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High velocity hail impact on composite laminates - Modelling and testing
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, SICOMP.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2627-3280
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, SICOMP.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, SICOMP.
2013 (English)In: Solid Mechanics and its Applications, ISSN 9250042, Vol. 192, p. 393-426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hail impact on composite structures during flight occurs at high velocities and is a serious concern as it may cause matrix cracking, large internal delaminations, and eventually fibre fracture not visible on the impacted surface. The present paper gives an introduction to hail impact on composite laminates and an overviewof experiments andmodellingwork on this topic, performed during several years at Swerea SICOMP. Ice balls of different sizes and velocities have been shot with an air gun on composite laminates of different thickness and reinforcement architecture. High speed photography and measurement of strain and deflection histories of the laminates have been used to validate the models developed. Models involve dynamic explicit finite element (FE) simulations with cohesive elements to allow for delamination in the laminate, and simplified but fast analytical models. The experimental response has also been compared with predictions from the FE model and the analytical models using various material models of the ice. FE models using a calibrated elastic-plastic ice model are capable of accurately predicting the response and delamination initiation, while the current analytical models are unable to simulate the initial part of the impact. A main conclusion is that delamination occurs at a very early stage of the impact (first 10-50 μs) where three-dimensional wave propagation and the initial elastic-plastic behaviour of the ice are important. Closed form models are capable of predicting the peak contact stresses at the first instance of contact, but further work is required to allow simulation of the decay of contact stresses observed in the FE simulations. © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 192, p. 393-426
Keywords [en]
Composite, Hail impact, Laminates
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-13157DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-5329-7_9ISBN: 9790000000000 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-13157DiVA, id: diva2:973353
Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://rd.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-94-007-5329-7_9

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Olsson, Robin

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