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The importance of including secondary effects when defining the system boundary with life cycle perspective: Case study for design of an external wall
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Building Technology.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Built Environment, Energy and Circular Economy.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden.
Lund University, Sweden.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 143, 1105-1113 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis are suitable tools in trying to minimize environmental impact and cost. To get reliable results it is crucial to set up correct system boundaries for the investigation, but it is often difficult to understand a complex products system because of the cascade effects of consequences that can be induced even by small changes. In this paper the effects and consequences evaluation (ECE) method is introduced to systematically identify and organize the effects and consequences for a design change of parts of a complex system. The method is applied in a case study of external wall insulation for a new building to investigate the importance of correct system boundaries. Using the methodical approach in identifying all significant consequences showed that unexpected unit processes can be important when deciding on the relevant system boundary. We also conclude that such processes can have a significant impact on the final results by calculating the change in global warming potential and life cycle cost for the processes affected by the design option.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 143, 1105-1113 p.
Keyword [en]
Building, External wall, Global warming, Life cycle assessment, Life cycle cost assessment, System boundary, Buildings, Cost benefit analysis, Costs, Ecodesign, Environmental impact, Structural design, Walls (structural partitions), External wall insulations, External walls, Global warming potential, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Life cycle cost analysis, Life cycle perspectives, Lifecycle costs, Life cycle
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-31047DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.12.009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85008169591OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-31047DiVA: diva2:1137804
Note

 Funding details: 2013-003176, Energimyndigheten; Funding text: We would like to thank the Development Fund of the Swedish Construction Industry (SBUF) (12809) and the Swedish Energy Agency (2013-003176) for funding this study, as well as Skanska Sverige AB for providing information on and insights into the building production process.

Available from: 2017-09-01 Created: 2017-09-01 Last updated: 2017-09-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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