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Accounting for overfishing in life cycle assessment: New impact categories for biotic resource use
SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
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2014 (English)In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 19, no 5, 1156-1168 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Overfishing is a relevant issue to include in all life cycle assessments (LCAs) involving wild caught fish, as overfishing of fish stocks clearly targets the LCA safeguard objects of natural resources and natural ecosystems. Yet no robust method for assessing overfishing has been available. We propose lost potential yield (LPY) as a midpoint impact category to quantify overfishing, comparing the outcome of current with target fisheries management. This category primarily reflects the impact on biotic resource availability, but also serves as a proxy for ecosystem impacts within each stock. Methods: LPY represents average lost catches owing to ongoing overfishing, assessed by simplified biomass projections covering different fishing mortality scenarios. It is based on the maximum sustainable yield concept and complemented by two alternative methods, overfishing though fishing mortality (OF) and overfishedness of biomass (OB), that are less data-demanding. Results and discussion: Characterization factors are provided for 31 European commercial fish stocks in 2010, representing 74 % of European and 7 % of global landings. However, large spatial and temporal variations were observed, requiring novel approaches for the LCA practitioner. The methodology is considered compliant with the International Reference Life Cycle Data System (ILCD) standard in most relevant aspects, although harmonization through normalization and endpoint characterization is only briefly discussed. Conclusions: Seafood LCAs including any of the three approaches can be a powerful communicative tool for the food industry, seafood certification programmes, and for fisheries management. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 19, no 5, 1156-1168 p.
Keyword [en]
Food Engineering
Keyword [sv]
Livsmedelsteknik
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-8740DOI: 10.1007/s11367-013-0684-zOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-8740DiVA: diva2:966613
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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