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Real-time monitoring of indoor air corrosivity in cultural heritage institutions with metallic electrical resistance sensors
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, KIMAB. (Institut de la Corrosion)
Institute of Chemical Technology, Czech Republic.
Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, France.
National Museum of Denmark, Denmark.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Studies in Conservation, ISSN 0039-3630, E-ISSN 2047-0584, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 117-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A system for continuous monitoring of atmospheric corrosivity has been developed. An electronic unit measures and records changes in the electrical resistance of a thin metal track applied on an insulating substrate. If the metal corrodes, the effective cross sectional area of the track decreases and the electrical resistance increases. Sensors made of silver, copper, iron/steel, zinc, lead, tin, aluminium, bronze, and brass at thicknesses from 50 nm to 250 μm were tailored for environments with different corrosivities. The developed technology proved capable of providing high sensitivity, allowing for real-time corrosion monitoring even in low-corrosive indoor cultural heritage facilities. Laboratory tests showed good reproducibility with the standard deviation of parallel measurements at less than ±20% for metals which corrode uniformly in the tested environments. Several examples selected from a broad testing programme in partner museums, libraries, and other institutions show successful applications of the logger system for characterization of air quality control in indoor locations, during transport and in temporary exhibitions; assessment of new buildings and storage facilities; and fundamental studies of optimal conservation and storage procedures. A first outline of a classification system for lead, which is particularly sensitive to the presence of carboxylic acids, is given. The technique has a large potential as an independent method for monitoring air quality in facilities displaying and storing valuable objects of cultural heritage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 58, no 2, p. 117-128
Keywords [en]
Air quality control, Copper, Material degradation, Metal corrosion, Reactive monitoring, Silver, Atmospheric corrosivity, Continuous monitoring, Electrical resistance sensors, Electrical resistances, Insulating substrates, Real time corrosion monitoring, Air quality, Corrosion, Historic preservation, Quality control, Sensors, Electric resistance
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-40408DOI: 10.1179/2047058412Y.0000000080Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84877880576OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-40408DiVA, id: diva2:1361456
Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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