Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Ammonia Volatilization Following Application of Livestock Manure to Arable Land
RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
1994 (English)In: Journal of Agricultural Engineering Research, ISSN 0021-8634, E-ISSN 1095-9246, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 241-260Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ammonia volatilization from land-spreading of livestock manure was investigated by using a new micrometeorological measuring method based on passive diffusion sampling close to the ground surface. The approach implies that estimates of two parameters must be made: (1) the driving force, that is, the difference between the equilibrium concentration (Ceq) and the ambient concentration (Ca,z), and (2) the surface resistance represented by a mass transfer coefficient (Kz,a). The effect of factors related to meteorology, soil/manure characteristics and mode of application on NH3 volatilization was examined in the laboratory and some of the results were validated by field experiments. Temperature influenced Ceq according to a mathematical relationship, although absolute concentration level could not be estimated on the basis of temperature, pH and ammonia content only. It was suggested that temperature and air humidity interact in the dynamics of the ammonia volatilization process, primarily by establishing changes with time by an ammonia enrichment factor. Manure fluidity, a parameter related to dry matter content, substantially influenced Ceq, as did the mode of application. By means of incorporation, volatilization rates could be reduced by as much as 83 to 98%, depending on type of manure and mode of incorporation. Differences in application rates did not influence the relative Ceq but a linear relationship was suggested between the fraction of surface area covered and the initial Ceq. Volatilization from band spreading and broadcast spreading followed different time courses in the initial stage after application but the cumulative loss difference was similar with time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1994. Vol. 58, no 4, p. 241-260
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-2512DOI: 10.1006/jaer.1994.1054Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0000062707OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-2512DiVA, id: diva2:960102
Available from: 2016-09-07 Created: 2016-09-07 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus
By organisation
JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik
In the same journal
Journal of Agricultural Engineering Research
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.3