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  • 1.
    Archer, Nicholas
    et al.
    CSIRO, Australia; Örebro University, Sweden.
    Cochet-Broch, Maeva
    CSIRO, Australia.
    Mihnea, Mihaela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Garrido Banuelos, Gonzalo
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Lundin, Leif
    CSIRO, Australia.
    Frank, Damian
    CSIRO, Australia.
    Sodium Reduction in Bouillon: Targeting a Food Staple to Reduce Hypertension in Sub-saharan Africa2022Ingår i: Frontiers in Nutrition, E-ISSN 2296-861X, Vol. 9, artikel-id 746018Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Bouillon cubes are a staple ingredient used in Sub-saharan African countries providing flavor enhancement to savory foods. Bouillon has been identified as a vehicle for fortification to overcome micronutrient deficiencies in Sub-saharan Africa. However, bouillon has a high sodium content (and in addition with other foods) contributes to dietary sodium intake above recommended guidelines. High dietary sodium intake is a key risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Africa has the highest rates of hypertension and CVD globally with nearly half the adult population above 25 years affected. This review presents current state of research on sodium reduction strategies in bouillon. The key challenge is to reduce sodium levels while maintaining optimal flavor at the lowest possible production cost to ensure bouillon continues to be affordable in Sub-saharan Africa. To produce lower sodium bouillon with acceptable flavor at low cost will likely involve multiple sodium reduction strategies; direct reduction in sodium, sodium replacement and saltiness boosting flavor technologies. Efforts to reduce the sodium content of bouillon in Sub-saharan Africa is a worthwhile strategy to: (i) lower the overall sodium consumption across the population, and (ii) deliver population-wide health benefits in a region with high rates of hypertension and CVD. Copyright © 2022 Archer, Cochet-Broch, Mihnea, Garrido-Bañuelos, Lopez-Sanchez, Lundin and Frank.

  • 2.
    Bryngelsson, Susanne
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Moshtaghian, Hanieh
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Bianchi, Marta Angela
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Nutritional assessment of plant-based meat analogues on the Swedish market2022Ingår i: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, ISSN 0963-7486, E-ISSN 1465-3478, Vol. 73, nr 7, s. 889-901Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutritional quality of 142 plant-based meat analogues (PBMAs) on the Swedish market were assessed by nutritional contribution (NC) to recommended nutrient intake, three labelling systems (Keyhole, Nutri-Score, nutrition claims) and comparisons to meat references. Based on median (min-max) NC for macronutrients, PBMAs in general appeared as healthy options to meat due to higher NC per 100 g for fibre [PBMAs: 15% (1-33%) vs meat: 0% (0-2%)] and lower NC for saturated fat [PBMAs: 4% (0-59%) vs meat: 15% (1-51%)]. The NC per 100 g for salt was substantial for both PBMAs [25% (5-52%)] and meat [24% (2-55%)]. Limited data for micronutrients indicated that PBMAs are higher in iron compared to meat. Nutrition quality varied both between and within product categories. Mince, bite/fillet and nugget analogues were the main healthier categories, according to labelling systems. Bioavailability of iron, protein quality and effects of processing are important future aspects to consider. © 2022 The Author(s).

  • 3.
    Hallström, Elinor
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Bajzelj, B
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Håkansson, N
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjons, Josefin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Åkesson, A
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wolk, A
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Dietary climate impact: Contribution of foods and dietary patterns by gender and age in a Swedish population2021Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 306, artikel-id 127189Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary climate impact in a Swedish population (56–95 years old) was estimated based on self-reported food intake from 50 000 men and women within two population-based cohorts and on climate data, covering emissions from farm to fork, for 600 foods representative for the Swedish market. Aims were to assess variation in dietary climate impact between population groups and between food categories. Mean dietary climate impact was 2.0 tons of CO2e/person/year, with about a threefold variation between high and low impact individuals. Food loss and waste accounted for 18%. Older individuals and women on average had lower total dietary climate impact per year, while differences between gender were smaller per 1000 kcal. Climate impact was greatly affected by dietary composition and especially by the content of animal-based and discretionary foods, responsible for 71% and 12% of total climate impact, respectively. Results indicate a large potential for reduced climate impact by adopting realistic dietary patterns. Suggested strategies to reach climate goals include reduction of red meat and prioritising lower impact foods within meat, dairy and seafood categories, limited consumption of discretionary foods and decreased over-consumption of total calories, combined with improvements in production including reduction of food loss and waste.

  • 4.
    Heredia-Martinez, A.
    et al.
    Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Rosa-Diez, G.
    Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Ferraris, J. R.
    Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Sohlenius-Sternbeck, Anna-Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Kemisk och farmaceutisk toxikologi.
    Nihlen, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Olsson, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lundberg, J. O.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Weitzberg, E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Carlström, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Krmar, R. T.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Plasma Nitrate and Nitrite Kinetics after Single Intake of Beetroot Juice in Adult Patients on Chronic Hemodialysis and in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized, Single-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study2022Ingår i: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 14, nr 12, artikel-id 2480Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to maintaining normal cardiovascular and renal function. NO is generally formed enzymatically by NO synthase in the vascular endothelium. NO bioactivity can also be attributed to dietary intake of inorganic nitrate, which is abundant in our diet, especially in green leafy vegetables and beets. Ingested nitrate is reduced to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria and further to NO systemically. Previous studies have shown that dialysis, by means of removing nitrate and nitrite from the body, can reduce NO bioactivity. Hence, dietary intervention approaches aimed to boost the nitrate–nitrite–NO pathway may be of benefit in dialysis patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the kinetics of plasma nitrate and nitrite after a single intake of nitrate-rich concentrated beetroot juice (BJ) in adult hemodialysis (HD) patients and in healthy volunteers (HV). Eight HD patients and seven HV participated in this single center, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Each participant received a sequential single administration of active BJ (70 mL 400 mg nitrate) and placebo BJ (70 mL 0 mg nitrate) in a random order separated by a washout period of seven days. For the kinetic analysis, blood samples were collected at different time-points before and up to 44 h after BJ intake. Compared with placebo, active BJ significantly increased plasma nitrate and nitrite levels both in HD patients and HV. The area under the curve and the maximal concentration of plasma nitrate, but not of nitrite, were significantly higher in HD patients as compared with HV. In both groups, active BJ ingestion did not affect blood pressure or plasma potassium levels. Both BJs were well tolerated in all participants with no adverse events reported. Our data provide useful information in planning dietary nitrate supplementation efficacy studies in patients with reduced NO bioactivity. © 2022 by the authors. 

  • 5.
    Hidaka, R.
    et al.
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Masuda, Y.
    Matsumoto Dental University, Japan.
    Ogawa, K.
    Food Care Co Ltd, Japan.
    Tanaka, T.
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Kanazawa, M.
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Suzuki, K.
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel. Chalmers university of Technology, Sweden.
    Iijima, K.
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Matsuo, K.
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Impact of the Comprehensive Awareness Modification of Mouth, Chewing and Meal (CAMCAM) Program on the Attitude and Behavior Towards Oral Health and Eating Habits as Well as the Condition of Oral Frailty: A Pilot Study2023Ingår i: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 27, nr 5, s. 340-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Preserving sufficient oral function and maintaining adequate nutrition are essential for preventing physical frailty and the following long-term care. We recently developed the 6-month Comprehensive Awareness Modification of Mouth, Chewing And Meal (CAMCAM) program, in which participants gather monthly to learn about oral health and nutrition while eating a textured lunch together. This study examined whether the CAMCAM program could improve attitude and behavior towards oral health, mastication, and diet as well as ameliorate oral frailty in community-dwelling older adults. Design: Single-arm pre-post comparison study. Setting and Participants: A total of 271 community-dwelling adults (72.3 ± 5.7 years of age; 159 women [58.7%]) in 4 Japanese municipalities were recruited, of which 249 participants (92%) were assessed at the final evaluation. Intervention: Participants gathered once a month at community centers to learn about oral health and nutrition while eating a “munchy” textured lunch containing proper nutrition. Measurements: Oral frailty, frailty, and eating behavior were evaluated with the Oral Frailty Index-8 (OFI-8), Kihon checklist (KCL), and CAMCAM checklist, respectively. Participants were divided into Oral frailty (OF) and Robust groups according to OFI-8 scores. The differences in KCL and CAMCAM checklist results between the OF and Robust groups were statistically tested along with changes in scores after the program. Results: KCL and CAMCAM checklist scores were significantly lower in the OF group at the initial assessment. OFI-8 and KCL findings were significantly improved in the OF group after completing the program (all P <0.05). Regarding the CAMCAM checklist, awareness of chewing improved significantly in the Robust group (P=0.009), with a similar tendency in the OF group (P=0.080). Conclusion: The findings of this pilot study suggest that the CAMCAM program may improve both oral and systemic frailty in addition to attitudes towards chewing, oral health, and meals, especially in individuals with oral frailty. The CAMCAM program merits expansion as a community-based frailty prevention program. 

  • 6.
    Hornborg, Sara
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Biovetenskap och material, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Biovetenskap och material, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Biovetenskap och material, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Bergman, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Biovetenskap och material, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Troell, Max
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden.
    Jonell, Malin
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Patrik
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden; WorldFish, Malaysia.
    Frisk med fisk utan risk?: Betydelsen av svensk konsumtion av sjömat för hälsa och miljö2019Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Seafood is a diverse food commodity, comprising of over 2 500 species from capture fisheries and over 600 species from farming, with vast differences between production methods. Dietary advice often includes recommendations to increase consumption of seafood, based on health benefits and that seafood may be produced with less environmental impacts and resources use compared to many other animal-based foods. However, at the same time, there are frequent media alarms related to potential health risks (some species have diet restrictions) and destructive production practices from both fisheries and aquaculture. As a result, there is often confusion on which seafood to eat or not to eat.The aim of this report is primarily to collate available information on health risks and benefits of Swedish seafood consumption, and to combine this with environmental aspects (focus on carbon footprint).Around 40 seafood products consumed in Sweden were included in the analysis. Potential health risks could only be included qualitatively, since the collected data is risk-based and thus not all products are sampled. It was found that the nutritional content and carbon footprint vastly differ between species. There were also several data gaps identified, such as the need for more detailed data on performance from different production systems. The combined assessment of nutritional value and carbon footprint categorised some species as win-win in terms of nutritional content and environmental pressures (such as small pelagic fish), while others could be more categorised as having less nutritional value and with high environmental costs (such as Northern prawn) respectively.The report provides decision support for further data collection needed to enable combined assessment of nutritional risks, benefits and environmental sustainability of seafood products. Results may be used to discuss suitable level of details of dietary advice.

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  • 7.
    Lindroos, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Swedish Food Agency, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moraeus, Lotta
    Swedish Food Agency, Sweden.
    Strid, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Winkvist, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Umeå university, Sweden.
    Dietary Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Diet Quality in a Cross-Sectional Study of Swedish Adolescents2023Ingår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 118, nr 5, s. 956-965Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interventions to improve dietary intake and reduce dietary greenhouse gas emissions (dGHGE) are urgently needed. Adolescence presents a unique time in life to promote sustainable diets. Detailed dietary data are needed to inform public health strategies aiming at improving adolescents’ diet quality and reducing dGHGE. Objective: This study aimed to describe dGHGE in Swedish adolescents’ diets by socio-demographic characteristics, evaluate how food groups contribute to dGHGE, and examine dGHGE in relation to diet quality. Methods: Data come from the national, school-based, cross-sectional dietary survey Riksmaten Adolescents 2016-17 of 3099 females and males attending school grades 5 (11–12 y old), 8 (14–15 y old) and 11 (17–18 y old). Participants completed 2 web-based 24-h recalls and questionnaires on lifestyle factors. dGHGE was estimated based on life cycle assessment data. Diet quality was estimated using NRF11.3 (Nutrient Rich Food Index) and SHEIA15 (Swedish Healthy Eating Index for Adolescents 2015). Results: dGHGE were higher in males than females (medians 4.2 versus 3.8 kg CO2e/10 MJ, P < 0.001). In females, dGHGE were highest in grade 5 (4.0 kg CO2e/10MJ), whereas in males, emissions were highest in grade 11 (4.4 kg CO2e/10MJ), P < 0.001 for the sex/grade interaction. Overweight/obesity was positively associated with CO2e/10MJ, but parental education, birthplace, and degree of urbanization were not. In females, the proportion of dGHGE from animal-based foods was lowest in grade 11, whereas the proportions from plant-based foods and sweet foods/beverages were highest. In males, these proportions were similar across grades. NRF11.3 was not associated with CO2e/10MJ, whereas healthier eating, according to SHEIA15, was inversely associated with CO2e/10MJ. Conclusions: Food choices and dGHGE per calorie differ by sex in adolescents. Thus, intervention strategies to improve dietary sustainability need to be tailored differently to females and males. Diet quality should also be considered when promoting reduced GHGE diets.

  • 8.
    Oliveira, H.
    et al.
    University of Porto, Portugal; Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, Portugal.
    Raaholt, Birgitta
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Nunes, M. L.
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Semi-industrial development of nutritious and healthy seafood dishes from sustainable species2021Ingår i: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 155, artikel-id 112431Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to devise innovative, tailor-made, appealing, tasty and semi-industrialized dishes, using sustainable and under-utilized seafood species (bib, common dab, common carp, blue mussel and blue whiting), that can meet the specific nutritional and functional needs of children (8-10-years), pregnant women (20-40-years) and seniors (≥60-years). Hence, contests were organised among cooking schools from 6 European countries and the best recipes/dishes were reformulated, semi-industrially produced and chemically and microbiologically evaluated. The dishes intended for: (i) children and pregnant women had EPA + DHA and I levels that reached the target quantities, supporting the claim as “high in I”; and (ii) seniors were “high in protein” (24.8%-Soup_S and 34.0%-Balls_S of the energy was provided by proteins), “high in vitamin B12”, and had Na contents (≤0.4%) below the defined limit. All dishes reached the vitamin D target value. Sausages_C, Roulade_P, Fillet_P and Balls_S had a well-balanced protein/fat ratio. Roulade_P presented the highest n-3 PUFA/n-6 PUFA ratio (3.3), while Sausages_C the lowest SFA/UNS ratio (0.2). Dishes were considered safe based on different parameters (e.g. Hg-T, PBDEs, Escherichia coli). All represent dietary sources contributing to meet the reference intakes of target nutrients (33->100%), providing valuable options to overcome nutritional and functional imbalances of the three groups. 

  • 9.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Lindroos, Anna Karin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Food Agency, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Berndt
    University Umeå, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingegärd
    University Umeå, Sweden.
    Winkvist, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University Umeå, Sweden.
    Adherence to the Swedish dietary guidelines and the impact on mortality and climate in a population-based cohort study2023Ingår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 26, s. 2333-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the associations between adherence to the Swedish dietary guidelines and all-cause mortality and thus assessing the index' ability to predict health outcomes, as well as levels of dietary greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs). Design: A longitudinal study 1990-2016 within the population-based cohort Västerbotten Intervention Programme. Dietary data were based on food frequency questionnaires. Diet quality was assessed by the Swedish Healthy Eating Index for Adults 2015 (SHEIA15), based on the 2015 Swedish dietary guidelines. Dietary GHGEs were estimated from life cycle assessment data including emissions from farm to industry gate. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of all-cause mortality were evaluated with Cox proportional hazards regression, and differences in median GHGEs were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA test, between quintiles of SHEIA15 score. Setting: Northern Sweden. Participants: In total, 49,124 women and 47,651 men, aged 35-65 years. Results: Median follow-up times were 16.0 years for women and 14.7 years for men, during which time 3074 women and 4212 men died. A consistent trend of lower all-cause mortality HRs for both sexes with higher SHEIA15 scores was demonstrated. For women, the all-cause mortality HR was 0.81 [(95% CI 0.71-0.92); p=0.001] and for men 0.90 [(95% CI 0.81-0.996); p=0.041] between the quintile with the highest SHEIA15 score compared with the quintile with the lowest SHEIA15 score. A consistent trend of lower estimated dietary GHGEs among both sexes with higher SHEIA15 scores was also found. Conclusions: Adherence to Swedish dietary guidelines, estimated by SHEIA15, seems to promote longevity and reduce dietary climate impact. © The Authors 2023.

  • 10.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Lindroos, Anna Karin
    Swedish Food Agency, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Winkvist, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Adherence to the Swedish Dietary Guidelines and the Impact on Mortality and Climate in a Population-Based Cohort Study2022Ingår i: Current Developments in Nutrition, E-ISSN 2475-2991, Vol. 6, nr Suppl 1, s. 950-950Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract <sec> Objectives <p>To assess 1) the association between adherence to the Swedish dietary guidelines and all-cause mortality, and 2) the difference in greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) from diets of participants with higher and lower adherence to the Swedish dietary guidelines.</p> </sec> <sec> Methods <p>Dietary data from the Swedish population-based cohort Västerbotten Intervention Programme (49,124 women and 47,651 men, 35–65 years at baseline), collected between the years 1990–2016, were used. Diet quality was assessed by the Swedish Healthy Eating Index for Adults 2015 (SHEIA15). SHEIA15 is based on the Swedish dietary guidelines from 2015, and includes assessments of intakes of vegetables and fruits, seafood, whole grains, fiber, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, red and processed meat and added sugar. GHGE of diets were estimated from life cycle assessment data, including CO<sub>2</sub>e from primary production to industry gate. Information on all-cause mortality was acquired from registers at the National Board of Health and Welfare in Sweden using personal identification numbers. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression, comparing the lowest and highest quintile of SHEIA15 score. Potential confounders were adjusted for. Difference in GHGE of diets was compared between the lowest and highest quintile of SHEIA15 score, using the Mann Whitney U test.</p> </sec> <sec> Results <p>Median follow-up times were for women 16.0 years and for men 14.7 years, during which time 3074 women and 4212 men died. For women the highest SHEIA15 score was associated with lower mortality compared with the lowest score (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.98; P = 0.027). No statistically significant difference in HR of mortality was found for the men with the highest SHEIA15 score compared with the lowest score (HR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.82, 1.01; P = 0.083). The participants with the highest score of SHEIA15 had lower dietary GHGE compared to those with the lowest score in both women and men (P &lt; 0.001).</p> </sec> <sec> Conclusions <p>Higher adherence to the Swedish dietary guidelines, estimated by SHEIA15, was associated with lower all-cause mortality for women, but not for men, and indicated lower GHGE from diets for both women and men.</p> </sec> <sec> Funding Sources <p>The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas).</p> </sec>

  • 11.
    Strid, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Winkvist, Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Toward a More Climate-Sustainable Diet: Possible Deleterious Impacts on Health When Diet Quality Is Ignored2023Ingår i: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 153, nr 1, s. 242-252Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Nutritional quality, and health and climate impacts are important considerations in the design of sustainable diets. Objectives To investigate the association between diets varying in nutrient density and climate impact and MI and stroke HRs. Methods Dietary data of 41,194 women and 39,141 men (35–65 y) who participated in a Swedish population-based cohort study were employed. Nutrient density was calculated using the Sweden-adapted Nutrient Rich Foods 11.3 index. Dietary climate impact was calculated with data from life cycle assessments, including greenhouse gas emissions from primary production to industry gate. HRs and 95% CIs for MI and stroke were assessed with multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression, comparing a least-desirable diet scenario reference group (lower nutrient density, higher climate impact) with three diet groups that varied with respect to higher/lower nutrient density and higher/lower climate impact. Results Median follow-up time from the baseline study visit to MI or stroke diagnosis was 15.7 y for women and 12.8 y for men. The MI hazard was significantly higher for the men with diets of lower nutrient density and lower climate impact (HR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.33; P = 0.004), compared with the reference group. No significant association with MI was observed for any of the diet groups of women. No significant association with stroke was observed among any of the diet groups of women or men. Conclusions The results among men suggest some adverse health effects for men when diet quality is not considered in the pursuit of more climate-sustainable diets. For women, no significant associations were detected. The mechanism underlying this association for men needs further investigation.

  • 12.
    Stubbendorff, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ramne, Stina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Drake, Isabel
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Development of an EAT-Lancet index and its relation to mortality in a Swedish population.2022Ingår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 115, nr 3, s. 705-716Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Current global food systems threaten human health and environmental sustainability. In 2019, the EAT-Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems defined the first global reference diet to improve both areas, but there is no consensus on how to quantify the EAT-Lancet reference diet as a diet index and its relation to mortality has not been widely studied. OBJECTIVE: To develop a new dietary index to quantify adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet and assess its association with mortality in a large population-based Swedish cohort. We also examined food components included in the index and their individual associations with mortality. DESIGN: We used the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (n = 22,421, 45-73 years at baseline). Dietary data were collected using a modified diet history method. The EAT-Lancet index was developed based on intake levels and reference intervals of 14 food components defined in the EAT-Lancet diet (0-3 points per component, 0-42 points in total). Associations with mortality were examined based on registers during a mean of 20 years of follow-up and were adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Divided into five adherence groups, the highest adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet (≥23 points) was associated with lower all-cause mortality (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.85), cancer mortality (HR 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.92) and cardiovascular mortality (HR 0.68; 95% CI: 0.54, 0.84) than the lowest adherence (≤13 points). Several food components included in the index contributed to the observed reductions in mortality. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a new dietary index to investigate adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet. The findings indicate a 25% lower risk of mortality among those with the highest adherence to the EAT-Lancet diet, as defined using our index, which adds to the evidence base for the development of sustainable dietary guidelines.

  • 13.
    Zamaratskaia, Galia
    et al.
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Czeck Republic.
    Gerhardt, Karin
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden;.
    Knický, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, Sweden; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Buckwheat: an underutilized crop with attractive sensory qualities and health benefits.2023Ingår i: Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, ISSN 1040-8398, E-ISSN 1549-7852Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The pseudocereal buckwheat is one of the ancient domesticated crops. The aim of the present review was to outline the potential of buckwheat as an agricultural crop and brings studies on buckwheat into a new larger perspective combining current knowledge in agricultural history and practice, nutritional and sensory properties, as well as possible benefits to human health. Historically, buckwheat was an appreciated crop because of its short growth period, moderate requirements for growth conditions, and high adaptability to adverse environments. Nowadays, interest in buckwheat-based food has increased because of its nutritional composition and many beneficial properties for human health. Buckwheat is a rich course of proteins, dietary fibers, vitamins, minerals, and bioactive compounds, including flavonoids. Moreover, it contains no gluten and can be used in the production of gluten-free foods for individuals diagnosed with celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, or wheat protein allergies. Buckwheat is traditionally used in the production of various foods and can be successfully incorporated into various new food formulations with positive effects on their nutritional value and attractive sensory properties. Further research is needed to optimize buckwheat-based food development and understand the mechanism of the health effects of buckwheat consumption on human well-being.

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