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  • 1.
    Almstrand, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bredberg, Anna
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Material och produktion, Metodik för produktframtagning.
    Runström Eden, Gunilla
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Assenhöj, Maria
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Koca, Hatice
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olin, Anna-Carin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Tinnerberg, Håkan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    An explorative study on respiratory health among operators working in polymer additive manufacturing2023Ingår i: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, artikel-id 1148974Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing (AM), or 3D printing, is a growing industry involving a wide range of different techniques and materials. The potential toxicological effects of emissions produced in the process, involving both ultrafine particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are unclear, and there are concerns regarding possible health implications among AM operators. The objective of this study was to screen the presence of respiratory health effects among people working with liquid, powdered, or filament plastic materials in AM. Methods: In total, 18 subjects working with different additive manufacturing techniques and production of filament with polymer feedstock and 20 controls participated in the study. Study subjects filled out a questionnaire and underwent blood and urine sampling, spirometry, impulse oscillometry (IOS), exhaled NO test (FeNO), and collection of particles in exhaled air (PEx), and the exposure was assessed. Analysis of exhaled particles included lung surfactant components such as surfactant protein A (SP-A) and phosphatidylcholines. SP-A and albumin were determined using ELISA. Using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and targeted mass spectrometry, the relative abundance of 15 species of phosphatidylcholine (PC) was determined in exhaled particles. The results were evaluated by univariate and multivariate statistical analyses (principal component analysis). Results: Exposure and emission measurements in AM settings revealed a large variation in particle and VOC concentrations as well as the composition of VOCs, depending on the AM technique and feedstock. Levels of FeNO, IOS, and spirometry parameters were within clinical reference values for all AM operators. There was a difference in the relative abundance of saturated, notably dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (PC16:0_16:0), and unsaturated lung surfactant lipids in exhaled particles between controls and AM operators. Conclusion: There were no statistically significant differences between AM operators and controls for the different health examinations, which may be due to the low number of participants. However, the observed difference in the PC lipid profile in exhaled particles indicates a possible impact of the exposure and could be used as possible early biomarkers of adverse effects in the airways. 

  • 2.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Rosén, Gunnar
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Motivational factors for occupational safety and health improvements: A mixed-method study within the Swedish equine sector2023Ingår i: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 159, artikel-id 106035Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-functioning systematic occupational safety and health management is beneficial for both individuals and organizations, and employee motivation seems to be crucial for positive outcomes. Occupational safety and health issues are a major concern for the Swedish equine sector since the work environment in horse stables is known to be characterized by low mechanization, high physical workloads, and high injury risks. The purpose of this study was to gain an increased understanding of how systematic occupational safety and health management is performed and which factors that influence motivation for occupational safety and health improvements in the Swedish equine sector. An explanatory sequential mixed-methods study, based on quantitative data from questionnaires and qualitative data from semi-structured interviews, was conducted. Various statistical analyses were performed to obtain quantitative data and an abductive applied thematic analysis was applied for the qualitative data. The results indicate that both intrinsic motivators, i.e. attitudes, values, and influence, as well as contextual factors such as motivational management, occupational culture, and workplace resources, influence compliance in systematic occupational safety and health management and participation in occupational safety and health improvements, which in turn affect workplace outcomes regarding safety and health. The positive relationship found between an implemented and functioning systematic occupational safety and health management and employee motivation for occupational safety and health improvements indicate the importance of employee involvement and participation. Understanding the motivational factors for occupational safety and health improvements from an employee perspective is an important step to creating healthy and sustainable workplaces.

  • 3.
    Dahlbom, Sixten
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Säkerhet och transport, Brand och Säkerhet.
    Mallin, Tove
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Säkerhet och transport, Brand och Säkerhet.
    Bobert, Magnus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Säkerhet och transport, Brand och Säkerhet.
    Fire Test Performance of Eleven PFAS-Free Class B Firefighting Foams Varying Fuels, Admixture, Water Types and Foam Generation Techniques2022Ingår i: Fire technology, ISSN 0015-2684, E-ISSN 1572-8099, Vol. 58, nr 3, s. 1639-1665Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The firefighting performance of eleven PFAS-free firefighting foams was evaluated using different fuels (Jet A1, commercial heptane and diesel) and types of water (freshwater and synthetic sea water). Moreover, different firefighting foam generation techniques and application methods were evaluated. The firefighting foams were generated as aspirated foams or as compressed air foams (CAFs). The results for CAF showed a higher performance, with respect to extinction time and burn-back resistance, compared to the foam generated using a UNI 86 nozzle. The CAF was not optimised, indicating a further potential of this foam generation technique. The results indicate that the time to fire knockdown decreases with decreasing foam viscosity. The heat flux was shown to be small, although the entire fuel surface was involved in the fire. The tests showed a dependence on fuel type; different products performed differently depending on the fuel. Tests using sea water showed that addition of salt to the foam solution generally prolonged the extinction time, although for one of the firefighting foams a shorter extinction time was observed. Out of the eleven evaluated PFAS-free products there was no product that outperformed the rest. None of the products in the study met the fire test performance requirements in all the referenced standards. Instead, the products seem to have different niches where they perform best e.g., with different types of fuel or water.

  • 4.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Yngve, Moa
    Linköping University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Melin, Jeanette
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Säkerhet och transport, Mätteknik.
    Initial evaluation of measurement properties of the Work Environment Impact Questionnaire (WEIQ) - using Rasch analysis2024Ingår i: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 22, nr 1, artikel-id 43Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To provide both preventive and rehabilitative conditions in a workplace, one must understand how employees experience work demands. Such an understanding can be obtained from each individual with valid and quality-assured questionnaires. The Work Environment Impact Questionnaire (WEIQ) is a new questionnaire for measuring employees’ self-perceived work ability in relation to their specific workplace environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the measurement properties in terms of construct validity of the WEIQ. Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted with 288 respondents from three different workplaces involving assisted living personnel, vocational rehabilitation personnel and personnel at a research institute. The measurement properties of the WEIQ were assessed according to Rasch Measurement Theory (RMT), including assessment of item-to-sample targeting, threshold ordering, item fit statistics, unidimensionality and reliability. Results: Item fit, i.e., fit residuals, item characteristic curves (ICC) and chi square values, were all satisfactory, and no disordered thresholds were present after collapsing the lowest response categories. However, issues with local dependent (LD) item correlations was present in 7.6% cases, four items showed statistically significant differential item functioning (DIF), where 11% of the respondents had person fit residuals outside the recommended range of ± 2.5 and the t-test for unidimensionality did not meet the criterion of 5%. Scale-to-sample targeting and reliability (0.92) were good. LD could be resolved with testlets and at the same time maintaining fit and improving dimensionality, but then the reliability decreased to 0.82. Conclusions: This study provides an initial validation of the WEIQ to be used for assessing employees’ self-perceived work ability. Most measurement properties were acceptable, but further exploration of LD, DIF and unidimensionality in additional work settings and with larger sample sizes is warranted. Trial registration: Not applicable.

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  • 5.
    Gunbeyaz, Sefer Anil
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Giagloglou, Evanthia
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Kurt, Rafet Emek
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Garmer Rogge, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Alkaner, Selim
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    McKenna, Stuart A
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Turan, Osman
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Lord, Richard
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Workers' exposure to dust and potentially toxic elements during steel cutting in two ship dismantling cases2023Ingår i: Ocean Engineering, ISSN 0029-8018, E-ISSN 1873-5258, Vol. 270, artikel-id 113628Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ship dismantling is the recommended recycling solution for the end of a ship's life, but the process is not free of occupational risk. Despite proper regulations, there are underlying chemical and physical hazards, mainly due to the cutting of steel parts, which is the core of the recycling process. The overall aim of this research study is to determine, in two case study examples, the ship recycling workers' potential occupational exposure by inhalation of chemical agents generated by the torch cutting process of coated and de-coated steel. This was carried out specifically through (i) monitoring and measuring ship recycling workers' local environment for the inhalable (total dust) and respirable (fine dust) fractions during their working operations, (ii) analysing the heavy metal content of the dust and (iii) calculating and comparing this against occupational exposure limits, (iv) comparing de-coating operations with cutting of coated and de-coated steel. Results of this study show that without further mitigation workers involved in torch cutting processes are at high risk of exposure to heavy metals by inhalation as these are exceeding the norms defined by regulatory bodies. © 2023 The Authors

  • 6.
    Hägg, Göran
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Kihlstedt, Annika
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Checkout cashier work and counter design: Video movement analysis, musculoskeletal disorders and customer interaction2011Ingår i: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 41, nr 3, s. 201-207Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted in order to analyse checkout cashiers’ movements at a checkout counter during interaction with customers and the prevalence of work-related stress and musculoskeletal disorders in checkout cashiers. In one shop, six cashiers were videotaped during the workday, and 50 cashiers from seven shops from the same chain of stores responded a questionnaire. Cashier activities and movements, customer interaction and counter design issues were analysed from the video data. Prevalence of work-related stress and musculoskeletal disorders was obtained from the questionnaire. It was found that 76% of all items were manually turned or angled. With a better adjustment of the scanner and a standardised positioning of the EAN-code, many of these movements could be avoided. Furthermore the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was quite high (68% for the neck). The questionnaire results showed that many cashiers experienced stress, giving a high percentage of cashiers in the “dedication under pressure” group. The behaviour of the customers was the major cause of stress. Other sources of stress arose from bad design or function of the computer system or other technical equipment. Relevance to industry: In this study several problems regarding cashier work were identified and solutions, relevant to counter and package designers, shop managers and cashiers are suggested. Data obtained on cashier movements and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders are given.

  • 7.
    Lindahl, Cecilia
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    University Dalarna, Sweden.
    Bendroth, Margareta
    Hushållningssällskapet Sjuhärad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    University Dalarna, Sweden.
    Improving work environment and safety within the Swedish equine sector through novel methods and tools2021Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The work environment in horse stables is known to be characterized by low mechanization, high physical workloads and high injury risks. The Swedish Work Environment Authority has also reported a lack of knowledge in the systematic work environment management and risk assessments as well as shortcomings regarding work environment and work conditions in the Swedish equine sector. The aim of this study was to identify, adapt and implement methods and tools for systematic work environment management, with emphasis on characteristics to stimulate motivation and commitment at work, in order to improve the work environment in the sector. The study had a participatory action research approach, and were conducted at four workplaces, two riding schools and two trotting stables, in Sweden. The employees were guided to identify the challenges in their work environment, both physical and organizational, through a combination of methods including surveys, interviews and observations. A workshop with the employees was then organized to discuss and prioritize actions needed to improve the work environment based on the identified needs, resulting in an action plan. The project group were coaching the workplaces through the action phase, including e.g. support to managers in the systematic work environment management, changing working routines and equipment, improving work ergonomics, and improving communication and information with digital aids. Preliminary results indicate that this approach can help to create involvement and motivation and to provide valuable insights on how to improve health and safety. The project was funded by the Swedish-Norwegian Foundation for Equine Research.

  • 8.
    Sandsund, Mariann
    et al.
    SINTEF Digital, Norway.
    Aamodt, Edvard
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Säkerhet och transport, Brand och Säkerhet.
    Renberg, Julie
    SINTEF Digital, Norway.
    Heat stress during and after a single simulated smoke dive in professional firefighters2023Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Firefighters are exposed to significant levels of heat stress during duty, and therefore fire-fighting exercises in hot environments must be regularly performed [1]. This study aimed to investigate the effect of extreme heat exposure on physiological responses during and after one simulated smoke dive.

    Methods: Nineteen professional male firefighters (43 ± 8 years, 84 ± 7 kg) wearing protective clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus with a total weight of 108 ± 7 kg participated. They performed a 15-min simulated smoke dive in a two-floor heat chamber (HEAT) at ambient temperatures ranging from 110 °C to 272 °C, followed by 5-min up and down stair walking outside the heat chamber. Heart rate (HR), gastrointestinal temperature (Tgi) and skin temperatures (Tsk) were registered continuously during the test.

    Results: Tgi increased significantly from start (37.5 ± 0.3 °C) to the peak of HEAT (38.4 ± 0.4 °C) and continued to increase after the heat exposure and stair walking (39.6 ± 0.5 °C). The HR also increased significantly from start (92 ± 14 bpm) to the peak of HEAT (185 ± 13 bpm) and further increased after the heat exposure and stair walking to a maximum of 190 ± 13 bpm.

    Conclusion: A 20-min firefighter smoke dive in hot environments induced high physiological strain on the firefighters, and Tgi and HR continued to increase after the heat exposure. This must be considered during live fire events when repeated smoke dives are required.

  • 9.
    Stålfelt, Frans
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson Malchau, Karin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björn, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Material och produktion, Metodik för produktframtagning.
    Mohaddes, Maziar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erichsen Andersson, Annette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Can particle counting replace conventional surveillance for airborne bacterial contamination assessments?: A systematic review using narrative synthesis2023Ingår i: American Journal of Infection Control, ISSN 0196-6553, E-ISSN 1527-3296, Vol. 51, nr 12, s. 1417-Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bacterial airborne contamination in the operating room during surgery indicates an increased risk for surgical site infection. The conventional surveillance method for bacteria in the air is by air sampling, plating, and counting of colony-forming units (CFU). Particle counting measures particles in the air, typically in sizes of 1-20 µm, and has been suggested as an alternative to CFU measurements. The primary aim was to investigate the correlation between the number of airborne CFU and particles during surgery. The secondary aim was to explore whether different ventilation settings influence the correlation between CFU and particles. Methods: The databases Cochrane, Embase, and Medline were searched for relevant publications. Due to the heterogeneity of the data, meta-analysis was not possible and a narrative analysis was performed instead. Results: The review included 11 studies. Two of the studies (n = 2) reported strong correlation between particles and CFU (Rp = 0.76 and Rc = 0.74). The remaining studies observed moderate correlation (n = 3), low correlation (n = 3), or no correlation (n = 3). Based on the primary results from this study, ventilation attribution to distinguish the correlation between particles and CFU had no or little contribution. Conclusions: Due to the lack of convincing evidence of correlation and lack of high-quality studies performing measurements in a standardized way, the studies could not provide the necessary evidence that show that particle counting could be used as a substitution for conventional air bacterial assessment. Further studies are warranted to strengthen the conclusion. © 2023 The Authors

  • 10.
    Wierzbicka, Aneta
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Omelekhina, Yuliya
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Thoustrup Saber, Anne
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Bloom, Erica
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Samhällsbyggnad, Bygg och fastighet.
    Gren, Louise
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sös Poulsen, Sarah
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Strandberg, Bo
    Lund University, Sweden; Region Skåne, Sweden.
    Pagels, Joakim
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Raun Jacobsen, Nicklas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Indoor PM2.5 from occupied residences in Sweden caused higher inflammation in mice compared to outdoor PM2.52022Ingår i: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 32, nr 12, artikel-id e13177Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We spend most of our time indoors; however, little is known about the effects of exposure to aerosol particles indoors. We aimed to determine differences in relative toxicity and physicochemical properties of PM2.5 collected simultaneously indoors (PM2.5 INDOOR) and outdoors (PM2.5 OUTDOOR) in 15 occupied homes in southern Sweden. Collected particles were extracted from filters, pooled (indoor and outdoor separately), and characterized for chemical composition and endotoxins before being tested for toxicity in mice via intratracheal instillation. Various endpoints including lung inflammation, genotoxicity, and acute-phase response in lung and liver were assessed 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. Chemical composition of particles used in toxicological assessment was compared to particles analyzed without extraction. Time-resolved particle mass and number concentrations were monitored. PM2.5 INDOOR showed higher relative concentrations (μg mg−1) of metals, PAHs, and endotoxins compared to PM2.5 OUTDOOR. These differences may be linked to PM2.5 INDOOR causing significantly higher lung inflammation and lung acute-phase response 1 day post-exposure compared to PM2.5 OUTDOOR and vehicle controls, respectively. None of the tested materials caused genotoxicity. PM2.5 INDOOR displayed higher relative toxicity than PM2.5 OUTDOOR under the studied conditions, that is, wintertime with reduced air exchange rates, high influence of indoor sources, and relatively low outdoor concentrations of PM. Reducing PM2.5 INDOOR exposure requires reduction of both infiltration from outdoors and indoor-generated particles. © 2022 The Authors. 

  • 11.
    Åkesson, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Swede.
    Donat-Vargas, Carolina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; ISGlobal, Spain; Center for Networked Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Spain.
    Hallström, Elinor
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Sonesson, Ulf
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioekonomi och hälsa, Jordbruk och livsmedel.
    Widenfalk, Anneli
    Swedish Food Agency, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Associations between dietary pesticide residue mixture exposure and mortality in a population-based prospective cohort of men and women2023Ingår i: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 182, artikel-id 108346Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a concern that pesticide residues, regularly detected in foods, might pose a health risk to the consumer, but epidemiological evidence is limited. We assessed the associations between dietary exposure to a mixture of pesticide residues and mortality. Methods: Food consumption was assessed in 68,844 participants from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, 45–83 years at baseline (1997). Concentrations of pesticide residues detected in foods on the Swedish market (1996–1998), mainly fruits and vegetables, were obtained via monitoring programs. To assess mixture effects, we summed per food item the ratios of each single pesticide mean residue concentration divided by its acceptable daily intake to create for each participant a Dietary Pesticide Hazard Index (adjusted for energy intake and expressed per kilogram of body weight). Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 %CI). Results: During 15 years of follow-up (1998–2014), a total of 16,527 deaths occurred, of which 6,238 were caused by cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 5,364 by cancer. Comparing extreme quintiles of Dietary Pesticide Hazard Index, the highest category was inversely associated with CVD mortality HR, 0.82 (95 % CI, 0.75–0.90) and with cancer mortality HR 0.82 (95 % CI 0.75–0.91). In analyses stratified by high/low Dietary Pesticide Hazard Index, similar inverse associations were observed by increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Conclusions: We observed no indications that dietary exposure to pesticide residue mixtures was associated with increased mortality, nor any clear indications that the benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption on mortality was compromised. Yet, our results need to be interpreted with caution. © 2023 The Author(s)

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