Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
On the use of alternative fuels in rotary kiln burners - An experimental and modelling study of the effect on the radiative heat transfer conditions
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Energy Technology Center.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 138, p. 210-220, article id 4558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract In this work, the radiative heat transfer conditions in a 400 kW<inf>fuel</inf> test furnace were studied. The test furnace is a scaled pilot of a rotary kiln furnace used in iron ore pellet production. In particular, the study focuses on the choice of fuel and the subsequent effect on temperature and radiative conditions in the flame. Several co-firing flames of coal and biomass were investigated and also other fuels such as heavy fuel oil and natural gas. The test furnace was used in the experiments, and radiative intensity was measured with a narrow angle radiometer. Detailed radiation modelling was performed using spectral models for gas and particle properties. The results show that all co-firing flames give a shorter radiating flame length. Based on the radiation modelling, it was also shown that the particle radiation dominates the heat transfer from the flames. Due to the high pre-heating temperature of the combustion air (1100°C), the flame temperatures were generally very high. The flame temperature in the natural gas flame was likely around 2000°C while the coal flame temperatures were estimated to 1500-1600°C. The two coals tested, having almost identical fuel specifications, resulted in a substantial difference in the radiation intensity emitted by the flame. This emphasizes the need of direct radiation measurements to evaluate fuel changes in industrial processes that are highly dependent on the heat transfer conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier , 2015. Vol. 138, p. 210-220, article id 4558
Keywords [en]
Co-firing, Particle radiation, Radiative heat transfer, Radiative intensity, Rotary kilns, Alternative fuels, Brickmaking, Coal, Coal combustion, Combustion, Fuels, Furnaces, Iron ores, Natural gas, Radiation, Radiative transfer, Heat transfer conditions, Industrial processs, Particle properties, Radiation intensity, Heat transfer
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-43908DOI: 10.1016/j.fuproc.2015.05.021Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84936770371OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-43908DiVA, id: diva2:1393051
Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus
By organisation
SP Energy Technology Center
In the same journal
Fuel processing technology
Engineering and Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.9