Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The morphology and internal composition of dried particles from whole milk—From single droplet to full scale drying
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces. Lund University, Sweden.
GEA Process Engineering A/S, Denmark.
Lund University, Sweden.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces.
2017 (English)In: Food Structure, ISSN 2213-3291, Vol. 13, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Powder structure and functionality are expected to be closely linked to the composition and drying process. In order to understand the optimization of the quality of a powder, e.g. encapsulation efficiency, or wetting and dispersion properties, monitoring of the particle microstructure is an attractive concept. However, to study the impact of different parameters in formulation and drying process on full scale is complicated and expensive, hence, studies on smaller scale, even single particle drying, is a potentially useful complement, as long as the results are comparable. The aim of this study is to compare morphology and internal composition of whole milk particles produced at different dryer scales to assess the development of internal structure in powder formed by spray drying. Whole milk was spray dried in the single particle dryer, laboratory dryer, pilot plant dryer and full scale dryer. The morphology and composition of the particles obtained were analyzed by low vacuum-SEM, confocal Raman microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Phenomena such as adsorption of surface active compounds at the particle surface and phase segregation are observed to different extent, depending on particle size and drying time. The scale of drying influences the internal microstructure and distribution of components in the particles, and to a small extent also the external morphology. These effects are proposed to be related to the drying times for different droplet sizes, although mechanical handling effects and agglomeration in the full scale dryer may also influence the final morphology of these particles, as well as the surface composition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 13, p. 35-44
Keywords [en]
Confocal Raman microscopy, Morphology, Scale-up, Spray drying, Surface Composition, Whole milk powder
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-33165DOI: 10.1016/j.foostr.2017.02.001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85015260861OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-33165DiVA, id: diva2:1176697
Available from: 2018-01-23 Created: 2018-01-23 Last updated: 2018-01-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus
By organisation
Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 4 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.34.0