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Measurement of self‐heatingpotential of biomass pellets with isothermal calorimetry
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Safety.
2017 (English)In: Fire and Materials, ISSN 0308-0501, E-ISSN 1099-1018Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

In order to assess the risk for spontaneous combustion of biomass pellets during storage it is important to know how prone the fuel is to self-heating, i.e. to determine the reactivity. 

This article presents the results from isothermal calorimetry tests performed on 31 different biomass pellet batches. The purpose of the tests has been to characterize pellets by measuring the reactivity and investigate how the pellet composition influences the heat release rate and thereby the self-heating potential of pellets. 

The results from the tests clearly indicate that there is a significant difference in reactivity between different types of pellets. The tested high reactive pellet batches reached maximum specific heat release rates (HRRmax) of 0.61-1.06 mW/g while pellet batches with low reactivity showed HRRmax of 0.05-0.18 mW/g. The tested batches were primarily ranked based on HRRmax but an alternative ranking based on specific total heat release rate during the test period was also used for comparison. 

The test results also indicate that pine/spruce mix pellets are significantly more reactive than all other types of pellets tested and that pellets consisting of 100 % pine are more reactive than pellets consisting of 100 % spruce. Pellets produced from wine pruning/grape pomace (winery wastes), straw or eucalyptus are not very reactive compared to pellets consisting of pine/spruce. 

The results also show that the reactivity of the pellets can be reduced by either introducing certain kinds of anti-oxidants into the pellets or by extracting lipids from the raw material of pellets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
isothermal calorimetry, biomass pellets, wood pellets, self-heating, reactivity, screening test
Keyword [sv]
isoterm kalorimetri, pellets, biomassa, självuppvärmning, reaktivitet, screeningtest
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-31275DOI: 10.1002/fam.2441OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-31275DiVA: diva2:1142937
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 287026
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2017-10-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
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