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  • 1.
    Hummels, Caroline
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Levy, Pierre
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Alves Lino, Jorge
    Fontys University, Netherlands.
    Klooster, Sietske
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Design Research and Innovation Framework for Transformative Practices2018In: Strategies for Change / [ed] Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow: Glasgow Caledonian University , 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the concept of Transformative Practices is introduced, i.e. shared relative steady ways of living and working with others (Wittgenstein, 1993), including specific configurations of actions, norms and knowledge (Freeman et al., 2011) and related tools and environments, focused at addressing our societal challenges, by transforming (elevating) our personal and social ethics and related behaviour through designing new ways of interaction with each other and the world. Through design research and innovation within these practices, we work together towards social-cul- turally, environmentally and economically sustainable communities.

  • 2.
    Jonasson, Julia
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Andersson, Lisa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Lööf, Jenny (Editor)
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Returcykeln: Ett normkreativt avfallsprojekt2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige har ett av världens mest effektiva avfallssystem ur ett miljöperspektiv. Vi har mycket låg grad av deponi och förbränning och hög grad av källsortering. Men det har visat sig svårt att öka andelen sorterat avfall.

    Orsaken till bristande sorteringsgrad och nedskräpning sägs ofta vara att brukare inte förstår systemet eller att de medvetet slarvar i hanteringen av sitt avfall och vid sortering vid lokala återvinningsstationer.

    Men tänk om det inte stämmer. Tänk om det finns orsaker i designen av avfallssystemet som avgör brukarens benägenhet och möjlighet att göra rätt.

    I den här korta rapporten ges exempel på vad som händer när designmetoder, tjänstedesign, normkritik och stadsutveckling möts för att utmana det nuvarande avfallssystemet.

  • 3.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    A Study on a Tangible Interaction Approach to Managing Wireless Connections in a Smart Home Environment2012In: Proceedings of DeSForM 2012, Design and Semantics of Form and Movement, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological advances in computational, networking and sensing abilities are leading towards a future in which our daily lives are immersed with interactive devices that are networked and interoperable. Design has an important role in facilitating users to make sense of the many connections between devices in a networked environment. Two design solutions based on a tangible interaction approach have been developed, that allow users to manage wireless connections between devices in a smart living room context. One design (Interaction Tiles) is a centralized approach based on a high level of semantic abstraction. The second design (Nodes) employs a distributed and localized approach, building upon laws of grouping from Gestalt psychology. A user experiment (n=15) was conducted, comparing both design solutions in the form of video prototypes, to gain insights into the mental models users construct when using the methods. Findings suggest that users’ mental models of the Nodes design are more accurate representations of the actual structure of the network and that it allows for the projection of different mental models. Furthermore, findings also suggest that this does not necessarily lead to increased usability or increased perceived value.

  • 4.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå Institute of Design, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Chapter 23: Unveiling the Expressivity of Complexity: Drifting in Design Research2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research is regarded to be a mode of inquiry particularly suited to engage with complex topics. In our work, we are interested in unpacking the complexity at the heart of an embodied aesthetic experience. In this article, through our digital and physical artefacts and a methodological reflection, we illustrate an ongoing design research project that a multi-disciplinary team of interaction designers, professional dancers, software developers, artists and 3D modelling experts are carrying out to develop insights on how to understand this complexity and how to use such insights as inspiration for interaction design-related projects. By embracing combinations of design, new technologies and simple visualisation tools, the project investigates the complex and hidden expressivity embedded in the skills of dancers in a programmatic design research approach. This investigation leads to insights on different levels. Firstly, cycles of formulation, realisation and reflection on design programs express parts of this complexity and this lets new research interests emerge. Secondly, as a body of work, reflecting on these cycles exposes how our “drifting” within this programmatic approach has started to unveil the complexities inherent in our research program. In this article we aim at contributing to the growing understanding of what designerly ways of knowing might be and how a practice aimed at expanding and contributing such knowledge unfolds.

  • 5.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Glaser, Pernilla
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Collevecchio, Carla
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Betancour, Ana
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    No Man is an Island. Situated Design Research and Wicked Impact2017In: The Design Journal, ISSN S3354-S3367, p. S3354-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this paper, we describe the research-through-design process that led to the realization of the interactive exhibition Charged Utopia that took place in August 2016 at the Norrbyskärs Museum. The design leveraged embodiment and active perception: visitors could activate the content by physically engaging with the space. These interactions were intended to trigger personal reflections on social coexistence, its paradoxes and challenges. The paper guides through the researchthrough-design process, from initial design direction and their theoretical grounding, to the design process and final event. The paper contributes with a reflection on the “wicked impact” of the event, suggesting that it is of relevance for design researchers that deal with societal issues, to discuss and expose the effects of their practice beyond immediate results.

  • 6.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Reflections on Designing for Aesthetic Engagement2015In: Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Research Through Design Conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been a clear shift in the Interaction Design community towards the design for engagement as opposed to more traditional ideals of efficiency and functionality. Our work explores how to design for aesthetic engagement in interaction; building on an approach founded on phenomenology, embodiment, pragmatist aesthetics and embodied cognition. In this paper, we present four different research through design projects we have undertaken, in which we leveraged this approach. These designs cover a wide range of contexts, scales and use. Together, they describe and open up a design space: each of the projects provides rich, aesthetic experiences that respect complexity and ambiguity. They entice people to engage with body and mind, where meaning arises in dialogue with the artifact. We present and critically reflect on these projects in the form of an annotated portfolio. Comparing and contrasting the project results reveals insights into our overall approach and research interest regarding how to design for engagement. We conclude with opportunities that these reflections offer for the design of engaging interactions. Furthermore, we expand on the implications that these reflections suggest towards further trajectories of practice-based research into such experiences.

  • 7.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    van der Veen, Rosa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Helgers, Ronald
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Långström, Olov
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Bambi, Martina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Universita di Bologna, Italy.
    Papworth, Nigel
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå School of Architecture, Sweden.
    Resisting Plastics for Ambiguous Results2019In: Proceedings of the 4th BiennialResearch Through Design Conference, 19-22 March 2019, Delft and Rotterdam, TheNetherlands,, Delft, 2019, article id 22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper illustrates present a constructive design research process centred around 3D printing with a wood-based material. This process was highly explorative: it involves the development of a new material and the use and hacking of a machine to materialize a design intention. Along the way, elements of craft emerge, as the designers develop skills in navigating the tensions that exist between material, machine and design intention.We present the process of navigating this design space by unpacking the act of making, using a digital fabrication technique, through a lens of craftsmanship. We employ the notions of ambiguity and resistance, to understand the factors and forces at play that may not typically be considered to be part of a highly automated digital fabrication method, such as 3D printing.As a result of this detailed reflection, new parts of the design space were articulated. All resistances appear as a result of the tension between and designer’s skills and intention, capabilities of the machine and possibilities of the material, all materialised in the Printed Future Vase.This publication contributes to the development of a new additive manufacturing method, and increases our awareness of what factors and forces are at play in this new additive manufacturing method, in which the development of the designer’s tacit skills have been articulated more explicitly.

  • 8.
    Ribul, Miriam
    et al.
    University of the Arts London, UK.
    de la Motte, Hanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Material Translation: Validation and Visualization as Transdisciplinary Methods for Textile Design and Materials Science in the Circular Bioeconomy2018In: Journal of Textile Design Research and Practice , ISSN 2051-1787, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 66-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a textile design and materials science collaboration during two design residencies in a materials science laboratory for regenerated cellulose research. The first residency evidenced that both disciplines are connected through a materials practice in communication and production of materials. This paper presents the aims of design and scientific research in materials experimentation and the scale of materials in each discipline. The cross-disciplinary collaboration developed transdisciplinary methods for textile design and materials science towards circularity of materials in a bioeconomy. A model for material affinity highlights these two new approaches between the design vision of the textiles designer and scientific method in materials science: validation and visualization. The collaboration led to establishing cellulose-based films as a process that can be made in both the design studio and the science laboratory. This paper presents how textile design prototyping in the materials science laboratory during the second residency was informed by scientific method in a transdisciplinary method of validation. Scientific communication of research is here presented as adopting visualization methods from design. Translation is presented as a term for the design-science material experiments taking place in the science laboratory in the collaboration between the authors. Improved communication between technical scientists and textile designers is needed to achieve circularity of regenerated cellulose materials in the emerging bioeconomy. This paper addresses translation as a process taking place during textile design residencies in the material science laboratory. The material experiments improved cross-disciplinary communication at the convergence of scientific method, design vision, visualization and validation processes.

  • 9.
    Ribul, Miriam
    et al.
    University of the Arts London, UK.
    de la Motte, Hanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    The Material Affinity of Design and Science for a Circular Economy2016In: Circular Transitions Proceedings, 2016, p. 236-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a design and material science collaboration in a science laboratory for regenerated cellulose. The material affinity outlines how both disciplines are connected through a materials practice in communication and production of cellulose films. The outcome presents new transdisciplinary approaches for design and science towards circularity of materials.

  • 10.
    Trotto, Ambra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    MoCap Tango: Materialising Movement Qualities2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, p. 10-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This video shows the ongoing design research project MoCap Tango. The project highlights the subtle qualities embedded in the physical dialogue between two tango dancers from a design perspective. Using custom-made wearables fitted with passive markers, in an optical Motion Capture System, the movements of two world-class tango dancers are captured. This data is used to experiment with real-time visualisations and 3D printed materialisations of the movements. The video presents the current state of the project, showing public performances in which the system was used as well as current work to use the data to create animations and 3D printed sculptures. Interviews with part of the design team highlight motivations for the project and discuss its relevance for embodied interaction design.

  • 11.
    Van der Veen, Rosa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Interactive. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Charged Utopia VR: Exploring Embodied Sense-Making in the Virtual Space2018In: Proceedings of TEI '18: 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI '18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2018, p. 292-298Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on preliminary results of a design research project that explores how spaces in virtual reality may be designed to build on qualities of embodied sensemaking. The project forms a basis for the exploration of an ethical dimension to interactions in virtual reality. This publication focuses on identifying qualities of embodied sense-making in an existing physical space, the interactive exhibition Charged Utopia. These qualities are transposed into a virtual interactive space. The translation of the qualities is done through the three main themes: Physical Movement, Resistance and Ambiguity. We present the design research process to describe how these themes were identified and transposed. We conclude with reflections that sketch ways in which we might capitalise on the opportunities offered by a virtual space, while respecting human skills in embodied sensemaking.

1 - 11 of 11
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