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  • 1.
    Goetz, W.
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Germany.
    Brinckerhoff, W. B.
    NASA, US.
    Arevalo, R.
    NASA, US.
    Freissinet, C.
    NASA, US.
    Getty, S.
    NASA, US.
    Glavin, D. P.
    NASA, US.
    Siljeström, Sandra
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Medicinteknik.
    Buch, A.
    Ecole Centrale Paris, France.
    Stalport, F.
    Ecole Centrale Paris, France.
    Grubisic, A.
    LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, France.
    Li, X.
    NASA, US.
    Pinnick, V.
    NASA, US.
    Danell, R.
    NASA, US.
    Van Amerom, F. H. W.
    LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, France; Danell Consulting, US.
    Goesmann, F.
    Mini-Mass Consulting, US.
    Steininger, H.
    Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Germany.
    Grand, N.
    Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Germany.
    Raulin, F.
    LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, France, France.
    Szopa, C.
    LATMOS, France.
    Meierhenrich, U.
    University of Nice, France.
    Brucato, J. R.
    INAF Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri, Italy; University of Bremen, Germany.
    MOMA: The challenge to search for organics and biosignatures on Mars2016In: International Journal of Astrobiology, ISSN 1473-5504, E-ISSN 1475-3006, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 239-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes strategies to search for, detect, and identify organic material on the surface and subsurface of Mars. The strategies described include those applied by landed missions in the past and those that will be applied in the future. The value and role of ESA's ExoMars rover and of her key science instrument Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) are critically assessed.

  • 2.
    Harris, Steve
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Mirata, Murat
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Broberg, Sarah
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Carlsson, Peter
    Sotenäs kommun, Sweden.
    Martin, Michael
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    A roadmap for increased uptake of industrial symbiosis in Sweden2018Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Mirata, Murat
    et al.
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Peter
    Sotenäs kommun, Sweden.
    Harris, Steve
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Martin, Michael
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Fornell, Rickard
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    Hackl, Roman
    Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Sweden.
    Källqvist, Tobias
    Hifab, Sweden.
    Dalväg, Emma
    Hifab, Sweden.
    Broberg, Sarah
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
    International and Swedish State of Play in Industrial Symbiosis: A review with proposals to scale up industrial symbiosis in Sweden2018Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Schweitzer, Mary
    et al.
    North Carolina State University, USA; North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, USA; Lund University, Sweden.
    Zheng, Wenxia
    North Carolina State University, USA.
    Moyer, Alison
    Drexel University, USA.
    Sjövall, Peter
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Lindgren, Johan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Preservation potential of keratin in deep time2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple fossil discoveries and taphonomic experiments have established the durability of keratin. The utility and specificity of antibodies to identify keratin peptides has also been established, both in extant feathers under varying treatment conditions, and in feathers from extinct organisms. Here, we show localization of feather-keratin antibodies to control and heat-treated feathers, testifying to the repeatability of initial data supporting the preservation potential of keratin. We then show new data at higher resolution that demonstrates the specific response of these antibodies to the feather matrix, we support the presence of protein in heat-treated feathers using ToF-SIMS, and we apply these methods to a fossil feather preserved in the unusual environment of sinter hot springs. We stress the importance of employing realistic conditions such as sediment burial when designing experiments intended as proxies for taphonomic processes occurring in the fossil record. Our data support the hypothesis that keratin, particularly the β-keratin that comprises feathers, has potential to preserve in fossil remains.

  • 5.
    Xi, Fengming
    et al.
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; Shenyang Jianzhu University, China.
    Davis, Steven J.
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; University of California, US.
    Ciais, Philippe
    LSCE Climate and Environment Sciences Laboratory, France.
    Crawford-Brown, Douglas
    LSCE Climate and Environment Sciences Laboratory, France.
    Guan, Dabo
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Pade, Claus
    University of East Anglia, UK.
    Shi, Tiemao
    Danish Technological Institute, Denmark.
    Syddall, Mark
    Shenyang Jianzhu University, China.
    Lv, Jie
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Ji, Lanzhu
    Shenyang Agricultural University, China.
    Bing, Longfei
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Wang, Jiaoyue
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Wei, Wei
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Yang, Keun-Hyeok
    Kyonggi University, South Korea.
    Lagerblad, Björn
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, CBI Betonginstitutet AB, Hållbara byggnadsverk.
    Galan, Isabel
    University of Aberdeen, UK.
    Andrade, Carmen
    Eduardo Torroja Institute for Costruction Sciences, Spain.
    Zhang, Ying
    Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, China.
    Liu, Zhu
    California Institute of Technology Pasadena, US; Harvard University, US.
    Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation2016In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 9, no 12, p. 880-883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO 2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process - carbonation - has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO 2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO 2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr â '1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr â '1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO 2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

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