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Species identification by genotyping and determination of antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from humans and chickens in Sweden
2004 (English)In: International Journal of Food Microbiology, ISSN 0168-1605, E-ISSN 1879-3460, Vol. 96, no 2, 173-179 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Campylobacter is today the most common cause of human bacterial enteritis in Sweden, as well as in most other industrialized countries. Common sources of infection are undercooked chicken meat, unpasteurized milk and contaminated drinking water. One aim with our present study was to identify the species Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains from humans and chickens using a polymerase chain reaction/restriction enzyme analysis (PCR/REA) method, as well as traditional hippurate hydrolysis test. Another aim was to investigate the antibiotic resistance pattern of the human domestic C. jejuni/C. coli isolates from infected patients and isolates from healthy Swedish chicken, as well as isolates from humans infected abroad. If discrimination between C. jejuni and C. coli was based on testing for hippurate hydrolysis, 95% of the human domestic strains and 88% of the chicken strains were identified as C. jejuni. Based on genotyping by PCR/REA, 100% of the human domestic strains and 98% of the chicken strains were attributed to C. jejuni. The E-test and disc diffusion methods were used for phenotypic antibiotic resistance studies. The two methods gave similar results. Most Swedish C. jejuni/C. coli isolates both from humans and chickens were sensitive to doxycycline and erythromycin, which are antibiotics used to treat human infection. Only 7% of the human domestic strains and 2% of the chicken strains were resistant to the quinolones tested. As a comparison, more than 94% of strains isolated from travelers to Asia and southern Europe showed antibiotic resistance to one or more drugs. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 96, no 2, 173-179 p.
Keyword [en]
Food Engineering
Keyword [sv]
Livsmedelsteknik
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-8714DOI: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.03.017PubMedID: 15364471OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-8714DiVA: diva2:966587
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08Bibliographically approved

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International Journal of Food Microbiology
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
Language
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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