Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Methods for artificial perception: Can machine replace man?
SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
Show others and affiliations
2006 (English)In: Developments in Food Science, ISSN 0167-4501, Vol. 43, no C, p. 617-618Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The previous 'Scandinavian' Weurman Flavour Symposium held in Oslo, Norway, in 1987 had as the main themes chemistry, biotechnology, sensory science and data analysis in flavour research [1]. Since then, many advances have been made, however, when comparing with the Weurman Symposium in 2005, the subject areas and topics of research have not changed very much. Flavour scientists still work with identification of aroma and taste components in foods, their formation, stability and release as well as sensory and data analytical aspects. The knowledge about flavour components in foods and the understanding of the way we perceive them has though considerably expanded. Advances have also been made in the way one can analyse flavours in foods and beverages, and measure responses from and in human subjects. One can say that the toolbox with methods and techniques for flavour analysis has expanded remarkably offering many new possibilities to understand flavour from different perspectives and levels of details. The workshop presented some state-of-the-art applications of modern in vivo and in vitro flavour analysis as well as visual sensory assessments of meals made by machines equipped with sensors and artificial networks processing capability. Also, new ways of studying multisensory processes by stimulating sensory subjects with defined stimuli were discussed. Intelligent 'artificial perception' systems may replace some routine sensory analysis and monotonous production tasks in the future, but the development of such systems still require sensory assessments by humans. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 43, no C, p. 617-618
Keywords [en]
Food Engineering
Keywords [sv]
Livsmedelsteknik
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-8486DOI: 10.1016/S0167-4501(06)80145-7OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-8486DiVA, id: diva2:966358
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full texthttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957821009&partnerID=40&md5=38eccf14a7d91e6346c73310a5c91716
By organisation
SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik
Food Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 12 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.8