Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The mineralogical composition of sandstone and its effect on sulphur dioxide deposition
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, CBI Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1904-7426
2008 (English)In: Materiales de Construcción, Vol. 58, no 289-290, p. 81-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Air pollutants often accelerate stone deterioration in historical buildings and monuments in urban areas. The pollutants are themselves the products of fossil fuel combustion and intensive farming. While this trend seems to have been curbed by strict emission laws in the European Union, in most developing and emerging countries air pollution is an ongoing process due to increasing energy needs and vehicle traffic. Many factors condition natural stone behaviour with respect to gaseous pollutants. Two of the more prominent of such factors are the composition of the atmosphere and the type of stone. Due to their porosity, sandstones are particularly vulnerable to air pollutant attack. Many of the reactions between non-carbonaceous sandstones and these gases are not well understood, however. The present study aimed to acquire an understanding of the processes and factors governing sandstone behaviour when exposed to sulphur dioxide. Seven different sandstones from southern and eastern Germany were analyzed for the study. The binder composition of the stones varied significantly. They also exhibited completely different behaviour in connection with SO 2 sorption. Interestingly, while the amount of SO 2 deposited was unrelated to the specific surface area of the sandstones, this parameter was closely correlated to the iron oxide content. Iron oxide phases are believed to act as a catalyst in the oxidation of SO 2 to SO 3 . The type and amount of clay mineral, in turn, was found to have no significant impact on initial SO 2 deposition in sandstones.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 58, no 289-290, p. 81-95
Keywords [en]
catalyst, deposition, deterioration, pollutants, sandstone
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-36094OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-36094DiVA, id: diva2:1261944
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

http://materconstrucc.revistas.csic.es/index.php/materconstrucc/article/view/86/119

Authority records BETA

Mueller, Urs

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mueller, Urs
By organisation
CBI Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Institute
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7