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Cross-linked gelatin-nanocellulose scaffolds for bone tissue engineering
University of Bergen, Norway.
University of Bergen, Norway.
National Research Council of Italy, Italy.
National Research Council of Italy, Italy.
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2020 (English)In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 264, article id 127326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wood-based cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) have, in addition to high specific surface area and high surface reactivity, ability to mimic nanostructured collagen in bone extracellular matrix. These properties make CNFs promising materials for bone tissue engineering (BTE). The CNFs degrade slowly in vivo. By blending and cross-linking gelatin (Gel) with CNFs, scaffolds were produced with tuned degradation rate and enhanced mechanical properties, more suitable for BTE applications. This in vitro study aimed to examine initial biological responses of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to cross-linked Gel-CNF scaffolds. The scaffolds were fabricated from 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-oxidized CNF blended with Gel and cross-linked either by dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) or by a combination of hexamethylenediamine, genipin, and DHT. CNF scaffolds without cross-linking served as control. The produced scaffolds supported cell attachment, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation. However, the early cell attachment after 1 day and the expression of RUNX2 and SPP1 genes after 7 days were highest in the CNF scaffolds. The results suggest that cross-linked Gel-CNF are cytocompatible and holds potential for BTE applications. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier B.V. , 2020. Vol. 264, article id 127326
Keywords [en]
Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell, Bone tissue engineering, Cytocompatibility, Osteogenic differentiation, Wood-based nanocellulose, Biomechanics, Blending, Bone, Cell culture, Cell engineering, Cellulose, Degradation, Implants (surgical), Nanocellulose, Stem cells, Tissue, Wood, 2, 2, 6, 6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl, Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), High specific surface area, Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, Scaffolds (biology)
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Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-43386DOI: 10.1016/j.matlet.2020.127326Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85077918674OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-43386DiVA, id: diva2:1390373
Note

Funding details: 228147; Funding details: Micropalaeontological Society, TMS; Funding text 1: This work has been funded by the Research Council of Norway through the NORCEL project, (Grant no. 228147 ) and Trond Mohn Foundation (TMS, project no. BFS2018TMT10). Appendix A

Available from: 2020-01-31 Created: 2020-01-31 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved

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Syverud, Kristin

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