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Energy-efficient outdoor cultivation of oleaginous microalgae at northern latitudes using waste heat and flue gas from a pulp and paper mill
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry and Materials.
Nordic Paper Bäckhammars Bruk AB, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 31, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy efficient cultivation is the major bottleneck for microalgal biomass production on a large scale and considered very difficult to attain at northern latitudes. In this study an unconventional method for industrial microalgae cultivation for bio-oil production using pulp and paper mill waste resources while harvesting only once a year was performed, mainly in order to investigate the energy efficiency of the process. Algae were cultivated for three months in 2014 in covered pond systems with access to flue gas and waste heat from the industry, and the biomass was recovered as thick sediment sludge after dewatering. The cultivation systems, designed to manage the waste resources, reached a promising photosynthetic efficiency of at most 1.1%, a net energy ratio (NER) of 0.25, and a projected year-round energy biomass yield per area 5.2 times higher than corresponding rapeseed production at the location. Thus, microalgae cultivation was, for the first time, proven energy efficient in a cold continental climate. Energy-rich indigenous communities quickly out-competed the oleaginous monocultures used for inoculation. The recovered biomass had higher heating values of 20–23 MJ kg− 1 and contained 14–19% oil dominated by C16 followed by C18 fatty acids. The cultivation season at 59°15′N, 14°18′E was projected to be efficient for 10 months and waste heat drying of the biomass is suggested for two winter months. The technique is proposed for carbon sequestering and energy storage in the form of microalgal sludge or dry matter for later conversion into biochemicals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 31, p. 138-146
Keywords [en]
Autotrophic, Energy efficiency, Flue gas, Lipids, Microalgae, Pulp and paper
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33428DOI: 10.1016/j.algal.2017.11.007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85041819849OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-33428DiVA, id: diva2:1189237
Note

Funding details: 2012-03987, VINNOVA

Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved

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