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  • 1.
    Berg, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Magnus
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Lindström, Annika
    RISE, Innventia. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Spreading joy: examining the effects of smiling models on consumer joy and attitudes2015In: Journal of Consumer Marketing, ISSN 0736-3761, E-ISSN 2052-1200, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 459-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer response to pictures of smiling models in marketing, focusing on the roles of emotional contagion from the smiling models and the perceived typicality of marketing with smiling models. Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports the findings from three experimental studies, comparing consumer response to two versions of an advertisement (Study 1) and a packaging design (Study 2 and 3), including either a picture of a smiling or a non-smiling model. To measure consumer response, a combination of self-report questionnaires and eye-tracking methodology was used. Findings – The pictures of smiling models produced more consumer joy and more positive attitudes for the marketing. The positive effects on attitudes were mediated by consumer joy, and the effects on consumer joy were mediated by the perceived typicality of the marketing with smiling models. Originality/value – Despite the ubiquity of photos of smiling faces in marketing, very few studies have isolated the effects of the smile appeal on consumer response to marketing objects. By comparing marketing where the same model is shown smiling or with a neutral facial expression, the positive effects were isolated. The roles of emotional contagion and perceived typicality in this mechanism were also examined and implications of the findings for research and practitioners are discussed.

  • 2.
    Brolin, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport.
    Fahnestock, Jesse
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment.
    Rootzen, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Industry’s Electrification and Role in the Future Electricity System: A Strategic Innovation Agenda2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Trends visible today suggest that a transformation of industrial firms’ use of electricity, and a change in their role in the electricity system, could take place as a part of a long-term transition towards a low-carbon Swedish economy. The shape of these changes remains highly uncertain, but electrification, flexible electricity use, and emerging roles in the electricity system for industrial consumers are interdependent developments and should be investigated from a holistic perspective where possible.

    Swedish industry is relatively energy intensive, and has stood for roughly 37% of the country’s electricity use for a decade. The Swedish Energy Agency’s Vivace scenario suggests that this share could expand, despite improved efficiency, to 49% by 2050. The increased use of electricity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and take advantage of market conditions would play out differently in different sectors, and depending on the development of different technologies. However large-scale opportunities may exist in the long-term, such as using electrolysis to produce hydrogen for replacing coke in the iron and steel industry and as a feedstock in the petrochemical industry.

    Smaller-scale but still important options for electrification include electric/hybrid boilers in the pulp and paper industry and a variety of electro-thermal technologies for heating and drying.

    Increased use of electricity in industry is likely to go hand-in-hand with increasingly flexible use of electricity. In some cases, such as the production of hydrogen or process media, this flexibility will be in-built since the storable energy carriers create new production planning options. In other cases, new approaches to planning, process design, and the use of automation may allow firms to match electricity use to favourable market conditions.

    The expected high penetration of intermittent renewable electricity in the power system may create incentives for this flexibility. These incentives should appear on the wholesale market, in the form of high- and low-price periods. They may also appear via new capacity markets, or through markets for new system services needed to support stability in both transmission and distribution networks. The frameworks and regulations needed to create these markets are not yet in place, and firms will also need to develop technical and management capabilities to take advantage of them.

  • 3.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation: a case study at a Swedish wood furniture wholesaler2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation at a Swedish wood furniture wholesaler. Design-driven innovation focuses on innovating the purpose a product has to a customer. This is a relatively new concept which is not yet thoroughly explored. A case study is conducted to identify the enablers and barriers to this type of innovation. In line with literature, the enablers were identified prior, throughout and after product development, whereas the barriers were only found in later phases. To conclude, this paper will present implications and suggestions for further research on the enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation.

  • 4.
    Dominic, Chris
    RISE, Innventia.
    Supply and demand chain integration:: A case study conducted in the packaging industry2013In: Packaging technology & science, ISSN 0894-3214, E-ISSN 1099-1522, no 1, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Grahn, Sten
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University.
    Friedler, Niklas
    Mälardalen University.
    Defining 'benefit' when making production investments: an inquiry of current standards2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Investments in production equipment are made to generate desired production benefit. This work examines how benefit generally is defined and to what extent the benefit is well defined when equipment investments are made. The study revealed that benefit from investments often is unclearly or inconsistently defined, with a narrow system view and often has a weak correlation with benefit for a production system with broader boundaries. This could hamper the possibility to capitalize on industrial trends that indicate a shift in focus, from products, to the benefit utilization of the products can deliver.

  • 6.
    Granlund, Anna
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University.
    Grahn, Sten
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
    Friedler, Niklas
    Mälardalen University.
    Lean automation development: applying lean principles to the automation development process2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By a broad empirical study it is indicated that automation development show potential of improvement. In the paper, 13 lean product development principles are contrasted to the automation development process and it is suggested why and how these principles can facilitate, support and improve the automation development process. The paper summarises a description of what characterises a lean automation development process and what consequences it entails. Main differences compared to current practice are also identified. The incentives for, and expected effects of, applying the identified lean principles to the automation development process are discussed. Lean automation development: applying lean principles to the automation development process. 

  • 7.
    Linder, Marcus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Williander, Mats
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Circular Business Model Innovation: Inherent Uncertainties2017In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 182-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular business models based on remanufacturing and reuse promise significant cost savings as well as radical reductions in environmental impact. Variants of such business models have been suggested for decades, and there are notable success stories such as the Xerox product–service offering based on photocopiers that are remanufactured. Still, we are not seeing widespread adoption in industry. This paper examines causes for reluctance. Drawing on a hypothesis‐testing framework of business model innovation, we show that circular business models imply significant challenges to proactive uncertainty reduction for the entrepreneur. Moreover, we show that many product–service system variants that facilitate return flow control in circular business models further aggravate the potential negative effects of failed uncertainty reduction because of increased capital commitments. Through a longitudinal action research study we also provide a counterexample to many of the challenges identified in previous studies, which could be overcome in the studied case.

  • 8.
    Mohammadi, Zahra
    et al.
    Mälardalen University .
    Shahbazi, Sasha
    Mälardalen University .
    Kurdve, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Critical Factors in Designing of Lean and Green Equipment2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing production equipment considering lean and related sustainability requirements may be a major factor in achieving productiveness through lean implementation. The objective of the study is to investigate the impact of lean production requirements on equipment design and how the lean requirements affects early design phases and global footprint. Data collection method includes literature review and in depth interviews with equipment users. The results provide support to importance of considering green and lean requirements in designing of production equipment by introducing important lean design factors for production equipment. These factors are designing simple equipment, error-proofing, being portable and flexible, supporting one piece flow, supporting short setup time, easy and reliable maintenance, supporting the operator interface with machine, safety of the operator, supporting production processes and layouts, energy efficiency, easy to operate, minimum cost, visualization, straight flows, teamwork, standardization, quality assurance, using pervious experiences, easy to clean, and easy to control. 

  • 9.
    Pousette, S.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Löfgren, M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Nilsson, B.
    Gustafsson, A.
    An extended method to measure overall consumer satisfaction with packaging2014In: Packaging technology & science, ISSN 0894-3214, E-ISSN 1099-1522, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 727-738Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Rex, Emma
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Fernqvist, Niklas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Ryding, Sven-Olof
    IVL, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Klas
    Akzo Nobel, Sweden.
    Ringström, Emma
    Akzo Nobel, Sweden.
    Landström, Lena
    Vattenfall, Sweden.
    Andréasson, Jessica
    Volvo Cars, Sweden.
    Widerberg, Anna
    Volvo Cars, Sweden.
    Dahllöf, Lisbeth
    Volvo Group, Sweden.
    Hallén Jorquera, Rebecka
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Tailored for decision – Knowing your target group prior to adaptation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life cycle thinking is but one perspective - if at all considered -, in everyday business decisions throughout the organization; in the selection of suppliers, in the strategy of new product ranges, and, in what information is chosen to be highlighted to the customers. Tradeoffs are constantly made between e.g. environment, quality, price and other company goals. Before any successful adaptation and visualization of life cycle information, it is important for internal life cycle experts to identify and understand how other functions of the company perceive and value life cycle information in their specific working situations.

    To get a better understanding of these internal users of life cycle information, life cycle experts in four multinational companies (Akzo Nobel, Vattenfall, Volvo Cars, Volvo Group) have joined forces with researchers in life cycle management and behavioral science to create a graphical map of how life cycle information is spread and used in different parts of an organization. The aim of the map is to be used as a basis for discussions and recommendations on how to tailor life cycle information in order to support decision making throughout a company.

    The map is constructed by combining a) inventories on how quantitative data seeks its way to internal users through databases, reports and KPIs, with b) qualitative interviews on goal framing and decision weights of e.g. environmental and economic information. As a result, the map illustrates both the “physical” flows of life cycle information and the “cognitive logics” of this information for different users (e.g. how values, attitudes and norms influence the target groups’ likelihood of including life cycle information in their decision processes).

    Based on the map, each company can identify and discuss who the main users of life cycle information are and what premises for life cycle thinking these users have: In what decision making situation is, or can, life cycle information be used? How is the information understood? What other sources of information and rationales for decisions are used in parallel to, or in conflict with, LCA-results?

    Initial analyses on the usefulness of the map point to a better understanding of how life cycle experts can tailor information for decisions in different parts of the company, as well as on its usefulness in illustrating to people outside of the environmental departments the widespread use of life cycle information that already exist in the company. The latter is not least important for creating an understanding in how the organization respond to ongoing external pressure to focus more on a life cycle approach, e.g. new requirements in ISO 14001, new EU Directives on public procurement and current EU work to establish a common LCA methodology.   

  • 11. Roos, A.
    et al.
    Lindström, M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Heuts, L.
    Hylander, N.
    Lind, E.
    Nielsen, C.
    Innovation diffusion of new wood-based materials - reducing the "time to market"2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 394-401Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Smith, Göran
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, Viktoria.
    Sandberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Barriers to innovating with open government data: Exploring experiences across service phases and user types2018In: Information Polity, ISSN 1570-1255, E-ISSN 1875-8754, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 249-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open government data (OGD) can enable outbound open innovation (OI) that is beneficial to society. However, innovation barriers hinder OGD users from generating value. While previous studies have detailed a large number of such barriers, little is known of how different types of OGD users are affected, and when the barriers appear in their innovation processes. To this end, this paper describes a case study of distributed service development in the Swedish public transport sector. The contribution to extant research is twofold. Firstly, based on an inductive analysis, three OGD user archetypes are proposed: employees, entrepreneurs and hobbyists. Secondly, the study finds that the significance of distinct innovation barriers varies across phases of the services’ lifecycles and depending on the OGD users’ motivation, objective, pre-conditions and approach. Drawing on these insights, we propose that OGD initiatives aimed at facilitating outbound OI to a greater extent should address the barriers that appear during diffusion of innovations, the barriers that are not directly related to the OGD provision, and the barriers that are experienced by non-obvious OGD user groups.

1 - 12 of 12
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