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  • 1.
    Ali, Liaqat
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Alsanius, Beatrix W.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Rosberg, Anna Karin
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Svensson, Birgitta
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Tim
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Olsson, Marie E.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Effects of nutrition strategy on the levels of nutrients and bioactive compounds in blackberries2012In: European Food Research and Technology, ISSN 1438-2377, E-ISSN 1438-2385, Vol. 234, no 1, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of nutrition strategy on levels of nutrients and bioactive compounds in fruit and leaves of blackberries were studied in greenhouse-grown blackberry plants fertilised with combinations of two levels (low, high) of nitrogen (60 and 100 kg ha -1, respectively) and potassium (66.4 and 104 kg ha -1, respectively). Plant concentrations of organic phytochemicals were quantitatively analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. High amounts of both fertilisers produced high amounts of all nutrients and bioactive compounds analysed in fruit except total acidity and ellagic acid. There were major differences in compounds affecting taste in fruit, e. g., sugars (fructose and glucose), total soluble solids and pH, and also in anthocyanin content. The concentrations of secondary metabolites, vitamin C and ellagic acid in fruit also varied significantly between treatments, although the differences were smaller. Storage of blackberries showed variable effects in the different levels of compounds, and the changes found were small. Nutrient regime did not affect blackberry leaves to the same extent, and only minor changes were found. The findings show that by optimising plant nutrition, phytonutrient levels can be maximised and maintained in fresh and stored berry crops, especially those grown in greenhouses, where conditions can easily be regulated. 

  • 2.
    Bergentall, Martina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Malafronte, Loredana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    As, Dorine
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Hedelab, Belgium.
    Calmet, Emeline
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Fleury Michon, France.
    Melin, Petter
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Reduction of malic acid in bilberry juice by Lactiplantibacillus plantarum-mediated malolactic fermentation2023In: European Food Research and Technology, ISSN 1438-2377, E-ISSN 1438-2385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus) are the most common wild berries in Northern Europe. A substantial amount of the berries are picked with the objective to extract highly valued products such as anthocyanins. A smaller amount of the bilberries is used to make jams and drinks, and these are generally restricted to the domestic market. One reason is the sour taste, partly as a result of the high content of malic acid. By using certain strains of lactic acid bacteria with the ability to convert malic acid to lactic acid, the taste is predicted to be more pleasant. This process is called malolactic fermentation, and historically it has mostly been used in winemaking. After testing five different starter cultures, we identified that the strain, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum LP58, can rapidly convert malic acid to lactic acid without any loss of sugar or citric acid, which strongly indicates a successful malolactic acid fermentation. As it has been reported that other strains of L. plantarum can be used as biopreservative agents, the resulting product was also tested in terms of microbial safety after prolonged storage, and by means of metagenome sequencing. The obtained product was quite tolerant to microbial growth, but this observation was rather due to an initial heat treatment than the addition of lactobacilli. Potentially, starter cultures with documented biopreservative activity can be combined with L. plantarum LP58 to obtain a more stable product. Until then, the fermented bilberry juice must be processed and preserved like non-fermented bilberry products. © 2023, The Author(s).

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  • 3. Bredholt, S.
    et al.
    Maukonen, J.
    Kujanpaa, K.
    Alanko, T.
    Olofson, U.
    Husmark, U.
    Microbial methods for assessment of cleaning and disinfection of food-processing surfaces cleaned in a low-pressure system1999In: European Food Research and Technology, ISSN 1438-2377, E-ISSN 1438-2385, Vol. 209, no 2, p. 145-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An assessment system using various microbial methods was developed for the detection of residual, surface-attached microbes and soil on surfaces after sanitation. The microbial methods tested were: conventional cultivation, microscopy using image analysis after staining with acridine orange (AO), 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride/4?, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (CTC-DAPI) and LIVE/DEAD stains, impedance measurements, viable counts with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) agar and ATP measurements. A test rig was used for the trials with four different low-pressure cleaning procedures (pressure ? 20 bar flow rate 271 min-1). A strong alkaline foam cleaner, Trippel, and a mild alkaline foam cleaner, Topax 12, in combination with two disinfectants, respectively, were used. The disinfectants were peroxide-peracetic-acid-based Oxonia Aktiv and potassium-persulphate-based Virkon. Conventional cultivation combined with impedance measurements and image analysis of surfaces stained with AO, as well as CTC-DAPI, gave results that were comparable and complementary. The combination of these methods enabled a total evaluation of both the removal of biofilm and the killing of bacterial cells. The low-pressure cleaning system did not remove all of the bacterial cells from the surfaces and did not kill the bacteria even after use of the strong alkaline foam cleaner. The above-mentioned protocol carried out on the test rig can also be used to evaluate the ensitivity of microbial methods for use in certain industrial premises. © Springer-Verlag 1999.

  • 4.
    Gmoser, Rebecca
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Bordes, Romain
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Gustav
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Altskär, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Berta, Marco
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Effect of dispersed particles on instant coffee foam stability and rheological properties2017In: European Food Research and Technology, ISSN 1438-2377, E-ISSN 1438-2385, Vol. 243, no 1, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Properties of instant coffee foam constitute the focus of this study. The coffee, obtained from commercial sources, was dispersed in water at a concentration in the range of standard use. The resulting solution contained a substantial amount of micron and submicron size particles that were filtered with membranes having difference size cut-offs in order to investigate the relationship foam properties—particles size. The foams produced from these solutions have been imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and their moduli and stability have been measured by oscillatory rheology, using an in-house developed rheometric set-up. The results show that particles larger than 0.8 µm have little effect on the reduction of drainage while a clear strengthening effect on the foam was evident. This was a result of their diffusion to the lamellae borders, which increases the viscosity of the liquid–air interface. Particles smaller than 0.2 µm affect bubble coarsening and likely hinder the migration of soluble surface active species to the bubble surface. Particles also participate in the stabilization of the air–water interface, and this affects both the foam stability and mechanical properties. Established models developed for ideal foam systems containing particles are difficult to apply due to the complexity of the system studied. Despite this limitation, these results provide increased understanding of the effect of particles on instant coffee foams.

  • 5.
    Jacobsson, Annelie
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Nielsen, Tim
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Sjöholm, Ingegerd
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Effects of type of packaging material on shelf-life of fresh broccoli by means of changes in weight, colour and texture2004In: European Food Research and Technology, ISSN 1438-2377, E-ISSN 1438-2385, Vol. 218, no 2, p. 157-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five polymeric films were studied to determine their ability to retain the colour, weight and texture of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica "Monterey"). The materials were oriented polypropylene (OPP), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and two different low-density polyethylenes (LDPE), one of which contained a sachet reported to absorb ethylene. The broccoli was packaged and stored at 4 and 10 °C for 4 weeks. The weight, colour, chlorophyll content and texture were monitored during storage as well as O 2 and CO2 concentrations inside the packages. Packaging prolonged the broccoli shelf-life by up to 14 days. The shelf-life varied depending on the packaging material and quality parameter considered. The atmosphere was modified inside the packages; however, no package provided the recommended atmosphere (O2 1-2% and CO2 5-10%) for broccoli. Packaging in OPP resulted in the highest CO2 concentration, 6%, while the lowest O2 concentration, 9%, was created in the LDPE package without a sachet for ethylene absorption. Storage in LDPE without ethylene absorber resulted in the overall longest shelf-life. Broccoli stored in PVC deteriorated faster than broccoli packaged in the other materials. The influence of packaging material was greater at the higher temperature.

  • 6. Kent, M.
    et al.
    Knochel, R.
    Daschner, F.
    Berger, U.-K.
    Composition of foods using microwave dielectric spectra2000In: European Food Research and Technology, ISSN 1438-2377, E-ISSN 1438-2385, Vol. 210, no 5, p. 359-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a European Union project (FAIR CT97 3020) microwave dielectric spectra of processed prawns (Pandalus borealis), cod (Gadus morhua), pork and chicken were measured and the data transformed using the statistical method of principal component analysis. The principal components were regressed (principal component regression) against various compositional variables, notably added water, protein, water, total phosphorus and NaCl and the calibration was validated using the method of internal cross-validation. © Springer-Verlag 2000.

  • 7. Kent, M.
    et al.
    MacKenzie, K.
    Berger, U.-K.
    Knochel, R.
    Daschner, F.
    Determination of prior treatment of fish and fish products using microwave dielectric spectra2000In: European Food Research and Technology, ISSN 1438-2377, E-ISSN 1438-2385, Vol. 210, no 6, p. 427-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microwave dielectric spectra of fish products [processed prawns (Pandalus borealis), cod (Gadus morhua), haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and saithe (Pollachus virens)] were transformed using the statistical method of principal component analysis. The principal components obtained were used as descriptors to construct discriminant functions for the separation of the samples into groups, e.g. added water or no added water, polyphosphate or no polyphosphate. The method was validated using internal cross-validation. © Springer-Verlag 2000.

  • 8.
    Mayor, Luis
    et al.
    Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain.
    Flynn, Katherine
    European Association for Food Safety, Belgium.
    Dermesonluoglu, Efimia
    National Technical University of Athens, Greece.
    Pittia, Paola
    University of Teramo, Italy.
    Baderstedt, Erik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Ruiz-Bejarano, Barbara
    AINIA Centro Tecnologico, Spain.
    Geicu, Mihaela
    University of Agronomic Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Bucharest, Romania.
    Quintas, Mafalda A. C.
    Catholic University of Portugal, Portugal.
    Lakner, Zoltan
    Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary.
    Costa, Rui
    Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Skill development in food professionals: a European study2015In: European Food Research and Technology, ISSN 1438-2377, E-ISSN 1438-2385, Vol. 240, no 5, p. 871-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The food sector is the largest employer in the European Union, yet it ranks low in innovation and few educated young people pursue food careers. Updating both the skills and the image of food science and technology professionals (FSTs) first requires understanding the current situation. This work compares the view of currently employed FSTs (3,007) with that of food science and technology (FST) employers (602) regarding skills and when and where they should be developed. European FSTs responded to a web-based survey in 2011 and 2012, and FST employers responded to an e-mail-based survey and/or attended brainstorming workshops from 2009 to 2012. Soft skills, especially those related with communication, were the best evaluated by both groups, whereas technical non-food skills were in the lowest positions. FSTs were judged qualified by their employers in some food skills (food safety and quality, product development, production), while others (engineering maintenance, consumer and nutritional sciences, environmental issues) were more poorly evaluated. In general, FSTs believe themselves to be well qualified by higher education programs, and most of them do not continue training once they are working, with the notable exception of those that achieve positions of high responsibility. However, employers appeared to disagree, recommending that education and training in soft, food and technical skills continue throughout working life. Additionally, they recommended more frequent reinforcement of soft than of food or technical skills. A competitive food sector requires FSTs of the highest quality, and understanding the view of FSTs and their employees can contribute to improved training and thus benefit the European food sector.

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