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Characterization of Clostridium spp. isolated from spoiled processed cheese products
SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
2006 (English)In: Journal of Food Protection, ISSN 0362-028X, E-ISSN 1944-9097, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 1887-1891Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Of 42 spoiled cheese spread products, 35 were Found to harbor Clostridium spp. Typical signs of spoilnge were gas production and off-odor. The identity was determined for about half of the isolates (n = 124) by Analytab Products (API), Biolog, the RiboPrinter System, 16S rDNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid analysis, or some combination of these. The majority of isolates were identified as Clostridium sporogenes (in 33% of products), but Clostridium cochlearium (in 12% of products) and Clostridium tyrobutyricum (in 2% of products) were also retrieved. Similarity analysis of the riboprint patterns for 21 isolates resulted in the identification of 10 ribogroups. A high degree of relatedness was observed between isolates of C. sporogenes originating from products produced 3 years apart, indicating a common and, over time, persistent source of infection. The spoilage potential of 11 well-characterized isolates and two culture collection strains was analyzed by inoculating shrimp cheese spread with single cultures and then storing them at 37°C. Tubes inoculated with C. tyrobutyricum did not show any visible signs of growth (e.g., coagulation, discoloration, gas formation) in the cheese spread. After 2 weeks of incubation, tubes inoculated with C. cochlearium or C. spoprogenes showed gas-holes, syneresis with separation of coagulated casein and liquid, and a change in color of the cheese. The amount of CO2 produced by C. cochlearium strains was approximately one-third that produced by the majority of C. sporogenes strains. To our knowledge, this is the first study to isolate and identify C. cochlearium as a spoilage organism in cheese spread. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 69, no 8, p. 1887-1891
Keywords [en]
Food Engineering
Keywords [sv]
Livsmedelsteknik
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-8927PubMedID: 16924914OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-8927DiVA, id: diva2:966800
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved

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