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Business model design for a wearable biofeedback system
Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
2015 (English)In: Stud. Health Technol. Informatics, IOS Press , 2015, Vol. 211, p. 213-224Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Wearable sensor technologies used to track daily activities have become successful in the consumer market. In order for wearable sensor technology to offer added value in the more challenging areas of stress-rehab care and occupational health stress-related biofeedback parameters need to be monitored and more elaborate business models are needed. To identify probable success factors for a wearable biofeedback system (Affective Health) in the two mentioned market segments in a Swedish setting, we conducted literature studies and interviews with relevant representatives. Data were collected and used first to describe the two market segments and then to define likely feasible business model designs, according to the Business Model Canvas framework. Needs of stakeholders were identified as inputs to business model design. Value propositions, a key building block of a business model, were defined for each segment. The value proposition for occupational health was defined as "A tool that can both identify employees at risk of stress-related disorders and reinforce healthy sustainable behavior" and for healthcare as: "Providing therapists with objective data about the patient's emotional state and motivating patients to better engage in the treatment process". © 2015 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press , 2015. Vol. 211, p. 213-224
Keywords [en]
Business model, Stress-management, Wearable sensor technology, Biofeedback, Health risks, Industrial hygiene, Nanosensors, Nanotechnology, Occupational risks, Patient treatment, Business model designs, Business modeling, Literature studies, Occupational health, Sensor technologies, Stress management, Treatment process, Value proposition, Wearable sensors, ambulatory monitoring, biomedical technology assessment, commercial phenomena, daily life activity, devices, diagnosis, human, mental stress, needs assessment, organization and management, Sweden, Activities of Daily Living, Biofeedback, Psychology, Commerce, Humans, Monitoring, Ambulatory, Stress, Psychological, Technology Assessment, Biomedical
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-43162DOI: 10.3233/978-1-61499-516-6-213Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84939238219ISBN: 9781614995159 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-43162DiVA, id: diva2:1389366
Conference
2 June 2015 through 4 June 2015
Note

Conference code: 112587; Cited By :1; Export Date: 13 January 2020; Conference Paper; Correspondence Address: Hidefjäll, P.; Unit for Bioentrepreneurship, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodav. 18 A, Sweden; email: patrik.hidefjall@ki.se

Available from: 2020-01-29 Created: 2020-01-29 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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