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  • 1.
    Almeida, Cheila
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Food and Bioscience. University of Lisbon, Portugal; New University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Karadzic, Vanja
    New University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Vaz, Sofia
    New University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    The seafood market in Portugal: Driving forces and consequences2015In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 61, p. 87-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Portugal has the third highest seafood consumption per capita in the world and current patterns of seafood consumption are linked to how seafood products were embodied in the Portuguese society. The objective of this research is to understand Portuguese seafood consumption's main drivers and its consequences. For that official statistics were analyzed and a literature review on seafood consumption was undertaken. Portuguese seafood consumption is characterized by a wide diversity of species and preparing modes, when compared to other countries in Europe. Cod (salted and dried), does not exist in Portuguese waters but due to several factors, such as politics, religion and tradition, became the main species in Portuguese seafood consumption, representing around 38% of the national seafood demand. Five drivers are suggested to explain why Portuguese eat so much seafood: geography, marine resources, fisheries, social forces and politics; and consequences for the environment, economy and health are discussed. Hence while most dietary recommendations advise an increase in fish consumption is not applicable to Portugal and a more sustainable seafood consumption for the future is advocated.

  • 2. Brady, M.
    et al.
    Waldo, S.
    Fixing problems in fisheries-integrating ITQs, CBM and MPAs in management2009In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 258-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aim to show how some of the important interdisciplinary fixes or solutions to diverse problems observed in fisheries can complement each other. This can be achieved through methodical allocation of the rights pertaining to fisheries and simultaneous implementation of policy instruments to correct for market failures and equity concerns. We emphasize via a roadmap that there are some general principles that should be invoked when choosing between alternative structures of rights. Our examples from Sweden provide evidence of the flexibility of fishing rights and how they can be adapted to integrate fixes from different disciplines into practical fisheries management. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Follow the herring – A case study on the interplay between management and markets for marine resource utilization2023In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 158, article id 105874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seafood offers opportunities for more sustainable diets through having a generally high nutritional value at lower environmental pressures relative to other animal protein. Opportunities for, and challenges of, seafood production and consumption are however context dependent. Here, a case study of Swedish fisheries for Atlantic herring Clupea harengus in the Baltic Sea is added to the scientific discourse. Motivated from a heated public debate in Sweden, the purpose is to provide a first sustainability assessment of current value chains: direct consumption versus fish meal and oil production. The case study highlights the importance of taking a value chain perspective for seafood from capture fisheries – i.e., the prerequisites, constraints and opportunities for different actors – and pay attention to misaligned economic incentives that may conflict sustainable use. Although lower greenhouse gas emissions, higher nutritional value, more affordable seafood for consumers and higher economic value for fishermen may be achieved by direct consumption of herring, several challenges exist. These include above all an urgent need to safeguard sustainable and equitable fisheries exploitation; current management is increasingly eroding opportunities for value chains producing herring for food. It is also vital with realistic expectations; redirecting more herring to direct consumption also requires strategies for how potential health risks can be reduced and consumer interest could increase. Overall, the study illustrates net-effects on marine resource utilization from interplay between actors along the value chain in various ways – with implications and insights of importance for a long-term sustainable Blue Economy. 

  • 4.
    Hornborg, Sara
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Per G.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Valentinsson, Daniel
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Sweden.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Integrated environmental assessment of fisheries management: Swedish Nephrops trawl fisheries evaluated using a life cycle approach2012In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 1193-1201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fisheries management needs to broaden its perspective to achieve sustainable resource use. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an ISO standardized method to evaluate the environmental impacts of products using a broad and systematic approach. In this study, the outcome of a management regime promoting species-selective trawling in Swedish Nephrops trawl fisheries was studied using LCA methodology by quantifying the impacts per kilogram of landing using two different fishing methods. Demersal trawling has previously been found to be both energy intensive and destructive in terms of seafloor impact and discards. It is demonstrated that species-selective trawling fulfils management objectives, although with tradeoffs in terms of fuel consumption and associated GHG emissions. To prioritize between impacts, one must be aware of and quantify these potential tradeoffs. LCA could be an important tool for defining sustainable seafood production as it can visualize a broad range of impacts and facilitate integrated, transparent decision making in the seafood industry. It is also concluded that, with current LCA methodology, use of total discarded mass could increasingly be distinguished from potential impact by applying two new concepts: primary production requirements and threatened species affected. 

  • 5.
    Hornborg, Sara
    et al.
    CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Australia; University of Tasmania, Australia.
    van Putten, Ingrid
    CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Australia; University of Tasmania, Australia.
    Novaglio, Camilla
    CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Australia; University of Tasmania, Australia.
    Fulton, Elizabeth
    CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Australia; University of Tasmania, Australia.
    Blanchard, Julia
    University of Tasmania, Australia.
    Plagányi, Eva
    CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Australia; University of Tasmania, Australia.
    Bulman, Cathy
    CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Australia.
    Sainsbury, Kieth
    University of Tasmania, Australia.
    Ecosystem-based fisheries management requires broader performance indicators for the human dimension2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 108, article id 103639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) is a globally mandated approach with the intention to jointly address ecological and human (social-cultural, economic and institutional) dimensions. Indicators to measure performance against objectives have been suggested, tested, and refined but with a strong bias towards ecological indicators. In this paper, current use and application of indicators related to the human dimension in EBFM research and ecosystem models are analysed. It is found that compared to ecological counterparts, few indicators related to the human dimension are commonly associated with EBFM, and they mainly report on economic objectives related to fisheries. Similarly, in the most common ecosystem models, economic indicators are the most frequently used related to the human dimension, both in terms of model outputs and inputs. The prospect is small that indicators mainly related to profitable fishing economy are able to report on meeting the broad range of EBFM objectives and to successfully evaluate progress in achieving EBFM goals. To fully conform with EBFM principles, it is necessary to recognise that ecological and human indicators are inter-dependent. Moreover, the end-to-end ecosystem models used in EBFM will need to be further developed to allow a fuller spectrum of social-cultural, institutional, and economic objectives to be reported against.

  • 6.
    Scherrer, Kim
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Langbehn, Tom
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ljungström, Gabriella
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Enberg, Katja
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Dingsør, Gjert
    Fiskebåt, Norway.
    Jørgensen, Christian
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Spatial restrictions inadvertently doubled the carbon footprint of Norway's mackerel fishing fleet2024In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 161, article id 106014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ocean is increasingly used for industry, energy and recreation or protected for conservation, resulting in increasing spatial restrictions for fisheries. Simultaneously, producing seafood with a low climate footprint is becoming increasingly important. Despite this, the effects of spatial restrictions on the emissions of fishing fleets are poorly known. In the Northeast Atlantic, the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU (Brexit) meant that the UK regained autonomy in its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). This suddenly imposed a spatial restriction for several foreign fishing fleets targeting Northeast Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus). Here, we use this natural experiment and open fisheries data to investigate how Brexit affected the performance and emissions of the Norwegian mackerel fishery. As the fleet was excluded from fishing grounds in the UK, the catch per fishing trip almost halved, while the number of trips per vessel doubled. As a result, fuel use intensity (FUI) more than doubled from ∼0.08 to ∼0.18 L fuel per kg mackerel. We estimate that this shift required an additional 23 million liters of fuel per year, causing additional fuel costs of ∼€18 million annually and emitting an additional ∼72,000 tonnes CO2 per year. The policy change undid ∼15 years of improved fuel efficiency in Norwegian pelagic fisheries. These findings provide rare empirical evidence on how spatial restrictions can undermine progress towards decreasing greenhouse gas emissions in fisheries, highlighting the need to monitor and account for emissions in fisheries management and consider these trade-offs in marine spatial management. 

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  • 7.
    Svanberg, Martin
    et al.
    SSPA SWEDEN AB, Sweden.
    Santén, Vendela
    SSPA SWEDEN AB, Sweden.
    Hörteborn, Axel
    SSPA SWEDEN AB, Sweden.
    Holm, H.
    Svenska beräkningsbyrån AB, Sweden.
    Finnsgård, Christian
    SSPA SWEDEN AB, Sweden.
    AIS in maritime research2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 106, article id 103520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although not originally developed for research use, the Automatic Identification System (AIS) enables its data to be used in research. The present paper provides a structured overview of how AIS data is used for various research applications. Ten areas have been identified, spread across maritime, marine and other journals. Many stakeholders beyond the most frequently mentioned – authorities and maritime administrations – can benefit from the research in which AIS data is used. AIS data can be incorporated in various types of modelling approaches and play a small or large role as a source of data. AIS data can also be validated or used to validate research from other data sources. Although a large amount of AIS-based research adds to the literature, there is still a large potential for using AIS data for research by making greater use of the variety in AIS messages, combining AIS with other sources of data, and extending both spatial and temporal perspectives.

  • 8.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Eigaard, Ole
    DTU Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Parker, Robert
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Tyedmers, Peter
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Hognes, Erik
    Asplan Viak, Norway.
    Jafarzadeh, Sepideh
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Adding perspectives to: “Global trends in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fuel combustion in marine fisheries from 1950 - 2016"2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 107, article id 103488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A contribution in this issue, Greer et al. (2019), models carbon dioxide emissions from fuel combustion in global fisheries. This is done based on a method using data on fishing effort, presenting results for two sectors: small-scale and industrial fisheries. The selection of these sectors is not motivated in relation to studying fuel use, and it is well-documented that other factors more accurately predict fuel use of fisheries and would constitute a more useful basis for defining sub-sectors, when the goal of the study is to investigate fuel use. Weakly grounded assumptions made in the translation of fishing effort into carbon dioxide emissions (e.g. the engine run time per fishing day for each sector) systematically bias results towards overestimating fuel use of “industrial” vessels, underestimating that of “small-scale”. A sensitivity analysis should have been a minimum requirement for publication. To illustrate how the approach used by Greer et al. (2019) systematically misrepresents the fuel use and emissions of the two sectors, the model is applied to Australian and New Zealand rock lobster trap fisheries and compared to observed fuel use. It is demonstrated how the approach underestimates emissions of small-scale fisheries, while overestimating emissions of industrial fisheries. As global fisheries are dominated by industrial fisheries, the aggregate emission estimate is likely considerably overestimated. Effort-based approaches can be valuable to model fuel use of fisheries in data-poor situations, but should be seen as complementary to estimates based on direct data, which they can also help to validate. Whenever used, they should be based on transparent, science-based data and assumptions.

  • 9.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Hornborg, Sara
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stock size matters more than vessel size: The fuel efficiency of Swedish demersal trawl fisheries 2002-20102014In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 44, p. 72-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fisheries management determines how much of each stock can be landed when, where and how fishing is permitted. It has been identified to strongly influence the environmental performance of the fishing industry, including fuel use. As fuel data for fisheries is scarce, especially on a detailed level, the aim of this study was to develop an approach for utilizing fleet-wide fuel data to estimate the fuel use of individual fisheries and mapping how fuel efficiency in Swedish fisheries is influenced by management. Swedish demersal trawl fisheries were studied between 2002 and 2010. Results show that the overall fuel efficiency has improved and interesting patterns between different fisheries and vessel sizes emerged. The difference in fuel efficiency per kilo landing between large and small trawlers was generally small, unless catch capacity was lowered e.g. by selective grids. Stock rebuilding was shown to be highly important for fuel efficiency, as fuel use was inversely correlated to the biomass of eastern Baltic cod. However, rebuilding can also lead to trade-offs e.g. in the case of selective trawling, where protection of depleted stocks comes at the cost of higher fuel intensity per landing. Finally, tax exemption of fuel use in fisheries was shown to maintain inefficient fisheries. These results could be used to reduce overall environmental impacts of fishing further by incorporating fuel use as an additional aspect into the fisheries management system. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

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