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  • 1.
    Altmann, Brigitte
    et al.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Karygianni, Lamprini
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Al-Ahmad, Ali
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Butz, Frank
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Bächle, Maria
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Fürderer, Tobias
    Courtois, Nicolas
    Palmero, Paola
    Politecnico di Torino, Italy.
    Follo, Marie
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Chevalier, Jérôme
    Université de Lyon, France.
    Steinberg, Thorsten
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Kohal, Ralf Joachim
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Assessment of Novel Long-Lasting Ceria-Stabilized Zirconia-Based Ceramics with Different Surface Topographies as Implant Materials2017In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 27, no 40, article id 1702512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of long-lasting zirconia-based ceramics for implants, which are not prone to hydrothermal aging, is not satisfactorily solved. Therefore, this study is conceived as an overall evaluation screening of novel ceria-stabilized zirconia-alumina-aluminate composite ceramics (ZA8Sr8-Ce11) with different surface topographies for use in clinical applications. Ceria-stabilized zirconia is chosen as the matrix for the composite material, due to its lower susceptibility to aging than yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP). This assessment is carried out on three preclinical investigation levels, indicating an overall biocompatibility of ceria-stabilized zirconia-based ceramics, both in vitro and in vivo. Long-term attachment and mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition of primary osteoblasts are the most distinct on porous ZA8Sr8-Ce11p surfaces, while ECM attachment on 3Y-TZP and ZA8Sr8-Ce11 with compact surface texture is poor. In this regard, the animal study confirms the porous ZA8Sr8-Ce11p to be the most favorable material, showing the highest bone-to-implant contact values and implant stability post implantation in comparison with control groups. Moreover, the microbiological evaluation reveals no favoritism of biofilm formation on the porous ZA8Sr8-Ce11p when compared to a smooth control surface. Hence, together with the in vitro in vivo assessment analogy, the promising clinical potential of this novel ZA8Sr8-Ce11 as an implant material is demonstrated. 

  • 2.
    Carmona, Pierre
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Röding, Magnus
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Särkkä, Aila
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    von Corswant, Christian
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Olsson, Eva
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Loren, Niklas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Structure formation and coarsening kinetics of phase-separated spin-coated ethylcellulose/hydroxypropylcellulose films2022In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 18, no 16, p. 3206-3217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous phase-separated ethylcellulose/hydroxypropylcellulose (EC/HPC) films are used to control drug transport from pharmaceutical pellets. The drug transport rate is determined by the structure of the porous films that are formed as water-soluble HPC leaches out. However, a detailed understanding of the evolution of the phase-separated structure in the films is lacking. In this work, we have investigated EC/HPC films produced by spin-coating, mimicking the industrial fluidized bed spraying. The aim was to investigate film structure evolution and coarsening kinetics during solvent evaporation. The structure evolution was characterized using confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis. The effect of the EC:HPC ratio (15 to 85 wt% HPC) on the structure evolution was determined. Bicontinuous structures were found for 30 to 40 wt% HPC. The growth of the characteristic length scale followed a power law, L(t) ∼ t(n), with n ∼ 1 for bicontinuous structures, and n ∼ 0.45-0.75 for discontinuous structures. The characteristic length scale after kinetic trapping ranged between 3.0 and 6.0 μm for bicontinuous and between 0.6 and 1.6 μm for discontinuous structures. Two main coarsening mechanisms could be identified: interfacial tension-driven hydrodynamic growth for bicontinuous structures and diffusion-driven coalescence for discontinuous structures. The 2D in-plane interface curvature analysis showed that the mean curvature decreased as a function of time for bicontinuous structures, confirming that interfacial tension is driving the growth. The findings of this work provide a good understanding of the mechanisms responsible for morphology development and open for further tailoring of thin EC/HPC film structures for controlled drug release. © 2022 The Royal Society of Chemistry

  • 3.
    Dehestani, Mahdi
    et al.
    Purdue University, USA.
    Zemlyanov, Dmitry Yu
    Purdue University, USA.
    Adolfsson, Erik
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Stanciu, Lia A.
    Purdue University, USA.
    Improving bioactivity of inert bioceramics by a novel Mg-incorporated solution treatment2017In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 425, p. 564-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zirconia/alumina ceramics possess outstanding mechanical properties for dental and orthopedic applications, but due to their poor surface bioactivities they exhibit a weak bone-bonding ability. This work proposes an effective 30-min solution treatment which could successfully induce formation of bone-like apatite on the surface of 3Y-TZP and a ternary composite composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia, ceria-stabilized zirconia, and alumina (35 vol% 3Y-TZP + 35 vol% 12Ce-TZP + 30 vol% Al2O3) after 3 weeks immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). XRD was used for phase identification in the ceramic materials. The influence of solution treatment on the surface chemistry and its role on apatite formation were investigated via SEM, EDS and XPS. In vitro apatite-forming ability for the solution-treated and untreated samples of the composite and individual substrates of 3Y-TZP, 12Ce-TZP, and Al2O3 was evaluated by immersion in SBF. Apatite crystals were formed only on 3Y-TZP and composite substrates, implying that it is mainly the 3Y-TZP constituent that contributes to the bioactivity of the composite. Further, it was found from the XPS analysis that the zirconia material with higher phase stability (12Ce-TZP) produced less Zr–OH functional groups on its surface after solution treatment which accounts for its weaker bioactivity compared to 3Y-TZP. 

  • 4.
    Ghajeri, Farnaz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Leifer, Klaus
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Material and Surface Design.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    The Influence of Residuals Combining Temperature and Reaction Time on Calcium Phosphate Transformation in a Precipitation Process2022In: Journal of Functional Biomaterials, E-ISSN 2079-4983, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Precipitation is one of the most common processes to synthesize hydroxyapatite, which is the human body’s mineral forming bone and teeth, and the golden bioceramic material for bone repair. Generally, the washing step is important in the precipitation method to remove the residuals in solution and to stabilize the phase transformation. However, the influence of residuals in combination with the reaction temperature and time, on calcium phosphate formation, is not well studied. This could help us with a better understanding of the typical synthesis process. We used a fixed starting ion concentration and pH in our study and did not adjust it during the reaction. XRD, FTIR, ICP-OES, and SEM have been used to analyze the samples. The results showed that combining residuals with both reaction temperature and time can significantly influence calcium phosphate formation and transformation. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate formation and transformation are sensitive to temperature. Increasing temperature (60◦C) can inhibit the formation of acidic calcium phosphate or transform it to other phases, and further the particle size. It was also observed that high reaction temperature (60◦C) results in higher precipitation efficiency than room temperature. A low ion concentration combining reaction temperature and time could still significantly influence the calcium phosphate transformation during the drying. © 2022 by the authors. 

  • 5.
    Herzberg, Moshe
    et al.
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Berglin, Mattias
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Eliahu, Sarai
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Bodin, Lovisa
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Agrenius, Karin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Zlotkin, Amir
    DisperseBio Ltd, Israel.
    Svenson, Johan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, Chemistry, Biomaterials and Textiles.
    Efficient prevention of marine biofilm formation employing a surface-grafted repellent marine peptide2021In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 3360-3373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creation of surfaces resistant to the formation of microbial biofilms via biomimicry has been heralded as a promising strategy to protect a range of different materials ranging from boat hulls to medical devices and surgical instruments. In our current study, we describe the successful transfer of a highly effective natural marine biofilm inhibitor to the 2D surface format. A series of cyclic peptides inspired by the natural equinatoxin II protein produced by Beadlet anemone (Actinia equine) have been evaluated for their ability to inhibit the formation of a mixed marine microbial consortium on polyamide reverse osmosis membranes. In solution, the peptides are shown to effectively inhibit settlement and biofilm formation in a nontoxic manner down to 1 nM concentrations. In addition, our study also illustrates how the peptides can be applied to disperse already established biofilms. Attachment of a hydrophobic palmitic acid tail generates a peptide suited for strong noncovalent surface interactions and allows the generation of stable noncovalent coatings. These adsorbed peptides remain attached to the surface at significant shear stress and also remain active, effectively preventing the biofilm formation over 24 h. Finally, the covalent attachment of the peptides to an acrylate surface was also evaluated and the prepared coatings display a remarkable ability to prevent surface colonization at surface loadings of 55 ng/cm2 over 48 h. The ability to retain the nontoxic antibiofilm activity, documented in solution, in the covalent 2D-format is unprecedented, and this natural peptide motif displays high potential in several material application areas.

  • 6.
    Shah, Furqan A.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Centre of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Sweden.
    Stenlund, Patrik
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Medicinteknik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Centre of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Sweden.
    Martinelli, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Thomsen, Peter
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Centre of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Sweden.
    Palmquist, Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Centre of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Sweden.
    Direct communication between osteocytes and acid-etched titanium implants with a sub-micron topography2016In: Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine, ISSN 0957-4530, E-ISSN 1573-4838, Vol. 27, no 11, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The osteocyte network, through the numerous dendritic processes of osteocytes, is responsible for sensing mechanical loading and orchestrates adaptive bone remodelling by communicating with both the osteoclasts and the osteoblasts. The osteocyte network in the vicinity of implant surfaces provides insight into the bone healing process around metallic implants. Here, we investigate whether osteocytes are able to make an intimate contact with topologically modified, but micrometre smooth (Sa < 0.5 µm) implant surfaces, and if sub-micron topography alters the composition of the interfacial tissue. Screw shaped, commercially pure (cp-Ti) titanium implants with (i) machined (Sa = ~0.2 µm), and (ii) two-step acid-etched (HF/HNO3 and H2SO4/HCl; Sa = ~0.5 µm) surfaces were inserted in Sprague Dawley rat tibia and followed for 28 days. Both surfaces showed similar bone area, while the bone-implant contact was 73 % higher for the acid-etched surface. By resin cast etching, osteocytes were observed to maintain a direct intimate contact with the acid-etched surface. Although well mineralised, the interfacial tissue showed lower Ca/P and apatite-to-collagen ratios at the acid-etched surface, while mineral crystallinity and the carbonate-to-phosphate ratios were comparable for both implant surfaces. The interfacial tissue composition may therefore vary with changes in implant surface topography, independently of the amount of bone formed. Implant surfaces that influence bone to have higher amounts of organic matrix without affecting the crystallinity or the carbonate content of the mineral phase presumably result in a more resilient interfacial tissue, better able to resist crack development during functional loading than densely mineralised bone.

  • 7.
    Sun, Fengzhen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordli, Henriette R.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Pukstad, Brita
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway ; Trondheim University Hospital, Norway.
    Gamstedt, E. Kristofer
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, PFI.
    Mechanical characteristics of nanocellulose-PEG bionanocomposite wound dressings in wet conditions2017In: Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1751-6161, E-ISSN 1878-0180, Vol. 69, p. 377-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood nanocellulose has been proposed for wound dressing applications partly based on its capability to form translucent films with good liquid absorption capabilities. Such properties are adequate for non-healing and chronic wounds where adequate management of exudates is a requirement. In addition, the translucency will allow to follow the wound development without the necessity to remove the dressing from the wound. Understanding the mechanical properties of nanocellulose films and dressings are also most important for tailoring optimizing wound dressing structures with adequate strength, conformability, porosity and exudate management. Mechanical properties are usually assessed in standard conditions (50% relative humidity, RH), which is not relevant in a wound management situation. In this study we have assessed the mechanical properties of three nanocellulose grades varying in the degree of nanofibrillation. The effect of nanofibrillation and of polyethylene glycol (PEG) addition, on the tensile strength, elongation and elastic modulus were assessed after 24 h in water and in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The results reveal the behavior of the nanocellulose dressings after wetting and shed light into the development of mechanical properties in environments, which are relevant from a wound management point of view.

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