Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Genetic polymorphism and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonellaenterica serovar Enteritidis isolates from veterinary and food sourcesin Bulgaria
Bulgarian Food Safety Agency, Bulgaria.
National Veterinary Institute, Sweden.
Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
Statens Serum Institut, Denmark.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background:Salmonellosis is one of the most frequent food-borne infections. It iscaused by contaminated food mainly of animal origin, although humanto human transmission and numerous environmental contaminationsmay also be inflicted. Between 30 and 60% of the reported food-borneoutbreaks in the EU are caused by Salmonella and this is the secondmost commonly reported food-borne infection causing gastroenteritis.Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the mostwidespread serovar in Europe and other parts of the world.

Methods:In this study we analysed forty-nine S. Enteritidis isolates from veterinaryand food sources in Bulgaria obtained during the period of eight years.We used multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis(MLVA) genotyping and the classical antimicrobial resistance (AMR) discdiffusion method to test the diversity of the isolates.

Results:Results showed that isolates were divided into twenty-four MLVA andnine AMR profiles. The calculated Simpsons diversity index was 0.956for MLVA and 0.754 for AMR, respectively. The AMR testing revealed that47% of the isolates were resistant to one and 4% to ≥4 antimicrobials.The most frequent resistotypes were resistance to sulphonamides (n=21)and sensitive to all compounds (n=9). The most frequent MLVA profileswere 3-5-3-3-11 (n=6); 5-13-2-3-11 (n=5); 5-9-2-3-8 (n=5); 6-12-2-3-11(n=4); 5-10-2-3-11 (n=3); 4-5-3-3-9 (n=3). MLVA profiles are presentedaccording to the order of the loci sequenced: SE1, SE2, SE9, SE3 and SE5.We searched for similar S. Enteritidis MLVA profiles in published data. Apartial match was found for some profiles only.

Conclusions:It could be concluded that the MLVA profiles of S. Enteritidis obtained inthis study (the first ones for Bulgaria) have not been frequently isolatedin other counties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
Salmonellosis, S. Enteritidis, Zoonoses, Genetic testing
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-42458OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-42458DiVA, id: diva2:1383632
Conference
European Scientific Conference on Applied Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Stockholm, Sweden, 2019
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Löfström, Charlotta

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Löfström, Charlotta
By organisation
Agrifood and Bioscience
Engineering and Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 25 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.9