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  • 1.
    Chronakis, Ioannis
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Mekras, N.D.
    ANTER Ltd, Greece.
    Wiesauer, K.
    Upper Austrian Research GmbH, Austria.
    Breuer, E.
    Upper Austrian Research GmbH, Austria.
    Stifter, D.
    Upper Austrian Research GmbH, Austria.
    Fuentes, G.F.
    AIN, Spain.
    Qin, Y.
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    MASMICRO micro-/nano-materials processing, analysis, inspection and materials knowledge management2010In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 47, p. 963-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main goals of the 'Material Innovation and Testing' within MASMICRO are the identification of the miniature/micro-materials which are formable, development of new materials for forming and machining, development of an integrated material-testing system and study of material properties for design/analysis applications. Examples of collaborative work and results are presented regarding the processing of functional electrospun polymer micro-/nano-fibre structures and the characterization of their interface properties with tribological testing. By means of optical coherence tomography, a non-destructive inspection approach for these micro-/nano-structured webs was developed and it is also documented in the paper. Further, an application example of artificial neural networks (ANNs) is given, concerning the modelling of nano-fibres material behaviour under tensile testing. It is shown how artificial intelligence approaches (knowledge-based systems-KBS and ANNs) can support, significantly, the representation and processing of materials' knowledge of both, symbolic type, in the case of KBS, and algorithmic type, in the case of ANNs, for the cases dealt within the MASMICRO. © Springer-Verlag London Limited 2009.

  • 2.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Berglund, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Sweden.
    Evaluation of surface integrity after high energy machining with EDM, laser beam machining and abrasive water jet machining of alloy 7182019In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 100, no 5-8, p. 1575-1591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of future aero engine components based on new design strategies utilising topological optimisation and additive manufacturing has in the past years become a reality. This allows for designs that involve geometries of “free form” surfaces and material combinations that could be difficult to machine using conventional milling. Hence, alternative manufacturing routes using non-conventional high energy methods are interesting to explore. In this investigation, the three high energy machining methods abrasive water jet machining (AWJM), electrical discharge machining (EDM) and laser beam machining (LBM) have been compared in terms of surface integrity to the reference, a ball nosed end milled surface. The results showed great influence on the surface integrity from the different machining methods. It was concluded that AWJM resulted in the highest quality regarding surface integrity properties with compressive residual stresses in the surface region and a low surface roughness with texture from the abrasive erosion. Further, it was shown that EDM resulted in shallow tensile residual stresses in the surface and an isotropic surface texture with higher surface roughness. However, even though both methods could be considered as possible alternatives to conventional milling they require post processing. The reason is that the surfaces need to be cleaned from either abrasive medium from AWJM or recast layer from EDM. It was further concluded that LBM should not be considered as an alternative in this case due to the deep detrimental impact from the machining process. © 2018, The Author(s).

  • 3.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF. University West, Sweden.
    Wretland, Anders
    GKN Aerospace Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Beno, Tomas
    University West, Sweden.
    Surface integrity after post processing of EDM processed Inconel 718 shaft2018In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 95, no 5-8, p. 2325-2337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is considered as an efficient alternative to conventional material removal concepts that allows for much higher material removal rates. However, EDM generates unwanted features such as re-cast layer (RCL), tensile residual stresses and a rough surface. In order to recover the surface integrity, different post processes has been compared: high-pressure water jet (HPWJ), grit blasting (GB) and shot peening (SP). Surface integrity has been evaluated regarding microstructure, residual stresses, chemical content and surface roughness. The results showed that a combination of two post processes is required in order to restore an EDM processed surface of discontinuous islands of RCL. HPWJ was superior for removing RCL closely followed by grit blasting. However, grit blasting showed embedded grit blasting abrasive into the surface. Regarding surface roughness, it was shown that both grit blasting and HPWJ caused a roughening of the surface topography while shot peening generates a comparably smoother surface. All three post processes showed compressive residual stresses in the surface where shot peening generated the highest amplitude and penetration depths. However, the microstructure close to the surface revealed that shot peening had generated cracks parallel to the surface. The results strongly state how important it is to evaluate the surface at each of the different subsequent process steps in order to avoid initiation of cracks. © 2017 The Author(s)

  • 4.
    M'Saoubi, R.
    et al.
    Seco Tools AB.
    Chandrasekaran, Hariharan
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB.
    Hutchinson, Bevis
    RISE, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB.
    Experimental study and modelling of tool temperature distribution in orthogonal cutting of AISI 316L and AISI 3115 steels2011In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 56, p. 865-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cutting tool temperature distribution was mapped using the IR-CCD technique during machining of carbon steel AISI 3115 and stainless steel AISI 316L under orthogonal cutting conditions using flat-face geometry inserts. The effect of work material treatment on tool temperature was investigated, and the results showed that AISI 3115 in heat-treated state displayed higher tool temperature than the as-rolled state. Stainless steel 316L with high sulphur content (0.027 wt.%) and calcium treatment displayed lower cutting tool temperature than the variant with low sulphur (0.009 wt.%). The experimental results were compared with theoretical tool temperature distributions based on a modified version of Komanduri and Hou's analytical model. In particular, variable frictional heat source and secondary shear were introduced and modelling of the tool stress distribution on rake surface was also considered. © 2011 Springer-Verlag London Limited.

  • 5.
    Odenberger, Eva-Lis
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Pederson, Robert
    University West, Sweden.
    Oldenburg, Mats
    Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Finite element modeling and validation of springback and stress relaxation in the thermo-mechanical forming of thin Ti-6Al-4V sheets2019In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 104, no 9-12, p. 3439-3455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, a hot forming procedure is developed using computer-aided engineering (CAE) to produce thin Ti-6Al-4V sheet components in an effective way. Traditional forming methods involve time- and cost-consuming furnace heating and subsequent hot sizing steps. A material model for finite element (FE) analyses of sheet metal forming and springback at elevated temperatures in Ti-6Al-4V is calibrated and evaluated. The anisotropic yield criterion proposed by Barlat et al. 2003 is applied, and the time- and temperature-dependent stress relaxation behavior for elastic and inelastic straining are modeled using a Zener–Wert–Avrami formulation. Thermo-mechanical uniaxial tensile tests, a biaxial test, and uniaxial stress relaxation tests are performed and used as experimental reference to identify material model parameters at temperatures up to 700 °C. The hot forming tool setup is manufactured and used to produce double-curved aero engine components at 700 °C with different cycle times for validation purposes. Correlations between the predicted and measured responses such as springback and shape deviation show promising agreement, also when the forming and subsequent holding time was as low as 150 s. The short cycle time resulted in elimination of a detectable alpha case layer. Also, the tool surface coating extends the tool life in combination with a suitable lubricant.

  • 6.
    Vattur Sundaram, Maheswaran
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Khodaee, Alireza
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, Michael
    Höganäs AB, Sweden.
    Nyborg, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Melander, Arne
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Experimental and finite element simulation study of capsule-free hot isostatic pressing of sintered gears2018In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 99, no 5-8, p. 1725-1733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel approach to reach full density in powder metallurgy (PM) components is demonstrated in this work. Water-atomised Mo-prealloyed steel powder is utilised for manufacturing cylindrical and gear samples through double pressing and double sintering (DPDS) process route. The effect of sample geometry and powder size fraction on densification is investigated and it is found that the DPDS route enables a density level of > 95% which is sufficient to eliminate the surface open pores. Reaching such high density is necessary, in order to perform capsule-free hot isostatic pressing (HIP). After HIP, full densification is achieved for the cylindrical samples and only near full density is realised for the gears resulting in neutral zone formation due to the density gradient. In order to predict the densification behaviour during the compaction, FEM simulations considering the gear geometry are performed for both the pressing stages and HIP. The simulation predicted a similar densification behaviour with the formation of the neutral zone. The proposed DPDS route with capsule-free HIP in combination with FEM simulation is demonstrated as a potential route for manufacturing full-density PM steel components, e.g. gears, suitable for high-performance applications.

  • 7.
    Werke, Mats
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Bagge, Mats
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Process modelling using upstream analysis of manufacturing sequences2015In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 81, no 9-12, p. 1999-2006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing of components requires several manufacturing process steps that are performed in a sequence, during which the raw material is progressively converted into finished parts. The aim with simulation of manufacturing sequences is to replicate the aggregate effects of the process steps on key features of the finished product and manufacturing features. With the support of a successful simulation methodology, it will thereby be possible for process planners to evaluate virtually and select process steps to be included in the manufacturing sequence and to optimize process parameters. The motivation to implement sequential simulation in industry is therefore strong and will reduce time and cost in process planning. The modelling and simulation of complete manufacturing sequences is, however, a challenge which may lead to unrealistic and time-consuming modelling efforts and extensive computational requirements. This is due to the often complex material transformations through several consecutive process steps. In order to adapt sequential simulation into an industrial environment, simplifications are therefore necessary. This paper proposes a method for simplified metamodelling of manufacturing sequences, using upstream selection of process steps and definition of interconnected models. The method is presented as an algorithm and will improve the efficiency in the modelling of manufacturing sequences. The usability of the algorithm is demonstrated with two industrial cases: a bevel gear pinion and a steering arm.

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