Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Greenhouse gas emissions from pig slurry during storage and after field application in northern European conditions
RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik.
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: Biosystems Engineering, ISSN 1537-5110, E-ISSN 1537-5129, Vol. 113, no 4, 379-394 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Different mitigation techniques for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from pig slurry in storage and after field application were evaluated and specific emissions factors derived. Fluxes of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured for one year in a pilot-scale storage plant comparing uncovered pig slurry (NC) with slurry covered by straw (SC) or plastic sheet cover (PC). In spring and autumn, stored slurry was band spread (BS) in the field without or with immediate incorporation by harrowing (BS + HA). Closed chamber techniques were used for gas sampling. Complementary soil core experiments in the laboratory examined the influence of soil moisture and temperature on emissions from slurry application. Annual CH4 emissions (g CH4-C kg-1 VS) from storage were 5.3 for NC, 5.8 for SC and 2.8 for PC, corresponding to CH4 conversion factors (MCFs) of 2.6, 2.8 and 1.4%, respectively. N2O emissions from storage were low except from SC, where they comprised 31.7 g N2O-N m-2 year-1, corresponding to an N2O emissions factor (EFN2O) of 0.66% of total N (Tot-N) in slurry. N2O emissions after field application varied depending on soil conditions, with soil moisture content having a significant influence according to soil core experiments. Overall, cumulative N2O-N emissions in spring were 1.35% of Tot-N in slurry for BS and 0.46% for BS + HA. Corresponding N2O-N emissions in autumn were 0.77 and 0.97%. The MCFs observed in storage were considerably lower than the default IPCC value of 10%, while EFN2O was in the suggested IPCC range for storage and field. © 2012 IAgrE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 113, no 4, 379-394 p.
National Category
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-2416DOI: 10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2012.09.010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84869040324OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-2416DiVA: diva2:960006
Available from: 2016-09-07 Created: 2016-09-07 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus
By organisation
JTI Institutet för Jordbruks- och Miljöteknik
In the same journal
Biosystems Engineering
Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.29.0