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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Kerstin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Safety and Transport, Safety.
    Framework for crisis planning: Four required areas for developing a learning process2016In: Journal of Emergency Management, ISSN 1543-5865, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 519-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To outline a framework for preparedness planning at the organizational level.The study is based on a content analysis of research literature as well as an analysis of interviews with six preparedness planners working in Swedish local authorities.The study setting included Swedish local authorities of different sizes.The participants are preparedness planners responsible for coordinating crisis management work in Swedish local authorities. The study includes preparedness planners with different backgrounds, education, experiences, and gender.A presentation of 19 factors of preparedness planning identified in the literature and a discussion around how preparedness planners perceive those factors.The main outcome measures are knowledge about how both researcher and practitioner understand and argue around different factors of preparedness planning.The result of this study is a framework for preparedness planning. As preparedness planning ought to be a learning process, the presented framework builds on four areas connected to learning: prerequisites for preparedness planning, who should be involved, what is to be learned, and how should the work be shaped.The analysis of factors identified in the literature and also in the interviews with preparedness planners illustrates that the four areas connected to learning are required for developing a preparedness planning process.

  • 2.
    Guldåker, Nicklas
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Kerstin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
    Nieminen Kristofersson, Tuija
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    Preventing and Preparing for Disasters: The Role of a Swedish Local Emergent Citizen Group2015In: International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, ISSN 0280-7270, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 360-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disasters such as the storms that affected Sweden in 2005 and 2007 showed that citizens initially conducted a large part of the disaster response, such as clearing roads, giving psychosocial support to affected neighbours and repairing power lines in collaboration with power companies. As a result of these storms, an Emergent Citizen Group (ECG) was established in a village which continued to work on risk prevention, even after the event. The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse this local emergent citizen group’s continuing work on the prevention of local risk and vulnerability, and particularly, their work on flood prevention. The results indicate that authorities seldom understand the ECG’s concerns about risks. Authorities also lack the experience and capacity to collaborate with, and support, the ECG’s risk and vulnerability reduction work. Bureaucratic barriers and declining motivation among volunteers within the ECGs could undermine commitment to the prevention of risks.

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