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Compression moulding of sheet moulding compound: Modelling with computational fluid dynamics and validation
Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
RISE, Swerea, SICOMP.
2015 (English)In: Journal of reinforced plastics and composites (Print), ISSN 0731-6844, E-ISSN 1530-7964, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 479-492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Compression moulding experiments of sheet moulding compound, visual observations of a vacuum test with prepregs and numerical models with two main approaches for computational fluid dynamics simulations of the mould filling phase are presen ed. One assumes that there are layers near the mould surfaces with much less viscosity and the other only use one viscosity model. The numerical experiments showed that the pressure could be accurately predicted with both approaches. The property ne essary to predict correct pressure with altered mould closing velocities was that the bulk material had to obey shear-thinni g effects. Preheating effects before compression were neglected, but altering the heating time until the prepreg was assumed to start flow had a significant effect. The experiments confirmed that the pressure is predominantly affected by the mould c osing velocity. Regardless of the considered process settings, a first pressure top always appeared approximately at the logarithmic strain 0.25. A second top was associated with a slowdown of the press. The location of this was affected by the velocity and the vacuum, the latter indicating that vacuum assistance prevents a build-up of back pressure. Furthermore, heated prepreg above a critical temperature is observed to swell immediately as vacuum assistance is applied.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 34, no 6, p. 479-492
Keywords [en]
compression moulding, computational fluid dynamics, modelling, Sheet moulding compound, Compression molding, Dynamics, Fluid dynamics, Models, Molding, Molds, Shear flow, Shear thinning, Sheet molding compounds, Viscosity, Computational fluid dynamics simulations, Critical temperatures, Logarithmic strain, Numerical experiments, Shear thinning effect, Transport phenomena, Viscosity modeling, Visual observations, Transport properties
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-41030DOI: 10.1177/0731684415573981Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84925987202OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-41030DiVA, id: diva2:1377038
Note

Funding details: VINNOVA; Funding text 1: This research is supported by the Swedish Agency for Innovation Systems (VINNOVA) and the participating industries in the FYS-project. b temperature constant f f volume fraction of fibres h height n strain rate sensitivity T temperature γ · shear strain rate ɛ strain η viscosity λ time constant σ stress

Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2019-12-10Bibliographically approved

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