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  • 1.
    Arnell, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019). Lund University, Sweden.
    Astals, Sergi
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Åmand, Linda
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Batstone, Damien J.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Jensen, Paul D.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Jeppsson, Ulf
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Modelling anaerobic co-digestion in Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2:parameter estimation, substrate characterisation and plant-wide integration2016In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 98, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaerobic co-digestion is an emerging practice at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to improve the energy balance and integrate waste management. Modelling of co-digestion in a plant-wide WWTP model is a powerful tool to assess the impact of co-substrate selection and dose strategy on digester performance and plant-wide effects. A feasible procedure to characterise and fractionate co-substrates COD for the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2) was developed. This procedure is also applicable for the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). Long chain fatty acid inhibition was included in the ADM1 model to allow for realistic modelling of lipid rich co-substrates. Sensitivity analysis revealed that, apart from the biodegradable fraction of COD, protein and lipid fractions are the most important fractions for methane production and digester stability, with at least two major failure modes identi fied through principal component analysis (PCA). The model and procedure were tested on bio-methane potential (BMP) tests on three substrates, each rich on carbohydrates, proteins or lipids with good predictive capability in all three cases. This model was then applied to a plant-wide simulation study which confirmed the positive effects of co-digestion on methane production and total operational cost. Simulations also revealed the importance of limiting the protein load to the anaerobic digester to avoid ammonia inhibition in the digester and overloading of the nitrogen removal processes in the water train. In contrast, the digester can treat relatively high loads of lipid rich substrates without prolonged disturbances.

  • 2. Ericsson, B
    et al.
    Eriksson, L
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Activated sludge characteristics in a phosphorus depleted environment1988In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 22, p. 151-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Eriksson, L
    et al.
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Axberg, C
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Direct influence of wastewater pollutants on flocculation and sedimentationbehaviour in biological wastewater treatment : I. model system E.coli B1981In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 15, p. 421-431Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eveborn, David
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Gustafsson, J.P.
    Elmefors, Elin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Yu, L.
    Eriksson, A.-K.
    Ljung, Emelie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
    Renman, G.
    Phosphorus in soil treatment systems: Accumulation and mobility2014In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 64, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Septic tanks with subsequent soil treatment systems (STS) are a common treatment technique for domestic wastewater in rural areas. Phosphorus (P) leakage from such systems may pose a risk to water quality (especially if they are located relatively close to surface waters). In this study, six STS in Sweden (11-28 years old) were examined. Samples taken from the unsaturated subsoil beneath the distribution pipes were investigated by means of batch and column experiments, and accumulated phosphorus were characterized through X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis. At all sites the wastewater had clearly influenced the soil. This was observed through decreased pH, increased amounts of oxalate extractable metals and at some sites altered P sorption properties. The amount of accumulated P in the STS were found to be between 0.32 and 0.87kgm-3, which in most cases was just a fraction of the estimated P load (<30%). Column studies revealed that high P concentrations (up to 6mgL-1) were leached from the material when deionized water was applied. However, the response to deionized water varied between the sites. As evidenced by XANES analysis, aluminium phosphates or P adsorbed to aluminium (hydr)oxides, as well as organically bound P, were important sinks for P. Generally soils with a high content of oxalate-extractable Al were also less vulnerable to P leakage. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 5.
    Kazadi Mbamba, Christian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy. Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindblom, E.
    Lund University, Sweden; Stockholm Vatten Och Avfall, Sweden.
    Flores-Alsina, X.
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Tait, S.
    University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Anderson, S.
    Stockholm Vatten Och Avfall, Sweden.
    Saagi, R.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Batstone, D. J.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Gernaey, K. V.
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Jeppsson, U.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Plant-wide model-based analysis of iron dosage strategies for chemical phosphorus removal in wastewater treatment systems2019In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 155, p. 12-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stringent phosphorus discharge standards (i.e. 0.15–0.3 g P.m −3 ) in the Baltic area will compel wastewater treatment practice to augment enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) with chemical precipitation using metal salts. This study examines control of iron chemical dosing for phosphorus removal under dynamic loading conditions to optimize operational aspects of a membrane biological reactor (MBR) pilot plant. An upgraded version of the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2) with an improved physico-chemical framework (PCF) is used to develop a plant-wide model for the pilot plant. The PCF consists of an equilibrium approach describing ion speciation and pairing, kinetic minerals precipitation (such as hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) and FePO 4 ) as well as adsorption and co-precipitation. Model performance is assessed against data sets from the pilot plant, evaluating the capability to describe water and sludge lines across the treatment process under steady-state operation. Simulated phosphorus differed as little as 5–10% (relative) from measured phosphorus, indicating that the model was representative of reality. The study also shows that environmental factors such as pH, as well operating conditions such as Fe/P molar ratios (1, 1.5 and 2), influence the concentration of dissolved phosphate in the effluent. The time constant of simultaneous precipitation in the calibrated model, due to a step change decrease/increase in FeSO 4 dosage, was found to be roughly 5 days, indicating a slow dynamic response due to a multi-step process involving dissolution, oxidation, precipitation, aging, adsorption and co-precipitation. The persistence effect of accumulated iron-precipitates (HFO particulates) in the activated sludge seemed important for phosphorus removal, and therefore solids retention time plays a crucial role according to the model. The aerobic tank was deemed to be the most suitable dosing location for FeSO 4 addition, due to high dissolved oxygen levels and good mixing conditions. Finally, dynamic model-based analyses show the benefits of using automatic control when dosing chemicals. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

  • 6. Le Bell, J
    et al.
    Stenius, P
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    Axberg, C
    Coagulation and sedimentation in chemical precipitation of wastewaters1983In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 17, p. 1073-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Roberts, K
    et al.
    Wennerberg, A-M
    Friberg, S
    YKI – Ytkemiska institutet.
    The influence of added saccharide, protein and lipid on the sedimentation of E.coli bacteria using aluminium sulphate and polyacrylamides1974In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 8, p. 61-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Säve-Söderbergh, Melle
    et al.
    National Food Agency, Sweden ; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Bylund, John
    National Food Agency, Sweden.
    Malm, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Simonsson, Magnus
    National Food Agency, Sweden.
    Toljander, Johan
    National Food Agency, Sweden.
    Gastrointestinal illness linked to incidents in drinking water distribution networks in Sweden2017In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 122, p. 503-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, knowledge gaps on drinking water-related gastrointestinal illness have been identified, especially for non-epidemic cases. Pathogen contamination of drinking water during distribution has been suggested to contribute to these cases, but the risk factors are not yet fully understood. During 2014–2015, we conducted an epidemiological study in five municipalities in Sweden, to assess whether incidents in the drinking water distribution system influence the risk of gastrointestinal illness. Telephone interviews were conducted in the affected areas and in reference areas 7–14 days after a reported incident. Symptoms of gastrointestinal illness occurring during the period were documented for each household member. The results showed a significantly elevated risk of vomiting and acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in the affected areas, compared to the reference areas (ORvom. = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.2–3.3; ORAGI = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–3.0). Certain conditions, or risk factors, during the incidents, such as sewage and drinking water pipelines at the same level in the trench, were associated with an elevated risk of AGI and vomiting. Safety measures taken during repair work, like flushing, were also associated with an elevated risk of AGI and vomiting. These results show that incidents in the drinking water distribution network contribute to endemic gastrointestinal illness, especially AGI and vomiting, and that external pathogen contamination of the drinking water is a likely cause of these cases of gastrointestinal illness. The results also indicate that safety measures used today may not be sufficient for eliminating the risk of gastrointestinal illness.

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