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Pulping and Pretreatment Affect the Characteristics of Bagasse Inks for Three-dimensional Printing
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy, PFI.
Instituto de Materiales de Misiones (IMAM), Misiones Argentina.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
Instituto de Materiales de Misiones (IMAM), Misiones Argentina.
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2018 (English)In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 4068-4075Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bagasse is an underutilized agro-industrial residue with great potential as raw material for the production of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) for a range of applications. In this study, we have assessed the suitability of bagasse for production of CNF for three-dimensional (3D) printing. First, pulp fibers were obtained from the bagasse raw material using two fractionation methods, i.e. soda and hydrothermal treatment combined with soda. Second, the pulp fibers were pretreated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation using two levels of oxidation for comparison purposes. Finally, the CNF were characterized in detail and assessed as inks for 3D printing. The results show that CNF produced from fibers obtained by hydrothermal and soda pulping were less nanofibrillated than the corresponding material produced by soda pulping. However, the CNF sample obtained from soda pulp was cytotoxic, apparently due to a larger content of silica particles. All the CNF materials were 3D printable. We conclude that the noncytotoxic CNF produced from hydrothermally and soda treated pulp can potentially be used as inks for 3D printing of biomedical devices. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 6, no 3, p. 4068-4075
Keyword [en]
3D printing, Biomedical devices, Characterization, Chemical modification, Nanocellulose, Bagasse, Cellulose, Silica, 3-D printing, Agro-industrial residue, Cellulose nanofibrils, Fractionation methods, Hydrothermal treatments, TEMPO-mediated oxidation, Three-dimensional (3D) printing, 3D printers, Chemical Treatment, Printing, Three Dimensional Design
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Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33512DOI: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.7b04440Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85043320290OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-33512DiVA, id: diva2:1192834
Note

Funding details: UN, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Funding details: CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Funding details: NTNU, National Taiwan Normal University; Funding details: EDS; Funding details: PFI, Population Foundation of India; Funding details: 271054, Norges Forskningsråd; 

Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved

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