Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Gastrointestinal illness linked to incidents in drinking water distribution networks in Sweden
National Food Agency, Sweden ; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
National Food Agency, Sweden.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
National Food Agency, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 122, 503-511 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During recent years, knowledge gaps on drinking water-related gastrointestinal illness have been identified, especially for non-epidemic cases. Pathogen contamination of drinking water during distribution has been suggested to contribute to these cases, but the risk factors are not yet fully understood. During 2014–2015, we conducted an epidemiological study in five municipalities in Sweden, to assess whether incidents in the drinking water distribution system influence the risk of gastrointestinal illness. Telephone interviews were conducted in the affected areas and in reference areas 7–14 days after a reported incident. Symptoms of gastrointestinal illness occurring during the period were documented for each household member. The results showed a significantly elevated risk of vomiting and acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in the affected areas, compared to the reference areas (ORvom. = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.2–3.3; ORAGI = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–3.0). Certain conditions, or risk factors, during the incidents, such as sewage and drinking water pipelines at the same level in the trench, were associated with an elevated risk of AGI and vomiting. Safety measures taken during repair work, like flushing, were also associated with an elevated risk of AGI and vomiting. These results show that incidents in the drinking water distribution network contribute to endemic gastrointestinal illness, especially AGI and vomiting, and that external pathogen contamination of the drinking water is a likely cause of these cases of gastrointestinal illness. The results also indicate that safety measures used today may not be sufficient for eliminating the risk of gastrointestinal illness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 122, 503-511 p.
Keyword [en]
Drinking water, Gastrointestinal illness, Pipe breaks, Pressure, Public health risks, Water distribution
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-30798DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2017.06.013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85020796696OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-30798DiVA: diva2:1138742
Note

Funding details: MSB dnr 2012-172, MSB, Myndigheten för Samhällsskydd och Beredskap; Funding text: This study was funded by a Swedish non-profitable governmental agency, the Civil Contingencies Agency (grant number MSB dnr 2012-172).

Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2017-09-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus
By organisation
Energy and Circular Economy
In the same journal
Water Research
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.27.0