Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Granlund, Marcus
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Polymer och fiber.
    Kärnkraftsindustrin lär mer om åldring av polymerer2016In: EnerginyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Under hösten samlade Energiforsks seminarium “Ageing of Polymers in nuclear applications – Education and workshop” över 35 personer från 5 olika länder för att lära och diskutera åldring av polymerer inom kärnkraft.

  • 2.
    Gårdebjer, Sofie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Andersson, M.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Life Science.
    Engström, J.
    AkzoNobel, Sweden.
    Restorp, P.
    AkzoNobel, Sweden.
    Persson, Michael
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; AkzoNobel, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anette
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Using Hansen solubility parameters to predict the dispersion of nano-particles in polymeric films2016In: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, E-ISSN 1759-9962, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 1756-1764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We suggest a rough and straightforward method to predict the dispersibility of modified cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) in nanocomposites using Hansen solubility parameters (HSP). The surface of CNC was modified using a novel approach where Y-shaped substituents with two different carbon chain lengths were attached to the surface. Approximate HSP values were calculated for the modified CNC, and dispersions of unmodified and modified CNC in solvents with varying HSPs were studied. The best dispersibility was observed in dichloromethane, when the CNC surface was modified with longer carbon chains. Dichloromethane has HSP similar to low-density polyethylene (LDPE). Nanocomposites with both unmodified and modified CNC were produced. The materials with modified CNC showed increased adhesion between the filler and the matrix, followed by a decreased water permeability compared to unmodified CNC, suggesting a better dispersibility of modified CNC in LDPE and confirming the usefulness of this approach.

  • 3.
    Hellström, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    de la Motte, Hanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Syrén, Marie
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
    Nordstierna, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bordes, Romain
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Enabling Textile Recycling: On/Off Dyeing2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Develop a novel family of environmental friendly dispersant for textile coloring embedded an on/off function for closed loop recycling.

  • 4.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Tyrode, Erik
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Visnevskij, Ceslav
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Makuska, Ricardas
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Claesson, Per M.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Temperature-dependent deicing properties of electrostatically anchored branched brush layers of poly(ethylene oxide)2016In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 32, no 17, p. 4194-4202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydration water of hydrophilic polymers freezes at subzero temperatures. The adsorption of such polymers will result in a hydrophilic surface layer that strongly binds water. Provided this interfacial hydration water remains liquidlike at subzero temperatures, its presence could possibly reduce ice adhesion, in particular, if the liquidlike layer is thicker than or comparable to the surface roughness. To explore this idea, a diblock copolymer, having one branched bottle-brush block of poly(ethylene oxide) and one linear cationic block, was electrostatically anchored on flat silica surfaces. The shear ice adhesion strength on such polymer-coated surfaces was investigated down to -25 °C using a homebuilt device. In addition, the temperature dependence of the ice adhesion on surfaces coated with only the cationic block, only the branched bottle-brush block, and with linear poly(ethylene oxide) was investigated. Significant ice adhesion reduction, in particular, at temperatures above -15 °C, was observed on silica surfaces coated with the electrostatically anchored diblock copolymer. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements on bulk polymer solutions demonstrate different thermal transitions of water interacting with branched and linear poly(ethylene oxide) (with hydration water melting points of about -18 and -10 °C, respectively). This difference is consistent with the low shear ice adhesion strength measured on surfaces carrying branched bottle-brush structured poly(ethylene oxide) at -10 °C, whereas no significant adhesion reduction was obtained with linear poly(ethylene oxide) at this temperature. We propose a lubrication effect of the hydration water bound to the branched bottle-brush structured poly(ethylene oxide), which, in the bulk, does not freeze until -18 °C.

  • 5.
    Jakubowicz, Ignacy
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Polymer och fiber.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    Åkesson, Dan
    Boldizar, Antal
    Yarahmadi, Nazdaneh
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi.
    Enebro, Jonas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Polymer och fiber.
    Berlin, Johanna
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi.
    Royne, Frida
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energi och Bioekonomi.
    Ericson, Mats
    Svensson, Mats
    Lindgren, Martina
    Guide för bioplaster: från tillverkning till återvinning2016Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Javed, Asif
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ullsten, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ernstsson, Marie
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Järnström, Lars
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Study of starch and starch-PVOH blends and effects of plasticizers on mechanical and barrier properties of coated paperboard2016In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 499-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of self-supporting films based on starch-plasticizer and starch-PVOH-plasticizer and the barrier properties of paperboard coated with solutions of these polymers have been studied. The plasticizers used were glycerol, polyethylene glycol and citric acid. It was shown that the addition of a plasticizer and PVOH to starch substantially increases the flexibility of starch films. It was seen that curing the self-supporting films led to a decrease in flexibility. After heat-treatment, a substantial increase in storage modulus was observed only in the starch-PVOH-citric-acid blend films. Tensile tests on the films indicate that citric acid did not cause any noticeable phase separation. Citric acid acted as a compatibilizer for starch-PVOH blends even though a similar enrichment of PVOH at the air-solid interface was observed with both citric acid and polyethylene glycol as plasticizer. The properties of barrier coatings greatly reflected the compatibility of starch-PVOH blends containing citric acid. The only plasticizer that resulted in a lower water vapour transmission rate through the starch and starch-PVOH coatings was citric acid, which suggests that cross-linking took place. With four layers, coatings based of starch-PVOH possessed the same oxygen- transmission rate with citric acid as without citric acid.

  • 7.
    Li, Dongfang
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Iversen, Tommy
    RISE, Innventia. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Hydrophobic materials based on cotton linter cellulose and an epoxy-activated polyester derived from a suberin monomer2015In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 69, no 6, p. 721-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suberin is a natural hydrophobic material that could be used to improve the water repellency of cellulose surfaces. It is also abundant in the outer bark of birch (Betula verrucosa); birch bark is a side-stream product in Scandinavia from the forest industry, which is generally burned for energy production. A suberin monomer, cis-9,10-epoxy-18-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid, was isolated from birch outer bark and polymerized via lipase (immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B). The resulting epoxy-activated polyester was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and size exclusion chromatography. Then the polyester was cured with tartaric or oxalic acid, and the crosslinked polyesters were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry. Hydrophobic materials were prepared by compression molding of polyester-impregnated cellulose sheets, and the final products were characterized by FTIR, cross-polarization magic angle spinning 13C NMR, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The water contact angle was significantly increased from 0° for the original cellulose sheets to over 100° for the produced hydrophobic materials.

  • 8.
    Li, Dongfang
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Iversen, Tommy
    RISE, Innventia. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Treatment of a cellulose fiber surface with a suberin monomer-derived polymer2015In: Polymers from Renewable Resources, ISSN 2041-2479, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 75-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biorefinery concept requires the development of value-added products, such as materials from biomass, including bark. Suberin is the most abundant component in birch (Betula verrucosa) outer bark and acts as a barrier against the penetration of water and external attacks from microorganisms. The aliphatic domain of suberin is rich in hydroxy fatty acids, such as cis-9,10-epoxy-18- hydroxyoctadecanoic acid. In this study, it was isolated from the outer bark of birch and polymerized to prepare polyepoxy acid (PEA), which was used to impregnate filter papers. After complete drying, PEA-loaded filter papers were placed under UV to crosslink the epoxides through cationic polymerization with a diaryliodonium salt as the photo-initiator. The crosslinking was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The materials obtained after UV curing showed substantially increased hydrophobicity, decreased moisture absorption, increased tensile strength, and increased ductility. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) showed that the crosslinked PEA covered the surface of the cellulose fibers and filled the interstitial spaces.

  • 9. Newson, W.R.
    et al.
    Kuktaite, R.
    Hedenqvist, M.S.
    Gällstedt, M.
    RISE, Innventia.
    Johansson, E.
    Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics2014In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 62, no 28, p. 6707-6715Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Palme, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Peterson, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    de la Motte, Hanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Theliander, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Brelid, Harald
    Södra Innovation, Sweden..
    Development of an efficient route for combined recycling of PET and cotton from mixed fabrics2017In: Textiles and Clothing Sustainability, ISSN 2197-9936, Vol. 3, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most textile waste is either incinerated or landfilled today, yet, the material could instead be recycled through chemical recycling to new high-quality textiles. A first important step is separation since chemical recycling of textiles requires pure streams. The focus of this paper is on the separation of cotton and PET (poly(ethylene terephthalate), polyester) from mixed textiles, so called polycotton. Polycotton is one of the most common materials in service textiles used in sheets and towels at hospitals and hotels. A straightforward process using 5–15 wt% NaOH in water and temperature in the range between 70 and 90 °C for the hydrolysis of PET was evaluated on the lab-scale. In the process, the PET was degraded to terephthalic acid (TPA) and ethylene glycol (EG). Three product streams were generated from the process. First is the cotton; second, the TPA; and, third, the filtrate containing EG and the process chemicals. The end products and the extent of PET degradation were characterized using light microscopy, UV-spectroscopy, and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy, as well as solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the cotton cellulose degradation was evaluated by analyzing the intrinsic viscosity of the cotton cellulose. The findings show that with the addition of a phase transfer catalyst (benzyltributylammonium chloride (BTBAC)), PET hydrolysis in 10% NaOH solution at 90 °C can be completed within 40 min. Analysis of the degraded PET with NMR spectroscopy showed that no contaminants remained in the recovered TPA, and that the filtrate mainly contained EG and BTBAC (when added). The yield of the cotton cellulose was high, up to 97%, depending on how long the samples were treated. The findings also showed that the separation can be performed without the phase transfer catalyst; however, this requires longer treatment times, which results in more cellulose degradation.

  • 11.
    Ribul, Miriam
    et al.
    University of the Arts London, UK.
    de la Motte, Hanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    The Material Affinity of Design and Science for a Circular Economy2016In: Circular Transitions Proceedings, 2016, p. 236-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a design and material science collaboration in a science laboratory for regenerated cellulose. The material affinity outlines how both disciplines are connected through a materials practice in communication and production of cellulose films. The outcome presents new transdisciplinary approaches for design and science towards circularity of materials.

  • 12.
    Röding, Magnus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Gaska, Karolina
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden .
    Kádár, Roland
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Loren, Niklas
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Computational Screening of Diffusive Transport in Nanoplatelet-Filled Composites: Use of Graphene To Enhance Polymer Barrier Properties2017In: ACS Applied Nano Materials, ISSN 2574-0970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by the substantial interest in various fillers to enhance the barrier properties of polymeric films, especially graphene derivatives, we perform a computational screening of obstructed diffusion to explore the design parameter space of nanoplatelet-filled composites synthesized in silico. As a model for the nanoplatelets, we use circular and elliptical nonoverlapping and impermeable flat disks, and diffusion is stochastically simulated using a random-walk model, from which the effective diffusivity is calculated. On the basis of ∼1000 generated structures and diffusion simulations, we systematically investigate the impact of different nanoplatelet characteristics such as orientation, layering, size, polydispersity, shape, and amount. We conclude that the orientation, size, and amount of nanoplatelets are the most important parameters and show that using nanoplatelets oriented perpendicular to the diffusion direction, under reasonable assumptions, with approximately 0.2% (w/w) graphene, we can reach 90% reduction and, with approximately 1% (w/w) graphene, we can reach 99% reduction in diffusivity, purely because of geometrical effects, in a defect-free matrix with perfect compatibility. Additionally, our results suggest that the existing analytical models have some difficulty with extremely large aspect ratio (extremely flat) nanoplatelets, which calls for further development.

  • 13.
    Shen, Zhiqiang
    et al.
    University of Connecticut, USA.
    Röding, Magnus
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience. University College London, Australia.
    Kröger, Martin
    ETH Zürich, Switzerland.
    Li, Ying
    University of Connecticut, USA .
    Carbon nanotube length governs the viscoelasticity and permeability of buckypaper2017In: Polymers, ISSN 2073-4360, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 9, no 4, article id 115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Svagan, Anna J.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Benjamins, Jan-Willem
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Life Science.
    Al-Ansari, Zeinab
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Shalom, Daniel Bar
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Müllertz, Anette
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Löbmann, Korbinian
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Solid cellulose nanofiber based foams – Towards facile design of sustained drug delivery systems2016In: Journal of Controlled Release, ISSN 0168-3659, E-ISSN 1873-4995, Vol. 244, p. 74-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Control of drug action through formulation is a vital and very challenging topic within pharmaceutical sciences. Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) are an excipient candidate in pharmaceutical formulations that could be used to easily optimize drug delivery rates. CNF has interesting physico-chemical properties that, when combined with surfactants, can be used to create very stable air bubbles and dry foams. Utilizing this inherent property, it is possible to modify the release kinetics of the model drug riboflavin in a facile way. Wet foams were prepared using cationic CNF and a pharmaceutically acceptable surfactant (lauric acid sodium salt). The drug was suspended in the wet-stable foams followed by a drying step to obtain dry foams. Flexible cellular solid materials of different thicknesses, shapes and drug loadings (up to 50 wt%) could successfully be prepared. The drug was released from the solid foams in a diffusion-controlled, sustained manner due to the presence of intact air bubbles which imparted a tortuous diffusion path. The diffusion coefficient was assessed using Franz cells and shown to be more than one order of magnitude smaller for the cellular solids compared to the bubble-free films in the wet state. By changing the dimensions of dry foams while keeping drug load and total weight constant, the drug release kinetics could be modified, e.g. a rectangular box-shaped foam of 8 mm thickness released only 59% of the drug after 24 h whereas a thinner foam sample (0.6 mm) released 78% of its drug content within 8 h. In comparison, the drug release from films (0.009 mm, with the same total mass and an outer surface area comparable to the thinner foam) was much faster, amounting to 72% of the drug within 1 h. The entrapped air bubbles in the foam also induced positive buoyancy, which is interesting from the perspective of gastroretentive drug-delivery.

  • 15.
    Tuominen, Mikko
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Material och ytteknik.
    Funktionella ytbeläggningar på trä/ Functional multilayer coatings to improve properties of wood2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Report on the Troëdsson Postdoc-project 2013‒2015.

  • 16.
    Wedin, Helena
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Niit, Ellinor
    Swedish School of Textiles, Sweden.
    Ahmad Mansoor, Zaheer
    re:newcell, Sweden.
    Kristinsdottir, Anna Runa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    de la Motte, Hanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Jönsson, Christina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Östlund, Åsa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Lindgren, Christofer
    re:newcell, Sweden.
    Investigation of recycled viscose fibres after removal of a reactive dye combination and an easy care finish agent2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile-to-textile recycling from cotton textiles can be done either mechanically or chemically. In chemical textile recycling of cotton there are challenges to overcome in order to regenerate new fibres. Two of the challenges among others are reactive dyes and wrinkle-free finishes that could disturb the regeneration process steps since these finishes are covalently linked to the cellulose.

    This poster discusses the impact of using a novel alkaline/acid bleaching sequence to strip reactive dyes and wrinkle-free finish (DMDHEU) from cotton textile for production of regenerated viscose fibre properties. The results might generate a promising step forward to overcome quality challenges for cellulosic chemical recycling.

  • 17.
    Yarahmadi, Nazdaneh
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Jakubowicz, Ignacy
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Polymer och fiber.
    Enebro, Jonas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Kemi Material och Ytor, Polymer och fiber.
    Polylactic acid and its blends with petroleum-based resins: Effects of reprocessing and recycling on properties2016In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 133, no 36, article id 43916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental and economic reasons make the use of bioplastics and biocomposites increasingly coveted in sectors other than packaging. Recycling of all wasted or rejected durable plastics is highly desired and biobased plastics are no exception. Therefore, the investigation of pre- and post-consumer recycling of products made from biobased plastics is of great interest. Polylactic acid (PLA) and its blends have been chosen for this study because it is an excellent representative of mass-produced bioplastics for industrial applications. As part of the "Sustainable Recycling of 'Green' Plastics" project, the current study addresses the durability issues related to the reprocessing and post-consumer recycling of a PLA virgin resin and two commercially available blends of PLA namely one with polycarbonate (PC) and one with polyethylene (PE). The materials were investigated using methods that simulate post-processing and post-consumer recycling. Accelerated ageing was performed at elevated temperature and humidity to simulate the usage period of the materials. The materials were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and their mechanical strength was evaluated by tensile and impact testing. The flow properties of the materials were characterized by the melt flow index (MFI). Multiple processing of pure PLA did not affect the impact strength or the glass transition temperature (Tg), but caused crystallization and increase in the MFI, indicating that degradation occurred during processing. DSC thermograms of the blends revealed that the components in the blends were not miscible. Multiple processing of the blends did not significantly affect the elastic modulus of the materials, but affected the elongation at break. The results indicated that multiple processing of the PLA/HDPE blend caused increased dispersion and thus increased elongation at break, while the dominating mechanism in the PLA/PC blend was degradation that caused a decrease in elongation at break. Post-consumer recycling of the PLA/PC blend was simulated and the results clearly showed that ageing corresponding to one year of use caused a significant degradation of PLA. Pure PLA was severely degraded after only one ageing cycle. Although the PLA/PC blend showed some improved mechanical properties and resistance to degradation compared with pure PLA, one ageing cycle still caused a severe degradation of the PLA and even the PC was degraded as indicated by the formation of small amounts of bisphenol A.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7