Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Burkhardt, Felix
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Harlass, Markus
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Vach, Kirstin
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Spies, Benedikt
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Kohal, Ralf-Joachim
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    A novel zirconia-based composite presents an aging resistant material for narrow-diameter ceramic implants2021In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 14, no 9, article id 2151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel ceria-stabilized zirconia-alumina-aluminate composite (Ce-TZP-comp) that is not prone to aging presents a potential alternative to yttrium-stabilized zirconia for ceramic oral implants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term stability of a one-piece narrow-diameter implant made of Ce-TZP-comp. Implant prototypes with a narrow (3.4 mm) and regular (4.0 mm) diameter were embedded according to ISO 14801, and subgroups (n = 8) were subsequently exposed to dynamic loading (107 cycles, 98N) and/or hydrothermal treatment (aging, 85◦C). Loading/aging was only applied as a combined protocol for the 4.0 mm diameter implants. One subgroup of each diameter remained untreated. One sample was cross-sectioned from each subgroup and evaluated with a scanning electron microscope for phase-transformation of the lattice. Finally, the remaining samples were loaded to fracture. A multivariate linear regression model was applied for statistical analyses (significance at p < 0.05). All samples withstood the different loading/aging protocols and no transformation propagation was observed. The narrow diameter implants showed the lowest fracture load after combined loading/aging (628 ± 56 N; p < 0.01), whereas all other subgroups exhibited no significantly reduced fracture resistance (between 762 ± 62 and 806 ± 73 N; p < 0.05). Therefore, fracture load values of Ce-TZP-comp implants suggest a reliable intraoral clinical application in the anterior jaw regions. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 2.
    Burkhardt, Felix
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany; Lennart Riemer Zahnarztpraxis Franzem, Germany.
    Spies, Benedikt
    University of Freiburg, Germany; Lennart Riemer Zahnarztpraxis Franzem, Germany.
    Riemer, Lennart
    University of Freiburg, Germany; Lennart Riemer Zahnarztpraxis Franzem, Germany.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Doerken, Sam
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Kohal, Ralf J.
    University of Freiburg, Germany; Lennart Riemer Zahnarztpraxis Franzem, Germany.
    Fracture resistance and crystal phase transformation of a one- and a two-piece zirconia implant with and without simultaneous loading and aging—An in vitro study2021In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1288-1298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of artificial aging on the transformation propagation and fracture resistance of zirconia implants. Methods: One-piece (with integrated implant abutment, 1P; regular diameter [4.1mm]; n = 16) and two-piece (with separate implant abutment, 2P; wide diameter [5 mm]; n = 16) zirconia implants were embedded according to ISO 14801. A two-piece titanium–zirconium implant (Ti-Zr; 4.1 mm diameter) served as a control (n = 16). One subgroup (n = 8) of each system was simultaneously dynamically loaded (107 cycles; 98N) and hydrothermally aged (85°C, 58 days), while the other subgroup (n = 8) remained untreated. Finally, specimens were statically loaded to fracture. Potential crystal phase transformation was examined at cross sections using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A multivariate linear regression model was applied for statistical analyses. Results: The fracture resistance of 1P (1,117 [SD = 38] N; loaded/aged: 1,009 [60] N), 2P (850 [36] N; loaded/aged: 799 [84] N), and Ti-Zr implants (1,338 [205] N; loaded/aged: 1,319 [247] N) was not affected significantly by loading/aging (p =.171). However, when comparing the systems, they revealed significant differences independent of loading/aging (p ≤.001). Regarding the crystal structure, a transformation zone was observed in SEM images of 1P only after aging, while 2P showed a transformation zone even before aging. After hydrothermal treatment, an increase of this monoclinic layer was observed in both systems. Conclusions: The Ti-Zr control implant showed higher fracture resistance compared to both zirconia implants. Loading/aging had no significant impact on the fracture resistance of both zirconia implants. The wide-body 2P zirconia implant was weaker than the regular body 1P implant. © 2021 The Authors. 

  • 3.
    Hidaka, R.
    et al.
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Masuda, Y.
    Matsumoto Dental University, Japan.
    Ogawa, K.
    Food Care Co Ltd, Japan.
    Tanaka, T.
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Kanazawa, M.
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Suzuki, K.
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers university of Technology, Sweden.
    Iijima, K.
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Matsuo, K.
    Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
    Impact of the Comprehensive Awareness Modification of Mouth, Chewing and Meal (CAMCAM) Program on the Attitude and Behavior Towards Oral Health and Eating Habits as Well as the Condition of Oral Frailty: A Pilot Study2023In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 340-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Preserving sufficient oral function and maintaining adequate nutrition are essential for preventing physical frailty and the following long-term care. We recently developed the 6-month Comprehensive Awareness Modification of Mouth, Chewing And Meal (CAMCAM) program, in which participants gather monthly to learn about oral health and nutrition while eating a textured lunch together. This study examined whether the CAMCAM program could improve attitude and behavior towards oral health, mastication, and diet as well as ameliorate oral frailty in community-dwelling older adults. Design: Single-arm pre-post comparison study. Setting and Participants: A total of 271 community-dwelling adults (72.3 ± 5.7 years of age; 159 women [58.7%]) in 4 Japanese municipalities were recruited, of which 249 participants (92%) were assessed at the final evaluation. Intervention: Participants gathered once a month at community centers to learn about oral health and nutrition while eating a “munchy” textured lunch containing proper nutrition. Measurements: Oral frailty, frailty, and eating behavior were evaluated with the Oral Frailty Index-8 (OFI-8), Kihon checklist (KCL), and CAMCAM checklist, respectively. Participants were divided into Oral frailty (OF) and Robust groups according to OFI-8 scores. The differences in KCL and CAMCAM checklist results between the OF and Robust groups were statistically tested along with changes in scores after the program. Results: KCL and CAMCAM checklist scores were significantly lower in the OF group at the initial assessment. OFI-8 and KCL findings were significantly improved in the OF group after completing the program (all P <0.05). Regarding the CAMCAM checklist, awareness of chewing improved significantly in the Robust group (P=0.009), with a similar tendency in the OF group (P=0.080). Conclusion: The findings of this pilot study suggest that the CAMCAM program may improve both oral and systemic frailty in addition to attitudes towards chewing, oral health, and meals, especially in individuals with oral frailty. The CAMCAM program merits expansion as a community-based frailty prevention program. 

  • 4.
    Jerdhaf, Oskar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Santini, Marina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Digital Systems, Prototyping Society.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Focused Terminology Extraction for CPSs The Case of "Implant Terms" in Electronic Medical Records2021In: 2021 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops (ICC Workshops), 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language Technology is an essential component of many Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) because specialized linguistic knowledge is indispensable to prevent fatal errors. We present the case of automatic identification of implant terms. The need of an automatic identification of implant terms spurs from safety reasons because patients who have an implant may or may be not submitted to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Normally, MRI scans are safe. However, in some cases an MRI scan may not be recommended. It is important to know if a patient has an implant, because MRI scanning is incompatible with some implants. At present, the process of ascertain whether a patient could be at risk is lengthy, manual, and based on the specialized knowledge of medical staff. We argue that this process can be sped up, streamlined and become safer by sieving through patients’ medical records. In this paper, we explore how to discover implant terms in electronic medical records (EMRs) written in Swedish with an unsupervised approach. To this aim we use BERT, a state-of-the-art deep learning algorithm based on pre-trained word embeddings. We observe that BERT discovers a solid proportion of terms that are indicative of implants.

  • 5.
    Karazisis, Dimitrios
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ballo, Ahmed M.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Petronis, Sarunas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Medicinteknik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Agheli, Hossein
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Emanuelsson, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thomsen, Peter
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Omar, Omar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The role of well-defined nanotopography of titanium implants on osseointegration: Cellular and molecular events in vivo2016In: International Journal of Nanomedicine, ISSN 1176-9114, E-ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 11, p. 1367-1382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Mechanisms governing the cellular interactions with well-defined nanotopography are not well described in vivo. This is partly due to the difficulty in isolating a particular effect of nanotopography from other surface properties. This study employed colloidal lithography for nanofabrication on titanium implants in combination with an in vivo sampling procedure and different analytical techniques. The aim was to elucidate the effect of well-defined nanotopography on the molecular, cellular, and structural events of osseointegration. Materials and methods: Titanium implants were nanopatterned (Nano) with semispherical protrusions using colloidal lithography. Implants, with and without nanotopography, were implanted in rat tibia and retrieved after 3, 6, and 28 days. Retrieved implants were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, histology, immunohistochemistry, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Surface characterization showed that the nanotopography was well defined in terms of shape (semispherical), size (79±6 nm), and distribution (31±2 particles/μm2). EDS showed similar levels of titanium, oxygen, and carbon for test and control implants, confirming similar chemistry. The molecular analysis of the retrieved implants revealed that the expression levels of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and the osteoclastic marker, CatK, were reduced in cells adherent to the Nano implants. This was consistent with the observation of less CD163-positive macrophages in the tissue surrounding the Nano implant. Furthermore, periostin immunostaining was frequently detected around the Nano implant, indicating higher osteogenic activity. This was supported by the EDS analysis of the retrieved implants showing higher content of calcium and phosphate on the Nano implants. Conclusion: The results show that Nano implants elicit less periimplant macrophage infiltration and downregulate the early expression of inflammatory (TNF-α) and osteoclastic (CatK) genes. Immunostaining and elemental analyses show higher osteogenic activity at the Nano implant. It is concluded that an implant with the present range of well-defined nanocues attenuates the inflammatory response while enhancing mineralization during osseointegration.

  • 6.
    Kohal, R-J
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    von Schierholz, C
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Nold, J
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Spies, BC
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Manufacturing Processes.
    Vach, K
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Burkhardt, F
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Influence of loading and aging on the fracture strength of an injection-molded two-piece zirconia implant restored with a zirconia abutment2023In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 105-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the fracture strength and potential phase transformation of an injection-molded two-piece zirconia implant restored with a zirconia abutment after loading and/or aging. Methods: Thirty-two two-piece zirconia implants (4.0 mm diameter) restored with zirconia abutments were embedded according to ISO 14801 and divided into four groups (n = 8/group): Three groups were either exclusively hydrothermally treated (group HT; 85°C), dynamically loaded (group DL; 107 cycles; 98 N), or subjected to both treatments simultaneously (group DL/HT). One group remained untreated (group 0). A sample from each group was cross-sectioned and examined by scanning electron microscopy for possible crystal phase transformation. The remaining samples were then loaded to fracture in a static loading test. A one-way ANOVA was used for statistical analyses. Results: During dynamic loading, three implants of group DL and six implants of group DL/HT fractured at a load of 98 N. The fracture strength of group DL/HT (108 ± 141 Ncm) was significantly reduced compared to the other groups (group 0: 342 ± 36 Ncm; HT: 363 ± 49 Ncm; DL: 264 ± 198 Ncm) (p &lt;.05). Fractures from group 0 and HT occurred at both implant and abutment level, whereas implants from group DL and DL/HT fractured only at implant level. A shallow monoclinic transformation zone of approximately 2 μm was observed following hydrothermal treatment. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that dynamic loading and the combination of loading and aging reduced the fracture strength of the implant abutment combination. Hydrothermal treatment caused a shallow transformation zone which had no influence on the fracture strength. © 2022 The Authors. 

  • 7.
    Rabel, Kerstin
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Kohal, Ralf Joachim
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Steinberg, Thorsten
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Rolauffs, Bernd
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Product Realisation Methodology.
    Altmann, Brigitte
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Human osteoblast and fibroblast response to oral implant biomaterials functionalized with non-thermal oxygen plasma2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 17302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasma-treatment of oral implant biomaterials prior to clinical insertion is envisaged as a potential surface modification method for enhanced implant healing. To investigate a putative effect of plasma-functionalized implant biomaterials on oral tissue cells, this investigation examined the response of alveolar bone osteoblasts and gingival fibroblasts to clinically established zirconia- and titanium-based implant surfaces for bone and soft tissue integration. The biomaterials were either functionalized with oxygen-plasma in a plasma-cleaner or left untreated as controls, and were characterized in terms of topography and wettability. For the biological evaluation, the cell adhesion, morphogenesis, metabolic activity and proliferation were examined, since these parameters are closely interconnected during cell-biomaterial interaction. The results revealed that plasma-functionalization increased implant surface wettability. The magnitude of this effect thereby depended on surface topography parameters and initial wettability of the biomaterials. Concerning the cell response, plasma-functionalization of smooth surfaces affected initial fibroblast morphogenesis, whereas osteoblast morphology on rough surfaces was mainly influenced by topography. The plasma- and topography-induced differential cell morphologies were however not strong enough to trigger a change in proliferation behaviour. Hence, the results indicate that oxygen plasma-functionalization represents a possible cytocompatible implant surface modification method which can be applied for tailoring implant surface wettability. © 2021, The Author(s).

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf