Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Feeling fine - the effect of topography and friction on perceived roughness and slipperiness
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces.
RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials, Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces.
KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)In: Biotribology, ISSN 2352-5738Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

(1) Background. To design materials with specific haptic qualities, it is important to understand both the contribution of physical attributes from the surfaces of the materials and the perceptions that are involved in the haptic interaction. (2) Methods. A series of 16 wrinkled surfaces consisting of two similar materials of different elastic modulus and 8 different wrinkle wavelengths were characterized in terms of surface roughness and tactile friction coefficient. Sixteen participants scaled the perceived Roughness and Slipperiness of the surfaces using free magnitude estimation. Friction experiments were performed both by participants and by a trained experimenter with higher control. (3) Results and discussion. The trends in friction properties were similar for the group of participants performing the friction measurements in an uncontrolled way and the experiments performed under well-defined conditions, showing that the latter type of measurements represent the general friction properties well. The results point to slipperiness as the key perception dimension for textures below 100. μm and roughness above 100. μm. Furthermore, it is apparent that roughness and slipperiness perception of these types of structures are not independent. The friction is related to contact area between finger and material. Somewhat surprising was that the material with the higher elastic modulus was perceived as more slippery. A concluding finding was that the flat (high friction) reference surfaces were scaled as rough, supporting the theory that perceived roughness itself is a multidimensional construct with both surface roughness and friction component.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keyword [en]
Friction, Roughness, Slipperiness, Tactile perception
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ri:diva-31183DOI: 10.1016/j.biotri.2017.01.002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85023162786OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ri-31183DiVA: diva2:1135496
Note

Export Date: 23 August 2017; Article in Press

Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-08-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus
By organisation
Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 14 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.27.0