacterial viability in Cheddar style-cheese2017In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 102, p. 748-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of buttermilk powder addition post-curd formation or buttermilk addition to cheese milk on total and individual phospholipid content, chemical composition, enzyme activity, microbial populations and microstructure within Cheddar-style cheese was investigated. Buttermilk or buttermilk powder addition resulted in significant increases in total phospholipid content and their distribution throughout the cheese matrix. Addition of 10% buttermilk powder resulted in higher phospholipid content, moisture, pH and salt in moisture levels, and lower fat, fat in dry matter, L. helveticus and non-starter bacteria levels in cheeses. Buttermilk powder inclusion resulted in lower pH 4.6/Soluble Nitrogen (SN) levels and significantly lower free amino acid levels in 10% buttermilk powder cheeses. Buttermilk addition provided a more porous cheese microstructure with greater fat globule coalescence and increased free fat pools, while also increasing moisture and decreasing protein, fat and pH levels. Addition of buttermilk in liquid or powdered form offers potential for new cheeses with associated health benefits. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 6.
    Jha, Piyush Kumar
    et al.
    ONIRIS CS 82225, France; UMR GEPEA CNRS 6144 - ONIRIS, France.
    Chevallier, Sylvie
    ONIRIS CS 82225, France; UMR GEPEA CNRS 6144 - ONIRIS, France.
    Jury, Vanessa
    ONIRIS CS 82225, France; UMR GEPEA CNRS 6144 - ONIRIS, France.
    Xanthakis, Epameinondas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Le-Bail, Alain
    ONIRIS CS 82225, France; UMR GEPEA CNRS 6144 - ONIRIS, France.
    Assessment of freeze damage in fruits and vegetables2019In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 121, p. 479-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Freezing is an efficient and widely used method of food preservation. However, it can also cause irreversible damages at cellular level which in turn degrade the overall quality of the frozen food products. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative methods and technologies that will be able to evaluate with accuracy the freeze damage are of great importance. This review paper provides a comprehensive study of the methods that have been used to evaluate the freeze damage in fruits and vegetables. Further than the principles and the applications of those methods, the advantages and the limitations are also being discussed.[

  • 7.
    Jha, Piyush Kumar
    et al.
    ONIRIS, France; UMR GEPEA, France.
    Xanthakis, Epameinondas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Chevallier, Sylvie
    ONIRIS, France; UMR GEPEA, France.
    Jury, Vanessa
    ONIRIS, France; UMR GEPEA, France.
    Le-Bail, Alain
    ONIRIS, France; UMR GEPEA, France.
    Assessment of freeze damage in fruits and vegetables2019In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 121, p. 479-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Freezing is an efficient and widely used method of food preservation. However, it can also cause irreversible damages at cellular level which in turn degrade the overall quality of the frozen food products. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative methods and technologies that will be able to evaluate with accuracy the freeze damage are of great importance. This review paper provides a comprehensive study of the methods that have been used to evaluate the freeze damage in fruits and vegetables. Further than the principles and the applications of those methods, the advantages and the limitations are also being discussed. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 8.
    Steglich, Thomas
    et al.
    SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Bernin, D.
    Roding, M.
    Nyden, M.
    Moldin, A.
    Topgaard, D.
    Microstructure and water distribution of commercial pasta studied by microscopy and 3D magnetic resonance imaging2014In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 62, p. 644-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing pasta is a rather well known process, but it is still challenging to tailor pasta products with new raw materials. In this study, we evaluated the effects of raw materials on the microstructure and water distribution in cooked pasta using 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as bright field and polarized light microscopy. The MRI parameters initial intensity (I0) and transverse dephasing time (T2 *) serve as indicators of the local water concentration and water-macromolecule interactions through chemical exchange, respectively. These parameters were mapped throughout the whole pasta volume with a spatial resolution of 78?m in all three dimensions. MRI was combined with light microscopy to link I0 and T2 * to microstructure components such as fiber particles and the extent of starch gelatinization. Four commercial spaghetti samples were analyzed which were made of durum wheat flour, both plain and enriched with wheat fiber, as well as with wholegrain and soft wheat flour. Although all pasta samples showed similar macroscopic water absorption as measured by weight increase, the sample structures differed at the microscopic scale. Compared to durum wheat spaghetti, the presence of fiber particles decreased T2 *, while spaghetti enriched with soft wheat flour increased T2 *. In addition, light microscopy showed that large fiber particles partly acted as barriers against water migration and protected starch granules from swelling. Smaller wheat fiber particles did not affect local starch swelling. Thus, the combination of light microscopy and MRI is a powerful tool to study the microstructure and water distribution in pasta. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 9.
    Svanberg, Lina
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Windhab, E.
    Effect of pre-crystallization process and solid particle addition on microstructure in chocolate model systems2011In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 1339-1350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The microstructure of chocolate model systems was investigated at the meso (~. 10. ?m), micro (~. 50. ?m), and macro (0.1-1 mm) scales simultaneously, to examine effect of pre-crystallization process and/or solid particle addition on the formation of a dense structure. The structure density was quantified by measuring the diffusion rate of small molecules at different length scales. At the meso scale, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was utilized to quantify local diffusion rate solely in the fat phase, whereas high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements were made to assess the global diffusion of the same molecules at the macro scale. Both techniques were used in combination with microstructure characterization using confocal laser scanning microscopy (micro scale) and supported by differential scanning calorimeter melting curves for estimating cocoa butter polymorphism. Both FRAP and HPLC analysis generated relevant information on the effect of pre-crystallization and solid particle addition on the structure density. FRAP measurements gave detailed information on microstructure heterogeneity or homogeneity in the cocoa butter, whereas HPLC clearly revealed the impact of solid particles on the structure density. Combining the two techniques revealed that a compact and homogeneous structure obtained through optimized pre-crystallization is required at all times, i.e., immediately after cooling and throughout the product's shelf life, to retard global diffusion in confectionery systems. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 10. Ture, H.
    et al.
    Gällstedt, M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Hedenqvist, M.S.
    Antimicrobial compression-moulded wheat gluten films containing potassium sorbate2012In: Food Research International, ISSN 0963-9969, E-ISSN 1873-7145, no 1, p. 109-115Article in journal (Refereed)
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