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  • 1.
    Aarstad, Olav
    et al.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Heggset, Ellinor B
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, PFI.
    Pedersen, Ina Sander
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Björnöy, Sindre H.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, PFI.
    Strand, Berit L.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Mechanical properties of composite hydrogels of alginate and cellulose nanofibrils2017In: Polymers, ISSN 2073-4360, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 9, no 8, article id 378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alginate and cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) are attractive materials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. CNF gels are generally weaker and more brittle than alginate gels, while alginate gels are elastic and have high rupture strength. Alginate properties depend on their guluronan and mannuronan content and their sequence pattern and molecular weight. Likewise, CNF exists in various qualities with properties depending on, e.g., morphology and charge density. In this study combinations of three types of alginate with different composition and two types of CNF with different charge and degree of fibrillation have been studied. Assessments of the composite gels revealed that attractive properties like high rupture strength, high compressibility, high gel rigidity at small deformations (Young’s modulus), and low syneresis was obtained compared to the pure gels. The effects varied with relative amounts of CNF and alginate, alginate type, and CNF quality. The largest effects were obtained by combining oxidized CNF with the alginates. Hence, by combining the two biopolymers in composite gels, it is possible to tune the rupture strength, Young’s modulus, syneresis, as well as stability in physiological saline solution, which are all important properties for the use as scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  • 2. Acciaro, R.
    et al.
    Aulin, C.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wågberg, L.
    Lindström, T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Claesson, P.M.
    Varga, I.
    Investigation of the formation structure and release characteristics of self-assembled composite films of cellulose nanofibrils and temperature responsive microgels2011In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, no 4, p. 1369-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Alexandrescu, L.
    et al.
    Syverud, K.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Belosi, F.
    Nanofibers against nanoparticles:: Cellulosic nanoparticles for nanoparticle aerosol filtration2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Alexandrescu, L.
    et al.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Iotti, M.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Gregersen, Ø.
    Belosi, F.
    Gatti, A.M.
    Air filtration of nano-particles using cellulose nanofibrils2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Alexandrescu, L.
    et al.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Gatti, A.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Cytotoxicity tests of cellulose nanofibril-based structures2013In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ankerfors, M.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindstrom, T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Soderberg, D.
    RISE, Innventia.
    The use of microfibrillated cellulose in high filler fine papers2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Aulin, Christian
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    Nanocellulose research and developments at Innventia2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    Energy efficient manufacture of microfibrillated cellulose by attachment of carboxymethyl cellulose2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9. Ansari, F.
    et al.
    Lindh, Erik L.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Furo, I.
    Johansson, M. K. G.
    Berglund, L. A.
    Interface tailoring through covalent hydroxyl-epoxy bonds improves hygromechanical stability in nanocellulose materials2016In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 134, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wide-spread use of cellulose nanofibril (CNF) biocomposites and nanomaterials is limited by CNF moisture sensitivity due to surface hydration. We report on a versatile and scalable interface tailoring route for CNF to address this, based on technically important epoxide chemistry. Bulk impregnation of epoxide-amine containing liquids is used to show that CNF hydroxyls can react with epoxides at high rates and high degree of conversion to form covalent bonds. Reactions take place inside nanostructured CNF networks under benign conditions, and are verified by solid state NMR. Epoxide modified CNF nanopaper shows significantly improved mechanical properties under moist and wet conditions. High resolution microscopy is used in fractography studies to relate the property differences to structural change. The cellulose-epoxide interface tailoring concept is versatile in that the functionality of molecules with epoxide end-groups can be varied over a wide range. Furthermore, epoxide reactions with nanocellulose can be readily implemented for processing of moisture-stable, tailored interface biocomposites in the form of coatings, adhesives and molded composites.

  • 10. Ansari, F.
    et al.
    Sjöstedt, A.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berglund, L. A.
    Wågberg, L.
    Hierarchical wood cellulose fiber/epoxy biocomposites: Materials design of fiber porosity and nanostructure2015In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 74, p. 60-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Delignified chemical wood pulp fibers can be designed to have a controlled structure of cellulose fibril aggregates to serve as porous templates in biocomposites with unique properties. The potential of these fibers as reinforcement for an epoxy matrix (EP) was investigated in this work. Networks of porous wood fibers were impregnated with monomeric epoxy and cured. Microscopy images from ultramicrotomed cross sections and tensile fractured surfaces were used to study the distribution of matrix inside and around the fibers - at two different length scales. Mechanical characterization at different relative humidity showed much improved mechanical properties of biocomposites based on epoxy-impregnated fibers and they were rather insensitive to surrounding humidity. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of cellulose-fiber biocomposites were compared with those of cellulose-nanofibril (CNF) composites; strong similarities were found between the two materials. The reasons for this, some limitations and the role of specific surface area of the fiber are discussed.

  • 11. Aulin, C.
    et al.
    Johansson, E.
    Wågberg, L.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    Self-organized films from cellulose i nanofibrils using the layer-by-layer technique2010In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 872-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of forming self-organized films using only charge-stabilized dispersions of cellulose I nanofibrils with opposite charges is presented, that is, the multilayers were composed solely of anionically and cationically modified microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with a low degree of substitution. The build-up behavior and the properties of the layer-by-layer (LbL)-constructed films were studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and stagnation point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR). The adsorption behavior of cationic/anionic MFC was compared with that of polyethyleneimine (PEI)/anionic MFC. The water contents of five bilayers of cationic/anionic MFC and PEI/anionic MFC were approximately 70 and 50%, respectively. The MFC surface coverage was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, which clearly showed a more dense fibrillar structure in the five bilayer PEI/anionic MFC than in the five bilayer cationic/anionic MFC. The forces between the cellulose-based multilayers were examined using the AFM colloidal probe technique. The forces on approach were characterized by a combination of electrostatic and steric repulsion. The wet adhesive forces were very long-range and were characterized by multiple adhesive events. Surfaces covered by PEI/anionic MFC multilayers required more energy to be separated than surfaces covered by cationic/anionic MFC multilayers.

  • 12.
    Aulin, C.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Karabulut, E.
    Tran, A.
    Waisgberg, L.
    Lindström, T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Transparent nanocellulosic multilayer thin films on polylactic acid with tunable gas barrier properties2013In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, no 15, p. 7352-7359Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Aulin, C.
    et al.
    Netrval, J.
    Wågberg, L.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    Aerogels from nanofibrillated cellulose with tunable oleophobicity2010In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 3298-3305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of structured porous aerogels of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) by freeze-drying has been demonstrated. The aerogels have a high porosity, as shown by FE-SEM and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements, and a very low density (<0.03 g cm-3). The density and surface texture of the aerogels can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the NFC dispersions before freeze-drying. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of 1H,1H,2H,2H- perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (PFOTS) was used to uniformly coat the aerogel to tune their wetting properties towards non-polar liquids. An XPS analysis of the chemical composition of the PFOTS-modified aerogels demonstrated the reproducibility of the PFOTS-coating and the high atomic fluorine concentration (ca. 51%) in the surfaces. The modified aerogels formed a robust composite interface with high apparent contact angles (* ≫ 90°) for castor oil (γlv = 35.8 mN m-1) and hexadecane (γlv = 27.5 mN m-1).

  • 14.
    Aulin, C.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Salazar-Alvarez, G.
    Lindström, T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    High strength flexible and transparent nanofibrillated cellulose-nanoclay biohybrid films with tunable oxygen and water vapor permeability2012In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, no 20, p. 6622-6628Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Aulin, C.
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Ström, G.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Multilayered alkyd resin/nanocellulose coatings for use in renewable packaging solutions with a high level of moisture resistance2013In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, no 7, p. 2582-2589Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Aulin, C.
    et al.
    Varga, I.
    Claesson, P. M.
    Wågberg, L.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, STFI-Packforsk.
    Buildup of polyelectrolyte multilayers of polyethyleneimine and microfibrillated cellulose studied by in situ dual-polarization interferometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation2008In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 2509-2518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) and Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) have been used to buildup polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) on silicone oxide and silicone oxynitride surfaces at different pH values and with different electrolyte and polyelectrolyte/colloid concentrations of the components. Consecutive adsorption on these surfaces was studied by in situ dual-polarization interferometry (DPI) and quartz crystal microbalance measurements. The adsorption data obtained from both the techniques showed a steady buildup of multilayers. High pH and electrolyte concentration of the PEI solution was found to be beneficial for achieving a high adsorbed amount of PEI, and hence of MFC, during the buildup of the multilayer. On the other hand, an increase in the electrolyte concentration of the MFC dispersion was found to inhibit the adsorption of MFC onto PEL The adsorbed amount of MFC was independent of the bulk MFC concentration in the investigated concentration range (15-250 mg/L). Atomic force microscopy measurements were used to image a MFC-treated silicone oxynitride chip from DPI measurements. The surface was found to be almost fully covered by randomly oriented microfibrils after the adsorption of only one bilayer of PEI/MFC. The surface roughness expressed as the rms-roughness over 1 ÎŒm2 was calculated to be 4.6 nm (1 bilayer). The adsorbed amount of PEI and MFC and the amount of water entrapped by the individual layers in the multilayer structures were estimated by combining results from the two analytical techniques using the de Feijter formula. These results indicate a total water content of ca. 41% in the PEM.

  • 17. Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    Gällstedt, Mikael
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    Oxygen and oil barrier properties of microfibrillated cellulose films and coatings2010In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 559-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of carboxymethylated microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) films by dispersion-casting from aqueous dispersions and by surface coating on base papers is described. The oxygen permeability of MFC films were studied at different relative humidity (RH). At low RH (0%), the MFC films showed very low oxygen permeability as compared with films prepared from plasticized starch, whey protein and arabinoxylan and values in the same range as that of conventional synthetic films, e.g., ethylene vinyl alcohol. At higher RH’s, the oxygen permeability increased exponentially, presumably due to the plasticizing and swelling of the carboxymethylated nanofibers by water molecules. The effect of moisture on the barrier and mechanical properties of the films was further studied using water vapor sorption isotherms and by humidity scans in dynamic mechanical analysis. The influences of the degree of nanofibrillation/dispersion on the microstructure and optical properties of the films were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and light transmittance measurements, respectively. FE-SEM micrographs showed that the MFC films consisted of randomly assembled nanofibers with a thickness of 5-10 nm, although some larger aggregates were also formed. The use of MFC as surface coating on various base papers considerably reduced the air permeability. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (E-SEM) micrographs indicated that the MFC layer reduced sheet porosity, i.e., the dense structure formed by the nanofibers resulted in superior oil barrier properties.

  • 18.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    Ström, Göran
    RISE, Innventia.
    Nanocellulose films and coatings with tunable oxygen and water vapor permeability for use in renewable packaging solutions2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Bardet, R.
    et al.
    Reverdy, C.
    Belgacem, N.
    Leirset, Ingebjörg
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Bardet, M.
    Bras, J.
    Substitution of nanoclay in high gas barrier films of cellulose nanofibrils with cellulose nanocrystals and thermal treatment2015In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 1227-1241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to design a nanocellulose based barrier film. For this purpose, cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are used as a matrix to create an entangled nanoporous network that is filled with two different nanofillers: nanoclay (reference), i.e. the mineral montmorillonite (MMT) and the bio-based TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanocrystal (CNC-T), to produce different types of nanocelluloses and their main physical and chemical features were assessed. As expected, films based on neat CNFs exhibit good mechanical performance and excellent barrier properties at low moisture content. The introduction of 32.5 wt% of either nanofiller results in a significant improvement of barrier properties at high moisture content. Finally, thermal treatment of a dried CNF/CNC-T film results in a decrease of the oxygen permeability even at high moisture content (>70 %). This is mainly attributed to the hornification of nanocellulose. A key result of this study is that the oxygen permeability of an all-nanocellulose film in 85 % relative humidity (RH), is similar to CNF film with mineral nanoclay (MMT), i.e. 2.1 instead of 1.7 cm3 µm m−2 day−1 kPa−1, respectively.

  • 20.
    Blell, Rebecca
    et al.
    CNRS Institut Charles Sadron, France.
    Lin, Xiaofeng
    CNRS Institut Charles Sadron, France.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy. RISE, Innventia.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy. RISE, Innventia.
    Pauly, Matthias
    CNRS Institut Charles Sadron, France ; Université de Strasbourg, France.
    Felix, Olivier
    CNRS Institut Charles Sadron, France.
    Decher, Gero
    CNRS Institut Charles Sadron, France ; Université de Strasbourg, France ; nternational Center for Frontier Research in Chemistry, Franc.
    Generating in-Plane Orientational Order in Multilayer Films Prepared by Spray-Assisted Layer-by-Layer Assembly2017In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 84-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a simple yet efficient method for orienting cellulose nanofibrils in layer-by-layer assembled films through spray-assisted alignment. While spraying at 90° against a receiving surface produces films with homogeneous in-plane orientation, spraying at smaller angles causes a macroscopic directional surface flow of liquid on the receiving surface and leads to films with substantial in-plane anisotropy when nanoscale objects with anisotropic shapes are used as components. First results with cellulose nanofibrils demonstrate that such fibrils are easily aligned by grazing incidence spraying to yield optically birefringent films over large surface areas. We show that the cellulosic nanofibrils are oriented parallel to the spraying direction and that the orientational order depends for example on the distance of the receiving surface from the spray nozzle. The alignment of the nanofibrils and the in-plane anisotropy of the films were independently confirmed by atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy between crossed polarizers, and the ellipsometric determination of the apparent refractive index of the film as a function of the in-plane rotation of the sample with respect to the plane of incidence of the ellipsometer.

  • 21. Butchosa, N.
    et al.
    Brown, C.
    Larsson, P.T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berglund, L.A.
    Bulone, V.
    Zhou, Q.
    Nanocomposites of bacterial cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals: Fabrication, characterization and bacterial activity2013In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, no 12, p. 3404-3413Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Carlmark, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Modification of nanocellulose with tailored latex nanoparticles2018In: Recent advances in cellulose nanotechnology research: production, characterization and applications, Trondheim: RISE PFI , 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23. Carlsson, L.
    et al.
    Ingverud, T.
    Blomberg, H.
    Carlmark, A.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    RISE, Innventia.
    Malmström, E.
    Surface characteristics of cellulose nanoparticles grafted by surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone2015In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 1063-1074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization has been employed for the grafting of e-caprolactone from cellulose nanoparticles, made by partial hydrolysis of cellulose cotton linters. A sacrificial initiator was employed during the grafting reactions, to form free polymer in parallel to the grafting reaction. The degree of polymerization of the polymer grafts, and of the free polymer, was varied by varying the reaction time. The aim of this study was to estimate the cellulose nanoparticle degree of surface substitution at different reaction times. This was accomplished by combining measurement results from spectroscopy and chromatography. The prepared cellulose nanoparticles were shown to have 3.1 (±0.3) % of the total anhydroglucose unit content present at the cellulose nanoparticle surfaces. This effectively limits the amount of cellulose that can be targeted by the SI-ROP reactions. For a certain SIROP reaction time, it was assumed that the resulting degree of polymerization (DP) of the grafts and the DP of the free polymer were equal. Based on this assumption it was shown that the cellulose nanoparticle surface degree of substitution remained approximately constant (3–7 %) and seemingly independent of SI-ROP reaction time. We believe this work to be an important step towards a deeper understanding of the processes and properties controlling SI-ROP reactions occurring at cellulose surfaces.

  • 24. Cervin, N.T.
    et al.
    Aulin, C.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Larsson, P.T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Wågberg, L.
    Ultra porous nanocellulose aerogels as separation medium for mixtures of oil/water liquids2012In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, no 2, p. 401-410Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Advanced biomaterials based on nanofibrillated cellulose: from nanopapers to nanomedicine2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) offers a wide range of interesting opportunities and advantages, being biodegradable, renewable and thus environmentally sound. Extensive research has been performed on the effective production and application of NFC. The proposed applications extend from being a component in paper, coatings and composite materials to being applied in bio-medicine as part of wound dressings or in drug delivery systems. Some of the major advantages of NFC are the dimensions and the structural and chemical composition of nanofibrils, which lead to the formation of dense networks with optimized optical and mechanical properties. In this respect, the concept of nanopaper has been introduced. Nanopapers are strong structures, with high light transmittance and smooth surfaces. These characteristics open for novel applications, including the formation of smooth substrates for printing functionality. A recently explored example is the printing of bioactive biomacromolecules and conductive structures on tailor-made nanopapers, which could form the basis for novel biosensors. Additionally, nanobarriers are most promising in novel packaging applications where the self-assembly properties of the material facilitate the formation of dense structures with high barrier against oxygen. However, NFC alone does not seem to be sufficient for the formation of adequate nanobarriers due to the brittle and hygroscopic characteristics of the material. Novel biocomposite concepts need thus closer attention, where the strong and high barrier properties of NFC could be complemented with adequate bioplastics and additives for the formation of ductile films, suitable for conversion processes. From the biomedical point of view, NFC offers several advantages. Depending on the structural and chemical composition of the material and the cross-linking with adequate polymers and particles, micro-porous and elastic gels can be formed. Such gels can hold a considerable amount of water, thus being an excellent material for keeping a moist environment during wound healing and for facilitating the regeneration process of human tissue. Additionally, NFC gels based on oxidized nanofibrils can have pH-sensitive characteristics, a property with potential in drug delivery. With the intention of giving an extensive description of NFC and its modern applications, this presentation will be divided into three main sections; i) production and definition, ii) characterization including structural, chemical and biological aspects and iii) novel applications of NFC from nanopapers to biomedical devices.

  • 26.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Cellulose fibres, nanofibrils and microfibrils: The morphological sequence of MFC components from a plant physiology and fibre technology point of view2011In: Nanoscale Research Letters, ISSN 1931-7573, E-ISSN 1556-276X, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Optical methods for the quantification of the fibrillation degree of bleached MFC materials2013In: Micron, ISSN 0968-4328, E-ISSN 1878-4291, Vol. 48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Averianova, N.
    Gibadullin, M.
    Petrov, V.
    Leirset, Ingebjörg
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Micro-structural characterisation of homogeneous and layered MFC nano-composites2013In: Micron, ISSN 0968-4328, E-ISSN 1878-4291, Vol. 44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Averianova, N
    Kazan National Research Technological University, Karl Marks 68, 420015 Kazan, Russia.
    Kondalenko, O
    Kazan National Research Technological University, Karl Marks 68, 420015 Kazan, Russia.
    Garaeva, M
    Kazan National Research Technological University, Karl Marks 68, 420015 Kazan, Russia.
    Petrov, V
    Kazan National Research Technological University, Karl Marks 68, 420015 Kazan, Russia.
    The effect of residual fibres on the micro-topography of cellulose nanopaper2014In: Micron, ISSN 0968-4328, E-ISSN 1878-4291, Vol. 56, p. 80-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Brodin, Malin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Karlsen, Trond
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Wood pulp fibres and nanocellulose: Characterization and application in biocomposite materials2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A composite can be defined as a material composed of two or more components having distinct morphology and chemistry, and giving synergetic effects. In this paper the term biocomposite is used, referring to i) a material having at least one bio-component (e.g. wood pulp fibres and nanofibrils) or ii) biomaterials intended for biomedical applications. The utilization of wood pulp fibres in composite materials has gained major interest during the last years. There are various wood pulp fibres that can be used as reinforcement in composites, e.g. thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP), chemi-thermo-mechanical pulp (CTMP) and kraft pulp fibres. Depending on the pulping process (TMP, CTMP or kraft pulp), the pulp fibres differ greatly with respect to the fibre morphology and chemistry. Kraft pulp fibres have been one of the most used raw materials for producing nanocellulose. Nanocellulose from wood refers to various cellulose nano-materials such as cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibrillated cellulose. Nanofibrillated cellulose is composed of a major fraction of structurally homogeneous nanofibrils having typical widths in the nanometre scale and lengths in the micrometre scale. Wood pulp fibres and nanofibrils have been proposed as reinforcement in composite materials. Some of the major motivations have been the potential improvements by using fibres and nanofibrillated materials with respect to e.g. strength, biodegradability and functionality. The purpose of the present work is to review some advances in biocomposite research and development, including three focus areas; structured biocomposites, flexible biocomposites and biomaterials.

  • 31.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Kirsebom, H.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Designing nanocellulose qualities for wound dressings2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Kuznetsova, N.
    Garaeva, M.
    Leirset, Ingebjörg
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Galiullina, G.
    Bleached and unbleached MFC nanobarriers:: Properties and hydrophobisation with hexamethyldisilazane2012In: Journal of nanoparticle research, ISSN 1388-0764, E-ISSN 1572-896X, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Miettinen, A
    Hendriks, C.L.L
    Gamstedt, K
    Kataka, M
    Structural characterisation of kraft pulp fibres and their nanofibrillated materials for biodegradable composite applications2011In: Nanocomposites and Polymers with Analytical Methods, InTech , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Powell, L.C
    Tissue Engineering and Reparative Dentistry, Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Cardiff, UK; Centre for NanoHealth, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK..
    Khan, S
    Tissue Engineering and Reparative Dentistry, Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Cardiff, UK..
    Hill, K.E
     Tissue Engineering and Reparative Dentistry, Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Cardiff, UK..
    Thomas, D.W
    Tissue Engineering and Reparative Dentistry, Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Cardiff, UK..
    Wood nanocellulose: Characterization and potential application as barrier against wound bacteria2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood nanocellulose is a novel biomaterial for wound dressing applications. Wood nanocellulose was produced from never-dried P. radiata pulp fibres. The applied pre-treatment was 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl  (TEMPO) mediated oxidation. To characterise bacterial growth, P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms were grown in Mueller Hinton broth on air-dried films. Various microscopy techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), were applied to characterise the nanocellulose material and the bacterial-nanocellulose interactions.   Multiscale assessments, including FESEM and AFM, revealed the effective fibrillation of the fibre wall structure, yielding nanofibrils with diameters less than 20 nm and lengths in the micrometre-scale. Importantly, we have demonstrated that the growth of PAO1 was inhibited in the presence of the nanocellulose suspensions when compared to the control. Additionally, SEM imaging revealed distinct clusters of PAO1 cells growing on the surfaces of nanocellulose films. This work highlights the potential usefulness of novel nanocellulose materials in wound dressings with optimized characteristics.

  • 35.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Powell, L.C
    Tissue Engineering and Restorative Dentistry, Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Cardiff, UK.; Centre for NanoHealth, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK..
    Nordli, H.R
    Institute of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway..
    Khan, S
     Tissue Engineering and Restorative Dentistry, Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Cardiff, UK..
    Hill, K.E
     Tissue Engineering and Restorative Dentistry, Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Cardiff, UK..
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Thomas, D.W
     Tissue Engineering and Restorative Dentistry, Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Cardiff, UK..
    Nanocellulose from wood as a biomaterial for biomedical applications2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades major efforts have been made to produce nanocellulose from wood, where the cellulose fibres are disintegrated into individualized nanofibrils with diameters < 20 nm and lengths in the micrometre scale. Production procedures include various pre-treatments, which yield nanocelluloses with varying chemical and structural properties. One important area of research is nanocellulose as a biomaterial with potential applications within the health sector. As an example, the superior mechanical properties, good moisture retention capability and the ability to form elastic macro-porous structures are advantageous properties for utilizing nanocellulose substrates for wound dressings. However, the utilization of nanocellulose as a substrate for wound dressings requires a thorough assessment of the biocompatibility of the material.  In this respect, it has been demonstrated in-vitro that nanocellulose does not exert acute toxic phenomena on fibroblast cells. However, in addition to in-vitro cytotoxicity testing, in-vivo testing of nanocellulose and the ability of nanocellulose to resist bacterial colonization need a closer attention. This presentation will give an overview of the current research on nanocellulose as a biomaterial for wound dressing applications, considering the morphology of nanocellulose structures, mechanical properties, moisture absorption, cytotoxicity tests and nanocellulose-bacteria interactions.

  • 36.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Cellulose nanofibrils: production, characterization and applications2011In: Fine Structure of Papermaking Fibres, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences , 2011, , p. 13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    On the porosity and oxygen barrier properties of cellulose nanofibril-based films2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    On the structure and oxygen transmission rate of biodegradable cellulose nanobarriers2012In: Nanoscale Research Letters, ISSN 1931-7573, E-ISSN 1556-276X, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Pretreatment-dependent surface chemistry of wood nanocellulose for pH-sensitive hydrogels2014In: Journal of biomaterials applications, ISSN 0885-3282, E-ISSN 1530-8022, Vol. 3, no 29, p. 423-432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Tobjörk, D.
    Österbacka, R.
    Inkjet-printed silver nanoparticles on nano-engineered cellulose films for electrically conducting structures and organic transistors:: concept and challenges2012In: Journal of nanoparticle research, ISSN 1388-0764, E-ISSN 1572-896X, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Yu, Y.
    Diserud, O.
    Quantitative Electron Microscopy of Cellulose Nanofibril Structures from Eucalyptus and Pinus Radiata Kraft Pulp Fibres2011In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115, Vol. 17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Chniga-Carrasco, Gary
    et al.
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Miettinen, Arttu
    Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.
    Gamstedt, Kristofer E.
    Kataja, Markku
    Structural characterisation of kraft pulp fibres and their nanofibrillated materials for biodegradable composite applications2011In: Nanocomposites and polymers with analytical methods / [ed] Cuppoletti John, InTech, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43. Cho, S.-W.
    et al.
    Gällstedt, M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Johansson, E.
    Hedenqvist, M.S.
    Injection-molded nanocomposites and materials based on wheat gluten2011In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, no 1, p. 146-152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Coseri, S.
    et al.
    Biliuta, G.
    Zemlijic, L. F.
    Stevanic Srndovic, Jasna
    RISE, Innventia.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    RISE, Innventia.
    Strnad, S.
    Kreze, T.
    Naderi, Ali
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    Erratum: One-shot carboxylation of microcrystalline cellulose in the presence of nitroxyl radicals and sodium periodate (RSC Adv. (2015) 5 (85889-85897))2015In: RSC Advances, Vol. 5, no 117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45. Coseri, S.
    et al.
    Biliuta, G.
    Zemlijic, L. F.
    Stevanic Srndovic, Jasna
    RISE, Innventia.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    RISE, Innventia.
    Strnad, S.
    Kreze, T.
    Naderi, Ali
    RISE, Innventia.
    Lindström, Tom
    RISE, Innventia.
    One-shot carboxylation of microcrystalline cellulose in the presence of nitroxyl radicals and sodium periodate2015In: RSC Advances, Vol. 5, no 104, p. 85889-85897Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Cozzolino, C.A
    et al.
    Nilsson, F.
    Iotti, M.
    Sacchi, B.
    Piga, A.
    Exploiting the nano-sized features of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) for the development of controlled-release packaging2013In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Cunha, A.G.
    et al.
    Zhou, Q.
    Larsson, P.T.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Berglund, L.A.
    Topochemical acetylation of cellulose nanopaper structures for biocomposites: Mechanisms for reduced water vapour sorption2014In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 2773-2787Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Djafari Petroudy, S.R.
    et al.
    Ghasemian, A.
    Resalati, H.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    The effect of xylan on the fibrillation efficiency of DED bleached soda bagasse pulp and on nanopaper characteristics2015In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 385-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xylan is the second most abundant polysaccharide and the most abundant hemicellulose component of soda bagasse pulp. In this study, bleached soda bagasse pulp (SB) and bleached bagasse dissolving pulp (DB) with varying amounts of xylan were fibrillated with a homogenization process. The produced fibrillated materials were used for making nanopaper structures. The surface, physical, mechanical and optical properties of the nanopaper were measured, and the effect of xylan was assessed. Laser profilometry (LP) and field emission scanning electron microscopy were applied to study the degree of the fibrillation. The pulp having the highest xylan content, SB, showed the highest yield of cellulose nanofibrils. Nanopaper produced from SB had a more consolidated structure than that produced from DB. Additionally, SB nanopaper yielded higher tensile strength, lower LP roughness, a higher barrier against oxygen and lower opacity. These results indicate a higher degree of fibrillation of the SB pulp compared to the DB pulp. Hence, the positive effect of xylan for facilitating the fibrillation of the starting pulp fibers was demonstrated.

  • 49. Djafari Petroudy, S.R.
    et al.
    Syverud, Kristin
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE, Innventia, PFI – Paper and Fiber Research Institute.
    Ghasemain, A.
    Resalati, H.
    Gregersen, Ø.W.
    Oriented nanopaper (ONP) made of bagasse nanofibrils2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Edberg, Jesper
    et al.
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Malti, Abdellah
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy.
    Hamedi, Mahiar M
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping university, Sweden.
    Electrochemical circuits from ’cut and stick’ PEDOT:PSS-nanocellulose composite2017In: Flexible and Printed Electronics, Vol. 2, no 4, article id 045010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wereport a flexible self-standing adhesive composite made from PEDOT:PSS and nanofibrillated cellulose. The material exhibits good combined mechanical and electrical characteristics (an elastic modulus of 4.4 MPa, and an electrical conductivity of 30 S cm-1). The inherent self-adhesiveness of the material enables it to be laminated and delaminated repeatedly to form and reconfigure devices and circuits. This modular property opens the door for a plethora of applications where reconfigurability and ease-of-manufacturing are of prime importance. Wealso demonstrate a paper composite with ionic conductivity and combine the two materials to construct electrochemical devices, namely transistors, capacitors and diodes with high values of transconductance, charge storage capacity and current rectification.Wehave further used these devices to construct digital circuits such as NOT, NANDandNORlogic.

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