Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Akesson, Karl Petter
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Designing leisure applications for the mundane car-commute2002In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 176-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commuting by car from home to work can be very time consuming. We have conducted a study to explore what people are doing, and want to do, while commuting. People use their time in the car on a wide variety of activities with great innovation. There was no unanimous activity that everyone wanted, rather a wide variety of activities were requested. Three different categories of activity were identified which we refer to as mundane, vocational and traffic related. To demonstrate a possible IT service supporting commuters, a prototype based on speech output and a simple input mechanism from a wheel was developed. This service moves sampling of music from the conventional shop into the car. The prototype was informally tested with users, which resulted in a number of improvements. Preliminary user results indicate good functionality, a comprehensive interaction interface.

  • 2.
    Björk, Staffan
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. ICE.
    Holopainen, Jussi
    Ljungstrand, Peter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. ICE.
    Åkesson, Karl-Petter
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. ICE.
    Designing Ubiquitous Computing Games - A Report from a Workshop Exploring Ubiquitous Computing Entertainment2002In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 6, p. 443-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report from a Research Atelier that explored how ubiquitous computing could be applied to fun and entertainment. The Atelier lasted for five days, starting with two days of scenario development and brainstorming activities. This led to three fairly concrete – though very different – game ideas. The background and motivation for the Atelier is described, as well as the method used and the games developed.

  • 3.
    Bylund, Markus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Service contracts: coordination of user-adaptation in open service architectures1998In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 2, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An Open Service Architecture (OSA) is a framework that supports an open set of users to subscribe to, and possibly pay for an open set of services. Today, the World Wide Web (WWW) is the most successful example of an OSA. Nevertheless, the WWW provides poor support for personalised services, since services cannot collaborate unless handcrafted to do so. We present a framework that allows independent, personalised services to coordinate their adaptations to individual users. The framework is described in terms of service contracts in an agent architecture. We first describe the general notion of service contracts, and then the particulars of service contracts used for adaptation coordination. Adaptation coordination addresses a crucial issue for OSAs: that of providing users with homogeneous interaction with heterogeneous services. We suggest that this is done by introducing a separate adaptation coordination agent, which orchestrates how the individual services are personalised.

  • 4. Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    eMoto - Emotionally Engaging Interaction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Interactive Institute.
    Slow Technology: Designing for Reflection2001In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 5, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: As computers are increasingly woven into the fabric of everyday life, interaction design may have to change - from creating only fast and efficient tools to be used during a limited time in specific situations, to creating technology that surrounds us and therefore is a part of our activities for long periods of time. We present slow technology: a design agenda for technology aimed at reflection and moments of mental rest rather than efficiency in performance. The aim of this paper is to develop a design philosophy for slow technology, to discuss general design principles and to revisit some basic issues in interaction design from a more philosophical point of view. We discuss examples of soniture and informative art as instances of slow technology and as examples on how the design principles can be applied in practice.

  • 6.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Falk, Jennica
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Wigström, Joakim
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Supporting group collaboration with interpersonal awareness devices1999In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 3, no 1-2, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An Interpersonal Awareness Device, or IPAD, is a hand-held or wearable device designed to support awareness and collaboration between people who are in the physical vicinity of each other. An IPAD is designed to supply constant awareness information to users in any location without relying on an underlying infrastructure. We have constructed one such device, the Hummingbird, which gives members of a group continuous aural and visual indications when other group members are close. We have used the Hummingbirds in several different situations to explore how they affect group awareness. These experiences indicated that the Hummingbird increased awareness between group members, and that it could complement other forms of communication such as phone and email. In particular, we found the Hummingbird to be useful when a group of people were in an unfamiliar location, for instance during a trip, where no other communication support was available. We argue that IPADs such as the Hummingbird may fulfil important functions in modern work situations.

  • 7.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Schmidt, A.
    Ullmer, B.
    Tangible interfaces in perspective: Guest editors' introduction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 291-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of physical objects as manipulable representations of information extends back to the dawn of civilization. Early research efforts toward tangible interfaces appear to have developed in parallel at several institutions. Fishkin has created a framework from the perspective of human-computer interaction, which offers researchers new tools for describing and contrasting tangible interfaces. At an editorial meeting, all papers were discussed at length by the three editors. In some cases, this meant choosing among submissions that were similar in scope, and picking the one that best supported our intentions for the issue. The paper by McNerney takes the Slot Machine as a departing point, and discusses an evolution of education-oriented tangible interface research at the MIT Media Lab. And Binder et al. discuss a series of efforts where tangible interfaces have been integrated into the working environment of students, under the auspices of a European project with partners from several countries.

  • 8.
    Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Software and Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Bylund, Markus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Boman, Magnus
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Mobile Access to Real-Time Information - The case of Autonomous Stock Brokering2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When services providing real-time information are accessible from mobile devices, functionality is often restricted and no adaptation of the user interface to the mobile device is attempted. Mobile access to real-time information requires designs for multi-device access and automated facilities for the adaptation of user interfaces. We present TapBroker, a push update service that provides mobile and stationary access to information on autonomous agents trading stocks. TapBroker is developed for the Ubiquitous Interactor system and is accessible from Java Swing user interfaces and Web user interfaces on desktop computers, and from a Java Awt user interface on mobile phones. New user interfaces can easily be added without changes in the service logic.

  • 9.
    Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Software and Systems Engineering Laboratory.
    Bylund, Markus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Waern, Annika
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ubiquitous service access through adapted user interfaces on multiple devices2005In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 9, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ubiquitous Interactor (UBI) addresses the problems of design and development that arise from services that need to be accessed from many different devices. In the UBI, a service can present itself with different user interfaces on different devices. This is done by a separation of the user-service interaction and presentation. The interaction is kept the same for all devices, and different presentation information is provided for different devices. This way, tailored user interfaces for many different devices can be created without multiplying the development and maintenance work. In this paper, we describe the design of the UBI, the system implementation, and two services implemented for the system: a calendar service and a stockbroker service.

  • 10. Paiva, Ana
    et al.
    Andersson, Gerd
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    SenToy in fantasyA: designing an affective sympathetic interface to a computer game2002In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 6, no 5-6, p. 378-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the design process of an affective control toy, named SenToy, used to control a synthetic character in a computer game. SenToy allows players to influence the emotions of a synthetic character placed in FantasyA, a 3D virtual game. By expressing gestures associated with anger, fear, surprise, sadness and joy through SenToy, players influence the emotions of the character they control in the game. When designing SenToy we hypothesized that players would manipulate the toy to express emotions using a particular set of gestures. Those gestures were drawn from literature on how we express emotions through bodily movements and from emotion theories. To evaluate our idea we performed a Wizard Of Oz study [1]. The results of the study show that there are behaviours that players easily pick up for expressing emotions through the gestures with the toy, though not necessarily the ones extracted from literature. The study also provided some indication on what type of toy we should build, in particular, its look and feel.

  • 11.
    Rost, Mattias
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Cramer, Henriette
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Mobile exploration of geotagged photographs2011In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Columbus is a mobile application that lets users explore their surroundings through geotagged photographs, presented to them at the location they were taken. By moving around the physical world, the user unlocks photographs and gets to see and experience them in unison with their location. During two consecutive field trials, we investigated how the application was used and experienced and how photographs and locations are explored together. We found that previous experience with the surroundings people was exploring affected how they experienced the localized content. We report on the system’s design and implementation, the trials as well as resulting insights that can be used by other developers of locative media applications.

  • 12.
    Weilenmann, Alexandra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, Viktoria.
    Negotiating use: Making sense of mobile technology2001In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a study of the ways in which a group negotiated the use of a new mobile technology. The group was made up of ski instructors who, during a one-week ski trip, were equipped with a mobile awareness device called the Hummingbird. The group was studied using ethnomethodologically inspired qualitative methods, with the focus on the group members' different views of the Hummingbird's intended use. Negotiations of use occurred using two methods: talk and action. The users negotiated issues such as where and when to use the technology, and whether to consider the Hummingbird a work tool or a gadget for social events. Further, the empirical results clearly show how negotiations of new, mobile technology differ from stationary technology. © Springer-Verlag London Ltd.

  • 13.
    Åkesson, Karl-Petter
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS. ICE.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Designing Leisure Applications for the Mundane Car-Commute.2002In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 6, p. 176-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commuting by car from home to work can be very time consuming. We have conducted a study to explore what people are doing, and want to do, while commuting. People use their time in the car on a wide variety of activities with great innovation. There was no unanimous activity that everyone wanted, rather a wide variety of activities were requested. Three different categories of activity were identified which we refer to as mundane, vocational and traffic related. To demonstrate a possible IT service supporting commuters, a prototype based on speech output and a simple input mechanism from a wheel was developed. This service moves sampling of music from the conventional shop into the car. The prototype was informally tested with users, which resulted in a number of improvements. Preliminary user results indicate good functionality, a comprehensive interaction interface.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7