Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Dispersant adsorption and viscoelasticity of alumina suspensions measured by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and in situ dynamic rheology
RISE, Swerea, Swerea IVF.
Chalmers University of Technology.
2008 (English)In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 24, no 18, 9989-9996 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Adsorption behavior and water content of adsorbed layers of four dispersants for aqueous ceramic processing were studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) on alumina surfaces. The dispersants were a poly(acrylic acid), a lignosulfonate, and two hydrophilic comb copolymers with nonionic polyoxyethylene chains of different molecular weights. A Voigt model was applied to analyze the viscoelastic behavior of the adsorbed dispersant layers. The results from QCM-D were compared with viscoelastic properties determined by in situ dynamic rheology measurements of highly concentrated alumina suspensions during slip casting. The QCM-D results showed that both the poly(acrylic acid) and the lignosulfonate adsorbed in low amounts and in a flat conformation, which generated thin, highly rigid layers less than 1 nm thick. The water content of these layers was found to be around 30% for the lignosulfonate and 35% for the poly(acrylic acid). High casting rate and strength in terms of storage modulus were observed in the final consolidate of the suspensions with the two polyelectrolytes. In contrast, the high molecular weight comb copolymer adsorbed in a less elastic layer with a thickness of about 6 nm, which is enough to provide steric stabilization. The viscous behavior of this layer was attributed to high water content, which was calculated to be around 90%. Such a water-rich layer gives a lubrication effect, which allows for reorientation of particles during the consolidation process, resulting in a high final strength of the ceramic material. During consolidation, the suspension showed a slow casting rate, most likely due to rearrangement facilitated by the lubricating layer. The short-chain comb copolymer adsorbed in a 1.5 nm thick, rigid layer and gave low final strength to the consolidated suspension. It is likely that the poor consolidation behavior is caused by flocculation due to insufficient stabilization of the dispersion. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 24, no 18, 9989-9996 p.
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-13384DOI: 10.1021/la800719uScopus ID: 2-s2.0-52649158709OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-13384DiVA: diva2:973590
Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopushttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la800719u
By organisation
Swerea IVF
In the same journal
Langmuir
Materials Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 9 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.27.0