Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Optical Emission – Pulse Distribution Analysis (PDA/OES) for applications to Aluminium alloys
RISE, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB.
RISE, Swerea, Swerea KIMAB.
2012 (English)Report (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The technique PDA/OES is briefly reviewed. It is based on detection of the signals from individual sparks in OES analysis, which usually comprises a few thousand sparks in each burn. Sparks hitting inclusions/particles of characteristic elemental composition give rise to “outliers” of higher intensity for “marker” elements characteristic of the particle type. The outliers are extracted by statistical analysis, and processed by the software to identify and quantify the particles. PDA/OES is used mainly in the steel industry, where the main interest is to detect and analyse non-metallic inclusions (NMI). In this work, PDA/OES has been tested for applicability to aluminium alloys. In this case the main interest is metallic particles, but there are also some types of NMI’s of interest. It was found that PDA functions in the same way as in steels, but there are several factors limiting the applicability. Firstly, the smallest detectable particles are about 1 μm diameter, and the particle number density should not exceed about 20000/mm3 for PDA to detect then as individual particles. In aluminium, many particles (precipitates) of interest are much smaller and present in much higher number densities. Secondly, the elements present in the metallic particles also exist as dissolved in the surrounding metal, giving a high and noisy background which limits the possibility to detect signals from the particles as outliers. These constraints has limited the applicability to metallic particles in the several μm range, using Fe as the “marker” element. However, for certain types of NMI it is likely that very small particles down to 1 μm can be detected. The experimental work has shown that the scanning spark technique OPA can provide additional useful analytical information. Macroscopic segregation at the mm – several cm ranges can rapidly be investigated in two dimensions. In combination with PDA, macroscopic “clusters” of particles can be mapped.The spark optical emission techniques PDA/OES and Original Position Analysis (OPA) have been investigated for application to aluminium alloys. PDA/OES has been optimised for detection and quantification of metallic particles in the several µm range with. The OPA technique has been evaluated for rapid determination of macroscopic segregation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swerea KIMAB AB , 2012.
Series
Rapport / Institutet för metallforskning, ISSN 1403-848X ; KIMAB-2012-102
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-12996OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-12996DiVA: diva2:973190
Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

By organisation
Swerea KIMAB
Materials Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 38 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.27.0